Tag Archives: animals

Shipwrecks and Deep Ocean Scenes Encapsulated Inside Translucent Whale Sculptures 

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Image provided by Isana Yamada

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Image provided by Isana Yamada

Japanese artist Isana Yamada' s project Samsara is composed of six translucent whales mounted on thin pedestals that give each of the sculptures an illusion of movement. The whales, illuminated from within, provide a window to strange worlds locked inside their resin-coated bodies: churning submarine volcanoes, fluffy white clouds, and even polar bear skeletons that float within. The project, staged at Tokyo University of the Arts, references the circle of existence found in Buddhist traditions with each whale displaying a separate scene. The whale that represents the human dimension contains a sunken sailboat, imagery that symbolizes a difficult voyage or plight.

Yamada’s work will also be shown in an exhibition of sculptural works at the Artcomplex Center of Tokyo from March 1st through 6th. You can see more of his work on his Facebook page here. (via My Modern Met)

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Images by @muzintansaki

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Image provided by Isana Yamada

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Image provided by Isana Yamada

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Image provided by Isana Yamada

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The Black and White Anthropomorphic Illustrations of David Álvarez 

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All images courtesy of David Álvarez. This image was made in collaboration with Julia D

David Álvarez produces soft illustrations that seem to glow despite their often limited color palette of black and white. The graphite scenes depict animals either interacting with or as humans, often donning elaborate garments while engaged in activities such as dancing or reading books.

“I always found it amazing how artists worked in the earlier days, I think of the technological limitations and how it took talent, skill, and patience to develop works of great complexity,” Álvarez told Colossal. “That was one reason why, since I was a student, I felt interest in figurative drawing for handling light and shadow. At school I discovered graphite and its possibilities. When I started working on my own I noticed that my personality and my way of working suited that particular technique.”

Mesoamerica is one of the illustrator’s favorite subjects to produce works around. Recently he created a book surrounding Mesoamerican myth titled Ancient Night that follows a rabbit and opossum’s adventures with pulque, a fermented prehispanic beverage.

Seen here are a number of collaborations with illustrator Julia Diaz. You can explore more of Álvarez’s illustrations on his Instagram and blog.

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David Álvarez in collaboration with Julia D

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The Dense Microcosmic Worlds of Painter Robert S. Connett 

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“MICROVERSE II” (2015)

Since he was a child, Robert S. Connett was fascinated by nature. And not just any type of nature, but the tiny worlds that quietly exist without being discovered. They thrive under rocks and under microscopes and Connett was the kid who went out looking for them, bringing home everything from spiders and earwigs to snakes. This perhaps explains the self-taught painter’s equally fascinating worlds he conjures on a canvas, often in painstaking detail.

These “underworlds,” as Connett describes them, are often comprised of densely populated organisms. Some look like a droplet of seawater under a microscope. Others resemble a Where’s Waldo version of our amazing animal kingdom. Any could be a small square of Hieronymus Bosch’s “The Garden of Earthly Delights,” magnified hundreds of times.

The organisms are a combination of accurate depictions based on scientific observation, as well as plucked from the artist’s own mind. They are worlds that Connett himself would want to walk into and we can’t blame him! His most recent work—a total of 7 paintings—will be shown at the upcoming annual Los Angeles Art Show that runs from January 27 – 31, 2016. You’ll find Connett’s work at the Copro Gallery booth in a section aptly titled “Littletopia”. Many of his pieces are also available as prints. (via Hi-Fructose)

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detail of “MICROVERSE II” (2015)

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“MICROCOSMIC GARDEN” (2015)

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“MICROCOSMIC GARDEN,” detail

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“STAR FISH” (2015)

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Sea Flowers (2014)

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New Portraits of Fashionably Dressed Wildlife and Floral Bouquets by Miguel Vallinas 

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In his long-running portrait series Second Skins, artist Miguel Vallinas (previously) uses photographic portraits of wildlife as a starting point to construct fictional wardrobes that he imagines each animal might wear if it were dressed as a human. Vallinas has an uncanny ability to select the perfect colors and textures for each outfit he photographs, bestowing the animals with a clear sense of character and an unusual authenticity.

