acrylic

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Art

Collaborative Acrylic Paintings That Aim to Visually Map the Perceptual Experiences of Synesthesia

October 9, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

American artist and filmmaker Lucy Engelman has a far different experience of the world than most. Engelman has a phenomenon called Synesthesia, which crosses her perceptual pathways to allow her to taste colors, smell sounds, and even experience verbal data as a spectrum of vibrant colors. Engelman’s husband, Scottish painter Daniel Mullen, decided to translate her complex sensory world in a way that might be easier to understand for those of us who don’t see days and numbers as pockets of color.

The collaboration exists as a set of paintings titled A Different Kind of Time: Sequencing Spatial Temporal Synesthesia. The works each contain a sequence of flat rectangular shapes arranged in a variety of arches and lines. The angle of the shapes is switched in each work, some aligned with only one side facing the audience, while others seem to project right through the canvas or retreat back into the painting’s rotated plane. Engelman explains the works are the closest visual approximation to what she experiences, especially in relation to her mind’s translation of letters, numbers, and time.

You can view more of the paintings based on Engelman’s unique view of the world on Daniel Mullen’s website. (via Colossal Submissions)

 

 



Art Photography

Three-Dimensional Landscapes Formed with Layered Acrylic Photographs by Nobuhiro Nakanishi

June 6, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

© Nobuhiro Nakanishi, Courtesy of Yumiko Chiba Associates, Photo: Susanne Hakuba

Japanese artist Nobuhiro Nakanishi creates sculptural works that attempt to preserve a singular moment in the natural world, capturing deeply pigmented sunsets and brightly-lit forests in a series he’s titled Layer Drawings. To produce the three-dimensional installations, Nakanishi first photographs an environment over a period of time. He then mounts selected images from his documentation on panels of acrylic in chronological order, allowing slight variation from frame to frame.

“We are all subject to the passing of time, yet each of us feels and perceives it in our own way,” says Nakaniski, “Time itself has no shape or boundary and cannot be fixed or grasped. When we look at the photographs in these sculptures, we attempt to fill in the gaps between the individual images. We draw from our physical experiences to fill in missing time and space, both ephemeral and vague. In this series, I attempt to depict time and space as sensations shared by both viewer and artist.”

Nakaniski is represented by Yukimo Chiba Associates in Tokyo. You can see more of his layered works on his website. (via Tu Recepcja)

Installation view: Transparent view, Aomori Contemporary Art Centre, Aomori, Japan (2011), © Nobuhiro Nakanishi, Courtesy of Yumiko Chiba Associates, Photo: Tadasu Yamamoto, Photo Courtesy: Aomori Contemporary Art Centre, Aomori, Japan

Installation view: Transparent view, Aomori Contemporary Art Centre, Aomori, Japan (2011), © Nobuhiro Nakanishi, Courtesy of Yumiko Chiba Associates, Photo: Tadasu Yamamoto, Photo Courtesy: Aomori Contemporary Art Centre, Aomori, Japan

Installation view: Transparent view, Aomori Contemporary Art Centre, Aomori, Japan (2011), © Nobuhiro Nakanishi, Courtesy of Yumiko Chiba Associates, Photo: Tadasu Yamamoto, Photo Courtesy: Aomori Contemporary Art Centre, Aomori, Japan

Installation view: Saturation, Osaka Contemporary Art Center, Japan
 (2006), © Nobuhiro Nakanishi, Courtesy of Yumiko Chiba Associates, Photo: Seiji Toyonaga

Installation view: Saturation, Osaka Contemporary Art Center, Japan 
(2006), © Nobuhiro Nakanishi, Courtesy of Yumiko Chiba Associates, Photo: Seiji Toyonaga

Installation view: Saturation, Osaka Contemporary Art Center, Japan 
(2006), © Nobuhiro Nakanishi, Courtesy of Yumiko Chiba Associates, Photo: Seiji Toyonaga

© Nobuhiro Nakanishi, Courtesy of Yumiko Chiba Associates, Photo: Susanne Hakuba

 

 



Art

Hyperrealistic Depictions of Fish Merged With Their Coral Environments by Lisa Ericson

December 15, 2016

Kate Sierzputowski

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Artist, illustrator, and designer Lisa Ericson (previously) paints hyperrealistic images of imaginary animals, hybrids that intertwine species. Previously focused on a body of work that merged mice and butterflies, Ericson’s newest series focuses on the creatures below, painting bright fish against matte black backgrounds. The vibrant works highlight a variety of coral integrated into fins and tails of scaly animals, as well as showcasing the groups of fish that have decided to make these tails their home.

