Tag Archives: aerial

Sky-High Images of Los Angeles at Dusk and Dawn by Dylan Schwartz 

Creative Director and photographer Dylan Schwartz‘s point-of-view is high above the cities he photographs, capturing the bridges, sports complexes, and tips of high rises from the cockpit of a helicopter. Most of Schwartz’s images feature his hometown of LA as the subject, showcasing views from Hollywood to Chinatown during the hazy moments right before dusk and dawn.

Schwartz’s sky-high images of LA will be exhibited next week at PHOTOLA with artbarltd from January 12 through 15. You can see more of his work on his Instagram and website.

See related posts on Colossal about , , .

Aerial Images of Salterns That Blur the Line Between Photograph and Painting by David Burdeny 

Pink Pools, Hut Lagoon, Western Australia, 2015

Pink Pools, Hut Lagoon, Western Australia, 2015

Photographer David Burdeny, whose photo of a towering iceberg we featured last month, has been working on another large-scale photography project. Burdeny began the series SALT: Fields, Plottings and Extracts in 2015, using aerial photography to explore some of the world’s most vibrant salterns in Utah, Mexico, and Australia. Gazing upon the images it’s difficult to determine whether the expressive boxes of color are produced with a camera or paintbrush, or if the gestures were made by hand or nature.

“In their use of amorphous shapes, elongated fields of color and vertical, jagged and sinuous lines, Burdeny’s images suggest the painterly expressiveness of Rothko, Still, Newman, Diebenkorn and late career Willem de Kooning,” explains an essay written about the project. “The effect is less intentional than it is available—Modernism’s abstracted reordering of the visual landscape…permits a non-objective reading of these compositions.”

These works, along with a selection of Burdeny’s aerial photographs from Dutch flower fields, will be included in the solo exhibition Salt and Veld opening December 15th at Gilman Contemporary. The exhibition runs through January 20, 2017. You can see images from Burdeny’s SALT series, as well images from Cuba, Russia, and Brazil on his website.

Saltern Study 14, Great Salt Lake, UT, 2015

Saltern Study 14, Great Salt Lake, UT, 2015

Saltern Study 02, Great Salt Lake, UT, 2015

Saltern Study 02, Great Salt Lake, UT, 2015

Saltern Study 15, Great Salt Lake, UT, 2015

Saltern Study 15, Great Salt Lake, UT, 2015

Saltern Study 06, Great Salt Lake, UT, 2015

Saltern Study 06, Great Salt Lake, UT, 2015

Saltern Study 12, Great Salt Lake, UT, 2015

Saltern Study 12, Great Salt Lake, UT, 2015

Searles Lake 2, Mojave Desert, California, USA, 2015

Searles Lake 2, Mojave Desert, California, USA, 2015

Saltern Study 08, Great Salt Lake, UT, 2015

Saltern Study 08, Great Salt Lake, UT, 2015

See related posts on Colossal about , .

Overview: A New Book of High-Def Satellite Images Capturing How People Have Changed the Earth 

03-gemasolar-thermosolar-plant

Gemasolar Thermosolar Plant / 37·560755°, –5·331908° / This Overview captures the Gemasolar Thermosolar Plant in Seville, Spain. The solar concentrator contains 2,650 heliostat mirrors that focus the sun’s thermal energy to heat molten salt flowing through a 140-metre-tall (460-foot) central tower. The molten salt then circulates from the tower to a storage tank, where it is used to produce steam and generate electricity. In total, the facility displaces approximately 30,000 tonnes of carbon dioxide emissions every year.

In December of 2013, an Instagram account called Daily Overview began to catalog a wide spectrum of satellite images that capture the many ways people have transformed the face of Earth, for better or worse. The account is run by Benjamin Grant who uses imagery taken from DigitalGlobe, an advanced collection of Earth imaging satellites that provide data to services like Google Earth. The project gets its title from a phenomenon experienced by astronauts who spend extended periods of time in space and what they describe as a “cognitive shift in awareness” as they continuously view the world from above dubbed the overview effect.

As Grant’s Instagram has swelled to nearly a half million followers, some of the best images from the project have been gathered into a new 288-page hardcover book called Overview. The book includes images of our collective impact on Earth, a collection of interlinked systems often too difficult to grasp including aspects of industry, agriculture, and architecture.

All images © 2016 by DigitalGlobe, Inc. from Overview by Benjamin Grant, published by Amphoto Books. Used with permission. (via Twisted Sifter)

04-tulips

Tulips / 52·276355°, 4·557080° / Every year, tulip fields in Lisse, Netherlands begin to bloom in March and are in peak bloom by late April. The Dutch produce a total of 4·3 billion tulip bulbs each year, of which 53% (2·3 billion) is grown into cut flowers. Of these, 1·3 billion are sold in the Netherlands as cut flowers and the remainder is exported: 630 million bulbs to Europe and 370 million elsewhere.

