aerial

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Photography

Aerial Images of Vibrant Landscapes by Photographer Niaz Uddin

September 19, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

The Grand Prismatic Spring at Yellowstone National Park (all images via Niaz Uddin)

Niaz Uddin is a photographer, director, and filmmaker that explores a variety of natural landscapes from high above. His color-saturated photographs explore crowded beaches and remote tide pools, capturing each of the scenic environments from a bird’s eye view. One of my favorite images is the picture above, which provides a rare perspective of the Grand Prismatic Spring in Yellowstone National Park. You can see even more sky-high images on his Instagram, and buy limited prints on his website.

Laguna Beach

Laguna Beach

Manhattan Beach

Manhattan Beach

 

 



Photography

Surreal Aerial Views of Fish Farms Captured by Bernhard Lang

July 13, 2017

Christopher Jobson

Flying in a helicopter high above the coast of Greece, German photographer Bernhard Lang captures unusual networks of circular fish farms. The strange, ovoid enclosures appear like abstract geometric designs, hardly related to the thriving ecosystems of fish that lay just below the surface. Aquaculture is seen by many as a more efficient way to safely breed larger volumes of fish instead of harvesting wild populations, but concerns about the environmental impact near farming sites have raised a lot of questions.

“Greece’s aquaculture industry is important for the country,” Lang shares with Colossal. “Especially [because of] the bad economic situation in Greece. Fish, mainly sea bass and sea bream is one of their biggest agricultural exports, next to olive oil.” That said, fish prices have fallen sharply in recent years, further threatening a burgeoning industry.

Lang is known for his aerial studies of industry, wildlife, and landscapes around the world including a recent series of harbors in the Philippines and a colorful collection of beach umbrellas in the Italian resort town of Adria. You can follow more of his recent photography on Behance and Instagram.

 

 



Photography

Aerial Photography Captures the Moonlike Beauty of Footprints Across Lithuania’s Frozen Lakes

April 12, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

53°58'58.1"N 24°06'16.9"E

53°58’58.1″N 24°06’16.9″E

Designer and part-time photographer Mantas Bačiuška uses aerial photography to capture the frozen lakes of Lithuania, flying his drone-attached camera over 300 feet above the water’s icy surface. The cross-hatched lines of footprints and circular ice patterns appear simultaneously macro and microscopic, the images looking like either an extraterrestrial landscape or zoomed in microscope slide.

Each photo is titled with the exact longitude and latitude of its location, a technical detail that is an important part of the work. When Bačiuška is not flying his high powered drones in his hometown of Druskininkai, Lithuania he is a freelance motion graphic designer. You can see more of his work, as well as more images from his series Moonlike Icy Lakes, on his Behance.

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54°02’19.0″N 24°04’58.1″E

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54°02’30.1″N 24°05’12.1″E

54°02'03.8"N 24°04'30.0"E

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54°03'13.0"N 23°53'06.0"E​​​​​​​

54°03’13.0″N 23°53’06.0″E​​​​​​​

54°00'50.0"N 23°58'23.9"E

54°00’50.0″N 23°58’23.9″E

54°02'20.0"N 24°05'02.0"E

54°02’20.0″N 24°05’02.0″E

 

 



Photography

Abstract Aerial Photographs of Southern Africa by Zack Seckler

March 22, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

Photographer Zack Seckler's latest series took him 2,000 miles through South Africa, each piece shot from the passenger seat of a two-seater sport plane. The works feature animal tracks and shadows as compositional elements, capturing herds of flamingos, gemsbok, and even a solo turtle resting in the dazzling blue water.

“From elevations between 50 and 500 feet, the landscape hovers on the line between things looking very real and recognizable and being more abstract,” said Seckler. “That’s what really draws me in—the line between reality and abstraction.”

Seckler’s aerial photographs will be exhibited in a solo show of his work titled Zack Seckler: South Africa at ClampArt in New York City opening April 13. You can see more of his work (including this series of horse portraits) on his Instagram and Facebook, and a behind-the-scenes video of the week-long journey below. (via Colossal Submissions)

 

 



Photography

Sky-High Images of Los Angeles at Dusk and Dawn by Dylan Schwartz

January 9, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

Creative Director and photographer Dylan Schwartz‘s point-of-view is high above the cities he photographs, capturing the bridges, sports complexes, and tips of high rises from the cockpit of a helicopter. Most of Schwartz’s images feature his hometown of LA as the subject, showcasing views from Hollywood to Chinatown during the hazy moments right before dusk and dawn.

Schwartz’s sky-high images of LA will be exhibited next week at PHOTOLA with artbarltd from January 12 through 15. You can see more of his work on his Instagram and website.

 

 



Photography

Aerial Images of Salterns That Blur the Line Between Photograph and Painting by David Burdeny

November 30, 2016

Kate Sierzputowski

Pink Pools, Hut Lagoon, Western Australia, 2015

Pink Pools, Hut Lagoon, Western Australia, 2015

Photographer David Burdeny, whose photo of a towering iceberg we featured last month, has been working on another large-scale photography project. Burdeny began the series SALT: Fields, Plottings and Extracts in 2015, using aerial photography to explore some of the world’s most vibrant salterns in Utah, Mexico, and Australia. Gazing upon the images it’s difficult to determine whether the expressive boxes of color are produced with a camera or paintbrush, or if the gestures were made by hand or nature.

“In their use of amorphous shapes, elongated fields of color and vertical, jagged and sinuous lines, Burdeny’s images suggest the painterly expressiveness of Rothko, Still, Newman, Diebenkorn and late career Willem de Kooning,” explains an essay written about the project. “The effect is less intentional than it is available—Modernism’s abstracted reordering of the visual landscape…permits a non-objective reading of these compositions.”

