Tag Archives: animals

New Animal and Insect Assemblages Made from Repurposed Objects by Edouard Martinet

martinet-1
Butterfly. 25″ x 14″ x 22″ H. Legs: bike brake parts, pieces of windshield wipers, bike chains. Abdomen: old acetylene light tank. Thorax: car suspension part, small spoon parts, cream chargers. Head: headlights, bike parts. Butterfly trunk: clock springs. Hair: pieces of a typewriter daisy wheel. Antennae: brake cables, drawer knobs.

martinet-2Butterfly, detail.

martinet-3
Butterfly, detail.

martinet-4Rhinoceros beetle. 13″ x 11″ x 6″ H. Legs: bike brake parts, bike derailleur chain, bike chain ring. Head and horn: small bike brake, pieces of a typewriter daisy wheel. Antennae: small bike parts. Thorax: shoe tree, bike Luxor headlight. Abdomen: motorbike light, shell-shaped drawer handles.

martinet-5
Rhinoceros beetle, detail.

martinet-6
Three-spined stickleback. 34″ x 5″ x 13″ H. Body: moped fenders and chain guards. Bones: tablespoons. Gills: car door parts. Fins: cake tins, fish slices, compasses. Tail: motorbike silencer, fish slices. Eyes: flashlights. Head: Solex front fenders.

martinet-7Moth. 31″ x 16″ x 7″ H. Wings: moped chain guards (rusted and patinated). Abdomen: motorbike headlights. Thorax: very old car headlamp. Legs: large upholstery tacks, car boot hinges, pieces of windshield wipers, bike brake parts, chain guards. Head: old rear position lamps, bike parts, pieces of a daisy wheel. Butterfly trunk: clock springs. Antennae: aluminium heating resistor.

martinet-8Moth, detail.

martinet-9
Wasp. 11″ x 6″ x 16″ H. Abdomen: steel tips for boots, bike headlights. Thorax and head: steel tips and bells from bikes and typewriters. Eyes: vintage watch case. Antennae: spectacles arms. Legs: bike brakes, bike chain, spoon handles. Wings: glass.

martinet-10
Red ant. 25″ x 16″ x 9″ H. Thorax and head: sauce spoons, car parts. Eyes: marbles. Abdomen: bike or motorbike headlights. Antennae: small bike chains. Legs: cream chargers, brake parts, chains, alarm clock feet, spoon handles.

martinet-11
Dragonfly. 37″ x 49″ x 15″ H. Abdomen: patinated copper/brass bicycle pump, car horn part, parts of old acetylene bike lights (at the ends). Thorax: two motorbike rear lights, shell-shaped drawer handles, big upholstery tacks. Head: car or lorry old stop lights, parts of acetylene bike lights, parts of a daisy wheel for typewriter (hair from the mouth). Legs: tubes, bike cable guide, wing nuts, wire. Wings: umbrella ribs, wire, wire netting for hen coops.

martinet-12
Dragonfly, detail.

When looking at these perfectly assembled sculptures by French artist Edouard Martinet (previously) it’s difficult to believe the raw materials he used ever existed in another form. Yet every head, thorax, leg, wing, and eye from these assorted creatures was once part of a car, bicycle, typewriter, or other found object. Reading through his material lists it becomes clear how completely thorough and judicious Martinet is in selecting the perfect objects to realize his vision, truly a master of his craft. Via Sladmore Contemporary:

His degree of virtuosity is unique: he does not solder or weld parts. His sculptures are screwed together. This gives his forms an extra level of visual richness – but not in a way that merely conveys the dry precision of, say, a watchmaker. There is an X-Factor here, a graceful wit, a re-imagining of the obvious in which a beautifully finished object glows not with perfection, but with character, with new life. Martinet takes about a month to make a sculpture and will often work on two or three pieces at the same time. It took him just four weeks to make his first sculpture and 17 years for his most recent completion!

If you want to see these new pieces up close, Martinet opens a new exhibition at Sladmore Contemporary in London, November 27 through January 31, 2014. You can see several additional new works on his website.

See related posts on Colossal about , , , .

Cats Waiting for Fishermen to Return

10067843263300c120

Love this photo of what appears to be cats waiting for fishermen to return to port. The photographer is unknown but it appears to have first been posted here about two years ago. (via Classic Pics, Stellar)

See related posts on Colossal about , , .