On the surface, Second Skins is a humorous series of portraits guaranteed for a smile, but dig a bit deeper and Vallinas suggests the images reveal a more about human nature than the animal kingdom. Specifically, how we perceive people based on appearance and how we create narratives in our mind based wholly on what we see. Vallinas says he is also examining elements of self-perception, specifically “what we believe we are, what others think we are, what we really are, and what we would like to be.”

For his latest body of work titled Roots, Vallinas again explores identity through similarly dressed boquets of flowers or plants matched with remarkably fitting attire. You can see much more on his website.

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Fantastical Paintings of Animals Within Post-Apocalyptic Environments by Martin Wittfooth 

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Martin Wittfooth transposes the temperament we typically associate with large animals to those much smaller, painting foxes and birds as the heroic victors of this works while making larger animals much more passive and calm. Each of his paintings feature these creatures in environments that deviate from the peaceful surrounding we would expect—trash and decay littering the the ground while smog fills the sky.

“As a species we share a pretty significant degree of similar reactions to the natural world: there are forms in nature that we seem to have innate responses to,” said Wittfooth in an interview with beinArt. “Like a sense of awe or respect for large mammals, and revulsion for spiders and snakes. I’m interested in this kind of shared pattern recognition and instinctive responses. I’m pretty invested in trying to imbue my paintings with some sense of ‘presence’ and hence am working with subject matter that can impart an emotional reading of it, not just a rational (strictly observing) analysis.”

The Brooklyn-based painter’s work is included with 27 other artists fascinated with the wild form in the new book Juxtapoz Wild. You can see more of Wittfooth’s work on his Facebook page here. (via Juxtapoz)

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Surreal Beasts Carrying the Weight of the World by Wang Ruilin 

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DREAMS-Crocodile, 2013. Copper & paint, 120×46×120 cm. Photo by Zou Shengwu.

Beijing-based artist Wang Ruilin (previously) is known for his gentle depictions of animals both real and fictional that appear to carry the heavy weight of mountains, oceans, and entire miniature worlds on their backs. The smooth and sinuous copper sculptures borrow from elements of Eastern classical painting merged with Ruilin’s personal experiences and interpretations of his dreams. The artist frequently shares a mix of old and new artworks on Behance, and you can see more on his website.

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DREAMS-Crocodile, detail.

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DREAMS-Crocodile, studio view.

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DREAMS-FAWN, 2015. Copper & paint.

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DREAMS-FAWN (small size), 2015. Copper & paint.

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DREAMS-FAWN, detail.

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DREAMS-Mountain&Sea No.2, 2013. Copper & paint.

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DREAMS-Mountain & Sea No.1, detail.

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DREAMS-Mountain & Sea No.1, detail.

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DREAMS-Mountain & Sea No.1, 2013. Copper and paint.

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Horse.Play – No.3, 2011. 120×95×35 cm, copper and paint. Photo by Zou Shengwu.

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Horse.Play – No.3, detail.

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New Dreamlike Watercolor Paintings of Children Communing with Animals by Elicia Edijanto 

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Indonesian artist Elicia Edijanto (previously) has long been fascinated in the bond between animals and children. In her stark black watercolor paintings she depicts predatory beasts like cheetahs and bears as having a direct and intimate bond with children who accompany the animals as companions in misty, haze-filled landscapes. “Nature inspires me. My subjects are often children and animal because they are sincere, unprejudiced and unpretentious. There’s an innate relationship between them,” says the Edijanto.

Collected here are a few of her most recent paintings, several of which are currently on view at Snap! Orlando through the end of the month, and a number of her paintings are available as prints through Lumarte.

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