These works, along with a selection of Burdeny’s aerial photographs from Dutch flower fields, will be included in the solo exhibition Salt and Veld opening December 15th at Gilman Contemporary. The exhibition runs through January 20, 2017. You can see images from Burdeny’s SALT series, as well images from Cuba, Russia, and Brazil on his website.

Saltern Study 14, Great Salt Lake, UT, 2015

Saltern Study 14, Great Salt Lake, UT, 2015

Saltern Study 02, Great Salt Lake, UT, 2015

Saltern Study 02, Great Salt Lake, UT, 2015

Saltern Study 15, Great Salt Lake, UT, 2015

Saltern Study 15, Great Salt Lake, UT, 2015

Saltern Study 06, Great Salt Lake, UT, 2015

Saltern Study 06, Great Salt Lake, UT, 2015

Saltern Study 12, Great Salt Lake, UT, 2015

Saltern Study 12, Great Salt Lake, UT, 2015

Searles Lake 2, Mojave Desert, California, USA, 2015

Searles Lake 2, Mojave Desert, California, USA, 2015

Saltern Study 08, Great Salt Lake, UT, 2015

Saltern Study 08, Great Salt Lake, UT, 2015

 

 



Photography Science

Overview: A New Book of High-Def Satellite Images Capturing How People Have Changed the Earth

October 28, 2016

Christopher Jobson

03-gemasolar-thermosolar-plant

Gemasolar Thermosolar Plant / 37·560755°, –5·331908° / This Overview captures the Gemasolar Thermosolar Plant in Seville, Spain. The solar concentrator contains 2,650 heliostat mirrors that focus the sun’s thermal energy to heat molten salt flowing through a 140-metre-tall (460-foot) central tower. The molten salt then circulates from the tower to a storage tank, where it is used to produce steam and generate electricity. In total, the facility displaces approximately 30,000 tonnes of carbon dioxide emissions every year.

In December of 2013, an Instagram account called Daily Overview began to catalog a wide spectrum of satellite images that capture the many ways people have transformed the face of Earth, for better or worse. The account is run by Benjamin Grant who uses imagery taken from DigitalGlobe, an advanced collection of Earth imaging satellites that provide data to services like Google Earth. The project gets its title from a phenomenon experienced by astronauts who spend extended periods of time in space and what they describe as a “cognitive shift in awareness” as they continuously view the world from above dubbed the overview effect.

As Grant’s Instagram has swelled to nearly a half million followers, some of the best images from the project have been gathered into a new 288-page hardcover book called Overview. The book includes images of our collective impact on Earth, a collection of interlinked systems often too difficult to grasp including aspects of industry, agriculture, and architecture.

All images © 2016 by DigitalGlobe, Inc. from Overview by Benjamin Grant, published by Amphoto Books. Used with permission. (via Twisted Sifter)

04-tulips

Tulips / 52·276355°, 4·557080° / Every year, tulip fields in Lisse, Netherlands begin to bloom in March and are in peak bloom by late April. The Dutch produce a total of 4·3 billion tulip bulbs each year, of which 53% (2·3 billion) is grown into cut flowers. Of these, 1·3 billion are sold in the Netherlands as cut flowers and the remainder is exported: 630 million bulbs to Europe and 370 million elsewhere.

05-olives

Olives / 37·263212°, –4·552271° / Olive tree groves cover the hills of Córdoba, Spain. Approximately 90% of all harvested olives are turned into oil; the remaining 10% are eaten as table olives. With rising temperatures and phenomenal weather variations in growing regions, olive groves on high hills or slopes will probably suffer less, but groves located on low altitude areas or plains could become totally unproductive.

06-moab-potash-evaporation-ponds

Moab Potash Evaporation Ponds / 38·485579°, –109·684611° / Evaporation ponds are visible at the potash mine in Moab, Utah, USA. The mine produces muriate of potash, a potassium-containing salt that is a major component in fertilisers. The salt is pumped to the surface from underground brines and dried in massive solar ponds that vibrantly extend across the landscape. As the water evaporates over the course of 300 days, the salts crystallise out. The colours that are seen here occur because the water is dyed a deep blue, as darker water absorbs more sunlight and heat, thereby reducing the amount of time it takes for the water to evaporate and the potash to crystallise.

09-marabe-al-dhafra

Marabe Al Dhafra / 23·610424°, 53·702677° / The villas of Marabe Al Dhafra in Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates are home to approximately 2,000 people. Located in one of the hottest regions of the world, the record high temperature here is 49·2°C (120·6°F).

15-port-of-singapore

Port of Singapore / 1·237656°, 103·806422° / Cargo ships and tankers – some weighing up to 300,000 tonnes – wait outside the entry to the Port of Singapore. The facility is the world’s second-busiest port in terms of total tonnage, shipping a fifth of the world’s cargo containers and half of the world’s annual supply of crude oil.

20-ipanema-beach

Ipanema Beach / –22·983606°, –43·206638° / Ipanema Beach is located in the South Zone of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Recognised as one of the most beautiful beaches in the world, the sand is divided into segments by lifeguard towers known as ‘postos’.

25-nishinoshima-volcanic-activity

Nishinoshima Volcanic Activity / 27·243362, 140·874420 / Nishinoshima is a volcanic island located 940 kilometres (584 miles) south of Tokyo, Japan. Starting in November 2013, the volcano began to erupt and continued to do so until August 2015. Over the course of the eruption, the area of the island grew in size from 0.06 square kilometres (0.02 square miles) to 2·3 square kilometres (0·89 square miles).

book

 

 

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