A Deadly Alkaline Lake in Africa Turns Animals into Calcified Statues

nick-1
Calcified Fish Eagle, Lake Natron, 2012

nick-2
Calcified Bat II, Lake Natron, 2012

nick-3
Calcified Swallow, Lake Natron, 2012

nick-4
Calcified Dove, Lake Natron, 2012

nick-5
Calcified Flamingo, Lake Natron, 2012

nick-6
Calcified Songbird, Lake Natron, 2012

Lake Natron in northern Tanzania is one of the harshest environments on Earth. Temperatures in the lake can rise to 140 °F (60 °C) and the alkalinity is between pH 9 and pH 10.5, almost as alkaline as ammonia. Animals who enter the water are almost certainly doomed, save certain kinds of fish that have evolved to survive in such a caustic environment.

While working Africa photographer Nick Brandt stopped by the lake to discover several dead animals on the shoreline. Birds and other small mammals that end up in the water gradually become calcified, turned to stone in the deadly water. Brandt tells NewScientist, “I could not help but photograph them. No one knows for certain exactly how they die, but it appears that the extreme reflective nature of the lake’s surface confuses them, and like birds crashing into plate glass windows, they crash into the lake.”

book

These photos and many more are included in Brandt’s new book, Across the Ravaged Land, a third and final volume of photography documenting the disappearance of animals in Eastern Africa. All photos copyright Nick Brandt, courtesy of Hasted Kraeutler Gallery. (via My Modern Met)

See related posts on Colossal about , , .

Wild Animals Stalk the Streets of a Small Town in Finland at Night

night-1

night-2

night-3

night-4

night-5

One night while walking the streets of Porvoo, Finland with a camera in hand, photographer Mikko Lagerstedt (previously) captured the silhouette of a large cat off in the distance lit feintly from behind by a street lamp. Struck by the image, he conceived of a new series called Night Animals, where all kinds of wildlife would prowl the streets of this small Finnish town at night. As much as I want to tell you he raided the local zoo to liberate an ostrich, the images are all composites of two photos, an animal and backdrop, both shot by Lagerstedt. If you liked this also check out Shauna Richardson’s Crochetdermy.

See related posts on Colossal about , , , .

Minimals: Modular Toy Animals by Sebastián Burga

minimals-1

minimals-2

minimals-3

minimals-4

minimals-5

Minimals are a new line of modular toy models currently in development by designer Sebastián Burga. The designer has been working on the wacky looking animals since 2008 and they recently won a Silver A Design Award at the A’Design Awards. While it doesn’t look like they are currently available for purchase, you can see a lot more over on Facebook and Behance.

See related posts on Colossal about , .

Second Skins: Fashionably Dressed Animals Photographed by Miguel Vallinas

skins-3

skins-2

skins-1

skins-4

skins-5

skins-6

skins-7

skins-8

skins-9

skins-10

When first encountering this body of photographs Madrid-based advertising and industrial photographer Miguel Vallinas it’s easy to view it as a familiar “animals dressed as people” project. But as you look closer you realize it’s quite a bit more than that. Aside from the solid retouching, lighting and overall execution, Vallinas took this anthropomorphic project a bit further and imagined what the fully-realized wardrobe of each animal might look like if it were wearing human clothes.

Titled Segundas Pieles (Second Skins), the ongoing series includes some 50+ animals whose personalities seem to be perfectly amplified by their pitch-perfect attire, making the portaits just a bit more human than animal. I’m pretty sure the hipster bird in the cardigan works at a coffee shop by my house. The work is a sister project to another series called simply Pieles where the photographer portrays himself in a wide range of professions. (via lustik)

See related posts on Colossal about , , , , , .

An Elephant-Octopus Mural on the Streets of London by Alexis Diaz

octo-1

octo-2

octo-3

octo-4

octo-5

This awesome hybrid elephant-octopus was just completed this week by Puerto Rican artist Alexis Diaz. Comprised of thousands of tiny brushstrokes, the mural took a week to paint and you can see it yourself on Hanbury Street off Brick Lane. Chicago artist Phineas X. Jones also conceived of an “octophant” which has had numerous incarnations over the years. (via StreetArtNews)

See related posts on Colossal about , , , , .

Page 7 of 20«...6789...»