animals

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Art Photography

Oil Paintings That Integrate Oversized Animals Into Found Vintage Photographs by Anja Wülfing

June 30, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

Anja Wulfing adds large animals into the black and white scenes of found vintage photographs, turning the attention away from the somber faces of its subjects and to the creatures that pose quite naturally behind their backs. The surprising inclusions are painted in by Wulfing, and often take the form of birds—such as crows, owls, ducks, and the occasional rooster. The animals either join the members of the photograph or merge with its occupants, sometimes replacing the heads of those posing to create hybrid and humorous creatures.

You can see more of Wulfing’s subtle animal additions on her Instagram and Behance. (via Lustik)

 

 



Photography

Photos of Japanese Playground Equipment at Night by Kito Fujio

June 29, 2017

Johnny Strategy

In 2005 Kito Fujio quit his job as an office worker and became a freelance photographer. And for the last 12 years he’s been exploring various overlooked pockets of Japan like the rooftops of department stores, which typically have games and rides to entertain children while their parents are shopping. More recently, he’s taken notice of the many interesting cement-molded play equipment that dots playgrounds around Japan.

The sculptural, cement-molded play equipment is often modeled after animals that children would be familiar with. But they also take on the form of robots, abstract geometric forms and sometimes even household appliances. Fujio’s process is not entirely clear, but it appears he visits the parks at night and lights up the equipment from the inside, but also from the outside, which often creates an ominous feel to the harmless equipment.

Speaking of harmless, the nostalgic cement molds have been ubiquitous throughout Japan and, for the most part, free of safety concerns. That’s because the cement requires almost no maintenance; maybe just a fresh coat of paint every few years. The telephone (pictured below) is evidence of how long ago the equipment was probably made.

The sculptural cement equipment was a style favored by Isamu Noguchi, who designed his first landscape for children in 1933. Many of his sculptural playground equipment can be found in Sapporo but also stateside at Piedmont Park in Atlanta.

Fujio has made his photographs available as part of a series of photobooks (each priced at 800 yen) that he sells on his website. (Syndicated from Spoon & Tamago)

 

 



Art Craft

Superb Cut Paper Artworks by Pippa Dyrlaga

June 21, 2017

Christopher Jobson

All images © Pippa Dyrlaga.

Yorkshire-based artist and printmaker Pippa Dyrlaga has a lovely portfolio of cut paper works. Each piece is cut from a single sheet of paper and is infused with a rich pattern of repetitive cuts that form the scaly details of twisting snakes to the patterned plumage of parrots or the fur of cats. Dyrlaga has degrees in Contemporary Art Practice and Art and Design and Curation from Leeds Metropolitan University and now works on a variety of freelance and commissioned projects. She also translates many of her pieces into limited edition screen prints which she sells in her shop. (via Yatzer)

 

 



Illustration Science

Playful Watercolors Illustrate the Many Classifications of the Animal Kingdom

June 15, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

Illustrator and amateur naturalist Kelsey Oseid is focused on detailing the natural world, illustrating the animal kingdom’s many classes and orders on posters created with watercolor and gouache. The posters highlight more known orders such as Carnivora and Rodentia, while also showcasing the diversity of animals in lesser known orders like the Chondrichthyes and Artiodactyla. Oseid numerically labels the more common names of each animal in the footer of her works, pointing out where one can find the capybara, naked mole rat, and hammerhead shark.

The Minneapolis-based illustrator’s first book, What We See in the Stars: An Illustrated Tour of the Night Sky, comes out September 26 from Ten Speed Press. You can take a look at Oseid’s sketches and inspiration for her illustrations on her Instagram, and grab a poster for yourself on her Etsy. (via My Modern Met)

 

 



Art Craft

New Balloon Sculptures Depicting Animals and Insects by Masayoshi Matsumoto

May 30, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

Proboscis monkey

Masayoshi Matsumoto (previously here and here) doesn’t twist up your average balloon animal creations. Instead, the Japanese artist produces larger than life beetle larva and spider crabs, creating latex masterpieces that blow away the simplistic balloon animals we’ve come to expect. Multi-colored and not bound to any particular species, the works are incredibly realistic interpretations of the animals they imitate, making the requests at your child’s next birthday particularly bizarre. You can see more of his insects and animals on his Facebook, Tumblr, and Instagram.

Capybara

House fly

Beetle larva

Siamang

Jumping spider

Nautilus

Spider

Snail

Termite

 

 



Photography

Giants: A Black and White Series Captures the Complexity of the Humpback Whale

May 30, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

Over the last three years photographer Jem Cresswell has photographed humpback whales during their annual migration to Vava’u, Tonga, swimming with the great creatures in the vast waters of the southern Pacific Ocean. Cresswell’s series Giants captures the individual personality of the great whales, each of which seem to pose specifically for his underwater camera.

“I was initially drawn to the whales’ gentle nature, sheer size and the feeling of insignificance in their presence,” said Cresswell. “Over the past 3 years returning to Tonga, I have sought to capture intimate portraits of these complex and conscious animals, bringing the viewer into the world of these mystical giants.”

In addition to being intrigued by the animals’ size, the Australian-based artist is also fascinated by their brains. In 2006, spindle cells, which were only thought to be present in humans and great apes, were also found to exist within the brains of humpback whales. These cells, which are tied to social organization, empathy, and intuition, were found to be more than three times as prevalent in humpback whales than they were in humans.

This sense of humanness is one of the reasons that Cresswell chooses to shoot his underwater subjects in black and white. “The main focus of the project concerns the whale’s sense of character and consciousness,” he explained to Colossal. “To me, black and white avoids distraction and draws the viewer directly to the subject. Black and white also has a sense of timelessness to it, which I feel represents how long these creatures have been around for.”

Cresswell will continue photographing humpback whales in the future, but at the present he is taking a break to work on a new series focused on Australia’s Great Barrier Reef. You can get a behind-the-scenes perspective of Cresswell’s underwater shoots on his Instagram and in the short video below. (via My Modern Met)

 

 

 



Art Craft

Endangered Species Cut from Paper by Patrick Cabral

May 11, 2017

Christopher Jobson

As part of an ongoing series to highlight various endangered species, Manila-based paper artist Patrick Cabral created these amazing cut paper portraits of tigers, pandas, pangolins, and other threatened animals. The multi-layered works are cut by hand and incorporate decorative flourishes and patterns into the the face of each animal. Working since last November, Cabral envisioned the series as a way to support endangered animals, and he’s donating half of the proceeds from the sale of each sculpture to WWF Philippines. You can see more from the series on Instagram.

 

 

A Colossal

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