animals

Posts tagged
with animals



Illustration Science

Playful Watercolors Illustrate the Many Classifications of the Animal Kingdom

June 15, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

Illustrator and amateur naturalist Kelsey Oseid is focused on detailing the natural world, illustrating the animal kingdom’s many classes and orders on posters created with watercolor and gouache. The posters highlight more known orders such as Carnivora and Rodentia, while also showcasing the diversity of animals in lesser known orders like the Chondrichthyes and Artiodactyla. Oseid numerically labels the more common names of each animal in the footer of her works, pointing out where one can find the capybara, naked mole rat, and hammerhead shark.

The Minneapolis-based illustrator’s first book, What We See in the Stars: An Illustrated Tour of the Night Sky, comes out September 26 from Ten Speed Press. You can take a look at Oseid’s sketches and inspiration for her illustrations on her Instagram, and grab a poster for yourself on her Etsy. (via My Modern Met)

 

 



Art Craft

New Balloon Sculptures Depicting Animals and Insects by Masayoshi Matsumoto

May 30, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

Proboscis monkey

Masayoshi Matsumoto (previously here and here) doesn’t twist up your average balloon animal creations. Instead, the Japanese artist produces larger than life beetle larva and spider crabs, creating latex masterpieces that blow away the simplistic balloon animals we’ve come to expect. Multi-colored and not bound to any particular species, the works are incredibly realistic interpretations of the animals they imitate, making the requests at your child’s next birthday particularly bizarre. You can see more of his insects and animals on his Facebook, Tumblr, and Instagram.

Capybara

House fly

Beetle larva

Siamang

Jumping spider

Nautilus

Spider

Snail

Termite

 

 



Photography

Giants: A Black and White Series Captures the Complexity of the Humpback Whale

May 30, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

Over the last three years photographer Jem Cresswell has photographed humpback whales during their annual migration to Vava’u, Tonga, swimming with the great creatures in the vast waters of the southern Pacific Ocean. Cresswell’s series Giants captures the individual personality of the great whales, each of which seem to pose specifically for his underwater camera.

“I was initially drawn to the whales’ gentle nature, sheer size and the feeling of insignificance in their presence,” said Cresswell. “Over the past 3 years returning to Tonga, I have sought to capture intimate portraits of these complex and conscious animals, bringing the viewer into the world of these mystical giants.”

In addition to being intrigued by the animals’ size, the Australian-based artist is also fascinated by their brains. In 2006, spindle cells, which were only thought to be present in humans and great apes, were also found to exist within the brains of humpback whales. These cells, which are tied to social organization, empathy, and intuition, were found to be more than three times as prevalent in humpback whales than they were in humans.

This sense of humanness is one of the reasons that Cresswell chooses to shoot his underwater subjects in black and white. “The main focus of the project concerns the whale’s sense of character and consciousness,” he explained to Colossal. “To me, black and white avoids distraction and draws the viewer directly to the subject. Black and white also has a sense of timelessness to it, which I feel represents how long these creatures have been around for.”

Cresswell will continue photographing humpback whales in the future, but at the present he is taking a break to work on a new series focused on Australia’s Great Barrier Reef. You can get a behind-the-scenes perspective of Cresswell’s underwater shoots on his Instagram and in the short video below. (via My Modern Met)

 

 

 



Art Craft

Endangered Species Cut from Paper by Patrick Cabral

May 11, 2017

Christopher Jobson

As part of an ongoing series to highlight various endangered species, Manila-based paper artist Patrick Cabral created these amazing cut paper portraits of tigers, pandas, pangolins, and other threatened animals. The multi-layered works are cut by hand and incorporate decorative flourishes and patterns into the the face of each animal. Working since last November, Cabral envisioned the series as a way to support endangered animals, and he’s donating half of the proceeds from the sale of each sculpture to WWF Philippines. You can see more from the series on Instagram.

 

 



Photography

Photos of Animals Retouched to Look Like Real-Life Minecraft Creatures

May 5, 2017

Christopher Jobson

Jakarta-based designer and retoucher Aditya Aryanto posed the question: what would the blocky digital creatures in Minecraft look like if they actually walked the Earth? The result is a totally absurd series of retouched photographs titled Minecraft in Real Life. Aryanto snagged several royalty-free images from Pixabay and Unsplash and Photoshopped them into the familiar cubic beings. You can see more from the series on Behance. (via PetaPixel)

 

 



Photography

Affinity: Compelling Studio Portraits of Animals Photographed Against a Stark Black Backdrop by Brad Wilson

May 2, 2017

Christopher Jobson

All photos © Brad Wilson

From lumbering African elephants to diminutive cockatoos, fine art photographer Brad Wilson appears to look into the soul of unusual animals from the far reaches of the planet, isolating each bird, mammal, or reptile against a deep black backdrop. The images are part of the Santa Fe-based photographer’s ongoing Affinity series that explores human’s relationship with animals, both positive and negative, while highlighting the fragility of each subject with the aid of soft studio lighting. From his artist statement:

In the midst of our modern human civilization with all its technological complexities, animals still remain stark symbols of a simpler life and a wilderness lost. Perhaps these images can stand as a testament to this other fading world, and remind us, despite the pronounced feeling of isolation that too often characterizes our contemporary existence, that we are not alone, we are not separate – we are part of a beautifully rich and interconnected diversity of life.

Wilson is represented by PhotoEye Gallery, and you can see more of his work on Instagram and in the 2014 book Wild Life. (via Colossal Submissions)

 

 



Design

Geometric Wood Toys by Designer Mat Random

April 26, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

Argentina-based toy designer Mat Random has designed a new geometric wood figure as a follow-up to his previous piece The Feline, another posable toy that he has named The Simian. Due to similarly placed joints for the animals’ legs and head, parts can be swapped between the two breeds to create an entirely new hybridized creature. Each low poly work can also be posed on two or four legs by maneuvering the object’s nine components, adding a puzzle-like quality to the wooden toys. You can see more of Random’s designs on his website and Behance.

 

 

A Colossal

Highlight

Artist Prints