Ericson’s work is currently in a two-person exhibition titled Supernature at Antler Gallery in Portland, OR which runs through December 22. You can view more of her in-process and completed animal paintings on her Instagram and Facebook.

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Art

Vibrantly Hued Canvas Sculptures by Artist Duo ‘Stallman’

September 23, 2015

Kate Sierzputowski

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Meticulously folding canvas and layering color, the art duo Stallman (Jason Hallman and Stephen Stum) turn a traditional painting surface on its head, using the structure of the canvas to give their works vibrant depth. The two artists are deeply inspired by gradients found in the natural world, their color selection and positioning appearing almost topographic.

The Pacific Northwest based pair calls this body of work “Canvas on Edge,” giving canvas the leading roll within each each piece. By positioning the medium outward its curved shapes become all about depth and form and serve as large, elevated line drawings.

Hallman and Stum (the two combined their names to create their artist title) are both partners in the studio and life. “We create together, one acting as the right side of the brain and the other the left,” says Stallman. “This union of dynamic minds dissolves the boundaries of what is possible turning the ordinary into extraordinary.”

The duo currently has an exhibition of new works at Hall | Spassov Gallery that continues until September 30, 2015. You can see more sculptures on their Facebook page here.

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Art

Hyperrealistic Depictions of a Fictional Mouse-Butterfly Species by Lisa Ericson

March 30, 2015

Kate Sierzputowski

“Bliss”, Acrylic on Wood Panel, 11″x14″

“Bliss”, Acrylic on Wood Panel, 11″x 14″

“Perch”, Acrylic on Wood Panel, 9″x12″

“Perch”, Acrylic on Wood Panel, 9″x 12″

“Gatherer II”, Acrylic on Wood Panel, 8″x10″

“Gatherer II”, Acrylic on Wood Panel, 8″x 10″

"Gatherer I", Acrylic on Wood Panel, 8″x10″

“Gatherer I”, Acrylic on Wood Panel, 8″x 10″

“Hover”, Acrylic on Wood Panel, 13″x16″

“Hover”, Acrylic on Wood Panel, 13″x 16″

“Artista”, Acrylic on Wood Panel, 16″x16″

“Artista”, Acrylic on Wood Panel, 16″x 16″

Lisa Ericson‘s logo is just as enchanting as her hyperrealistic paintings, a tiny mouse with butterfly wings floating between her first and last name. Ericson works as a multi-hyphenate, utilizing her visual talents as an artist, illustrator, and designer to craft meaningful images for both her client and personal practice.

In her newest series Ericson skillfully depicts her invented species of mouse-butterfly while they explore environments filled with detailed mushrooms, forgotten tin jars, and forest brush while sometimes clutching found objects such as acorns and raspberries.

Ericson’s first exhibition, and one featuring this series, is displayed at Portland’s Antler Gallery alongside Heiko Müller and John Casey until April, 27th. During my research I also learned that Ericson illustrated Ramona Ausubel’s website (one of my favorite contemporary authors), and can be seen here. (via This Isn’t Happiness, Hi-Fructose)

 

 



Art Illustration

Poetic Acrylic Paintings by Duy Huynh

February 5, 2015

Christopher Jobson

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Vietnamese born artist Duy Huynh creates poetic acrylic paintings inspired by stories drawn from ancient folklore, comic books, film, and music. After moving to the United States as a child in the early 80s he took refuge in art as he struggled with language barriers and his new surroundings. Themes of cultural and geographical displacement frequently appear in Huynh’s work, including what he describes as “attempts to literally and symbolically connect fluid patterns in nature/wildlife with that of human made aspiration.” He currently has many original works available through Lark & Key Gallery, and you can see more in his archives. (via Cross Connect)

 

 



Art

Urban Cityscapes Emerge from Haphazard Brushstrokes

November 13, 2013

Christopher Jobson

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When first discovering these paintings by Korean artist Jieun Park, either on a distant gallery wall or on a small website thumbnail, you might first mistake them for nothing more than thick abstract brushstrokes on on a large canvas. A closer look reveals entire nighttime cityscapes embedded in the blots of paint, glimpses of Paris, Hong Kong, Prague, and other cities from Park’s travels. The artist has numerous prints and originals available over on Saatchi Online.