05-olives

Olives / 37·263212°, –4·552271° / Olive tree groves cover the hills of Córdoba, Spain. Approximately 90% of all harvested olives are turned into oil; the remaining 10% are eaten as table olives. With rising temperatures and phenomenal weather variations in growing regions, olive groves on high hills or slopes will probably suffer less, but groves located on low altitude areas or plains could become totally unproductive.

06-moab-potash-evaporation-ponds

Moab Potash Evaporation Ponds / 38·485579°, –109·684611° / Evaporation ponds are visible at the potash mine in Moab, Utah, USA. The mine produces muriate of potash, a potassium-containing salt that is a major component in fertilisers. The salt is pumped to the surface from underground brines and dried in massive solar ponds that vibrantly extend across the landscape. As the water evaporates over the course of 300 days, the salts crystallise out. The colours that are seen here occur because the water is dyed a deep blue, as darker water absorbs more sunlight and heat, thereby reducing the amount of time it takes for the water to evaporate and the potash to crystallise.

09-marabe-al-dhafra

Marabe Al Dhafra / 23·610424°, 53·702677° / The villas of Marabe Al Dhafra in Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates are home to approximately 2,000 people. Located in one of the hottest regions of the world, the record high temperature here is 49·2°C (120·6°F).

15-port-of-singapore

Port of Singapore / 1·237656°, 103·806422° / Cargo ships and tankers – some weighing up to 300,000 tonnes – wait outside the entry to the Port of Singapore. The facility is the world’s second-busiest port in terms of total tonnage, shipping a fifth of the world’s cargo containers and half of the world’s annual supply of crude oil.

20-ipanema-beach

Ipanema Beach / –22·983606°, –43·206638° / Ipanema Beach is located in the South Zone of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Recognised as one of the most beautiful beaches in the world, the sand is divided into segments by lifeguard towers known as ‘postos’.

25-nishinoshima-volcanic-activity

Nishinoshima Volcanic Activity / 27·243362, 140·874420 / Nishinoshima is a volcanic island located 940 kilometres (584 miles) south of Tokyo, Japan. Starting in November 2013, the volcano began to erupt and continued to do so until August 2015. Over the course of the eruption, the area of the island grew in size from 0.06 square kilometres (0.02 square miles) to 2·3 square kilometres (0·89 square miles).

book

See related posts on Colossal about , .

Aerial View of a Hawaiian Volcano Reveals a Giant Smiley Face 

Last week while flying above the Pu’u O’o crater in Hawaii, filmmaker Mick Kalber of Tropical Visions Video and pilot Colin Burkhardt were met with a cheerful surprise: the raging hot volcanic interior had cracked in the form of two lava eyes and a long crooked mouth. The once-in-a-lifetime view was caught on film and is one of many video clips Kalber frequently shares online and in his own volcano documentaries. (via Laughing Squid)

See related posts on Colossal about , , , , .

Boiling Point by Paul Octavious 

boiling-point

Photographer Paul Octavious captured the above image using a drone in his Chicago neighborhood, editing the image with red marks in post production as a reaction to the hostile environment escalating both in the city and across the country. By using a drone to photograph the thermometer-like image Octavious was also able to capture the landscape surrounding his street intervention, adding a deeper context to his work by providing a glimpse of Chicago’s own streets.

“While photographing a street in my neighborhood from above, I immediately picked out the shape which resembled that of a classic glass thermometer,” said Octavious. “As I painted over the asphalt with red in post, it started to take on something more to me. With everything that’s going on right now in this country, and the violence happening on our streets, the boiling point is at an all-time high. I think while creating this, I had a few things on my mind.”

You can see more of Octavious’ work on his Instagram. (via This Isn’t Happiness)

See related posts on Colossal about , .

Pilot Captures Amazing Thunderstorm Photo at 37,000 Feet Over the Pacific Ocean 

storm-1

Photo © Santiago Borja, used with permission.

Over the last few years we’ve seen our fair share of storm and lightning photographs, but this shot from Ecuador Airlines pilot Santiago Borja might top them all. Taken from a Boeing 767-300 cockpit at the precise moment of a lightning flash, the image captures a powerful thunderstorm forming above the Pacific Ocean just south of Panama. A difficult shot considering the turbulent weather and near pitch-dark setting.

“I like this photo so much because you can feel the amazing size of the storm and its power,” he tells the Washington Post. “But at the same time it’s wonderful how peacefully you can fly around it in still air without touching it.”

Borja also shared a second thunderstorm photo with Colossal taken in October of last year along the coast of Venezuela. You can see more of his travel and storm photos on Instagram.

storm-2

Photo © Santiago Borja, used with permission.

Update: Photographer Kevin O’ Mara shares his own aerial thunderstorm photo taken over Alabama in 2013.

See related posts on Colossal about , , , , .

Page 1 of 51234...»