Tag Archives: animals

New Dreamlike Watercolor Paintings of Children Communing with Animals by Elicia Edijanto 

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Indonesian artist Elicia Edijanto (previously) has long been fascinated in the bond between animals and children. In her stark black watercolor paintings she depicts predatory beasts like cheetahs and bears as having a direct and intimate bond with children who accompany the animals as companions in misty, haze-filled landscapes. “Nature inspires me. My subjects are often children and animal because they are sincere, unprejudiced and unpretentious. There’s an innate relationship between them,” says the Edijanto.

Collected here are a few of her most recent paintings, several of which are currently on view at Snap! Orlando through the end of the month, and a number of her paintings are available as prints through Lumarte.

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New Calligraphy Animals by Andrew Fox 

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With just a few strokes of his calligraphy pen, illustrator Andrew Fox creates everything from animals and insects to people and robots—figures that seem bristling with personality despite their simplicity. We explored Fox’s work here on Colossal last year, and if you’re tempted to try these yourself he’s since published a book: Learn to Draw Calligraphy Animals. You can see more of his work over on Behance and Society6.

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Hilarious Winners of the First Annual ‘Comedy Wildlife Photography Awards’ 

WINNER---Julian-Rad
Winner, Julian Rad / Comedy Wildlife Photography Awards

There are quite a few annual wildlife and nature photography awards these days, and it’s nearly impossible to keep up with them all, but if there’s room for just one more distinction, I suppose it’s the Comedy Wildlife Photography Awards. Founded this year by wildlife photographer Paul Joynson-Hicks, the competition is open to anyone with outrageous and weird photos of animals doing, well, funny stuff. Collected here are some of the winners and highlights of the 2015 competition, you can see more here. (via Photojojo, My Modern Met)

SILVER-RUNNER-UP---William-Richardson
Silver Runner Up, William Richardson / Comedy Wildlife Photography Awards

Highly-Commended---Alison-Buttigieg
Highly Commended, Alison Buttigieg / Comedy Wildlife Photography Awards

Highly-Commended---Charlie-Davidson
Highly Commended, Charlie Davidson / Comedy Wildlife Photography Awards

Highly-Commended---Graham-McGeorge
Highly Commended, Graham McGeorge / Comedy Wildlife Photography Awards

Highly-Commended---Julie-Hunt
Highly Commended, Julie Hunt / Comedy Wildlife Photography Awards

Highly-Commended---Marc-Mol
Highly Commended, Marc Mol / Comedy Wildlife Photography Awards

Highly-Commended---Tony-Dilger
Tony Dilger / Comedy Wildlife Photography Awards

Highly-Commended---Yuzuru-Masuda
Highly Commended, Yuzuru Masuda / Comedy Wildlife Photography Awards

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New Surrealist Sculptures by Ellen Jewett Effortlessly Combine Animals With Their Fantastical Surroundings 

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Ellen Jewett (previously) effortlessly blends animals with elements from their environments, creating ceramic pieces that often balance unexpected species together in a singular piece. Each work is highly detailed—flowers, leaves, and vines wrapping themselves around animals from coyotes to chameleons.

By focusing on negative spaces within the animals’ bodies, Jewett strips away the weight of her objects, a quality that is usually inextricably linked to the medium of sculpture. She constructs her ceramic pieces using an additive technique, beginning with the innermost parts of the sculptures and layering outward. As periphery components of the animals’ surroundings are added to the piece, a narrative begins to form. These additional pieces Jewett describes as being beautiful, grotesque, or fantastical and add to the object’s exploration of domestication, death, growth, visibility, and wildness.

Jewett’s materials are just as important as her process—only using clay, paints, finishes, and glazes that are free from toxic properties. In addition to being toxic free, she also attempts to source locally and naturally whenever possible. You can keep updated on the Canadian artist’s new work on her Facebook page, and several new pieces are currently available.

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Wire Animal Sculptures that Look Like Scribbled Pencil Drawings by David Oliveira 

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Artist David Oliveira (previously) works with wire in an unconventional way by cutting and twisting the material into sculptures that could be mistaken for 2D sketches. Despite the apparent difficulty of shaping wire into a recognizable form, Oliveira manages to achieve uncanny proportions of his animal subjects in this series of sculptures from 2014. Viewed from one angle the pieces could be mistaken for a chaotic jumble, but a shift in perspective reveals the squinting eyes of lions, or the spread wings of a pelican. The Lisbon-based artist also creates vast interior installations of birds and thoughtful examinations of the human form. You can scroll through an archive of his work over on Facebook. (via Cross Connect)

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Cruelty-Free Knit Anatomy Specimens by Emily Stoneking 

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Vermont-based knitter Emily Stoneking runs an anatomical knitting brand called aKNITomy where she transforms fluffy skeins of yarn into the anatomical details of rats, frogs, people, and other creatures. Stoneking—who is admittedly not a scientist—likes to approximate the form and style seen in most anatomical illustrations with clear colors and distinct forms that may not be 100% accurate but are fun to look at nonetheless.

The specimens are available as both completed pieces and downloadable patterns, so you can ditch the formaldehyde and get a PDF knitting guide. (via IFLScience)

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