Tag Archives: animals

Unraveling Animals by Jaume Montserrat

emptyland-jaume (8)

emptyland-jaume (5)

emptyland-jaume (6)

emptyland-jaume (7)

emptyland-jaume (9)

emptyland-jaume (1)

emptyland-jaume (2)

emptyland-jaume (3)

I tend to have weird dreams too when sleeping on a plane, but nothing comes close to those of Jaume Montserrat. While on a flight home the Barcelona based illustrator dreamt he was on a Noah’s Ark-like island and “there was only one animal from each specimen. All of them were empty, asexual and immortal. They didn’t need to hunt, nor were they scared of being hunted – so there was a perfect symbiosis.” And thus came the inspiration for his series “Emptyland,” a surreal representation of unraveling animals often depicted as being intertwined with each other. At first glance the drawings are a little creepy, but upon closer observation there’s actually something very peaceful about them. (via ghost in the machine and iGNANT)

See related posts on Colossal about , , .

Origami Artist Sipho Mabona Will Attempt to Fold a Life-Sized Elephant from a Single Piece of Paper

elephant

Swiss origami master Sipho Mabona (previously) plans to fold a massive life-sized elephant from a specially produced 2,500 square foot (125 sqm) sheet of paper at the Art Museum in Beromünster, Switzerland. Titled White Elephant, the artist is currently raising funds for the endeavor through Indiegogo so he can fund the production of paper and hopefully film the project in a timelapse video similar to the animation above. Mabona is offering a number of rewards such as origami instructions and original folded pieces including his famous koi and swallows.

origami-1

origami-2

origami-3

bull

Learn more about White Elephant over on Indiegogo.

See related posts on Colossal about , , .

A Herd of 99 Lifelike Animals Drink From a Pool at QAGOMA

heritage-1Heritage, 2013. 99 life-sized replicas of animals, water, sand, drip mechanism. Dimensions variable. Photograph: Natasha Harth, Queensland Art Gallery | Gallery of Modern Art.

heritage-2Heritage, 2013. 99 life-sized replicas of animals, water, sand, drip mechanism. Dimensions variable. Photograph: Natasha Harth, Queensland Art Gallery | Gallery of Modern Art.

heritage-3Heritage, 2013. 99 life-sized replicas of animals, water, sand, drip mechanism. Dimensions variable. Photograph: Natasha Harth, Queensland Art Gallery | Gallery of Modern Art.

heritage-4Heritage, 2013. 99 life-sized replicas of animals, water, sand, drip mechanism. Dimensions variable. Photograph: Natasha Harth, Queensland Art Gallery | Gallery of Modern Art.

heritage-9Heritage, 2013. 99 life-sized replicas of animals, water, sand, drip mechanism. Dimensions variable. Photograph: Mark Sherwood, Queensland Art Gallery | Gallery of Modern Art.

heritage-5
Head On, 2006. 99 life-sized replicas of wolves and glass wall. Wolves: gauze, resin, and hide. Dimensions variable. Photograph: Natasha Harth, Queensland Art Gallery | Gallery of Modern Art.

heritage-6
Head On, 2006. 99 life-sized replicas of wolves and glass wall. Wolves: gauze, resin, and hide. Dimensions variable. Photograph: Natasha Harth, Queensland Art Gallery | Gallery of Modern Art.

headon-1
Head On, 2006. 99 life-sized replicas of wolves and glass wall. Wolves: gauze, resin, and hide. Dimensions variable. Photograph: Natasha Harth, Queensland Art Gallery | Gallery of Modern Art.

headon-2
Head On, 2006. 99 life-sized replicas of wolves and glass wall. Wolves: gauze, resin, and hide. Dimensions variable. Photograph: Natasha Harth, Queensland Art Gallery | Gallery of Modern Art.

heritage-7
Artist Cai Guo-Qiang sculpting an animal for Heritage. Photograph: Cai Canhuang.

heritage-8
Artist Cai Guo-Qiang sculpting an animal for Heritage. Photograph: Cai Canhuang.

Inspired by a trip to Stradbroke Island in Australia back in 2011, artist Cai Guo-Qiang began work on his newest large-scale installation, Heritage, a flock of 99 life-size replicas of wild animals including giraffes, pandas, lions, tigers, and kangaroos drinking from a pool of blue water. The piece is included along with several additional artworks as part of his first solo exhibition in Australia, Falling Back to Earth, at Queensland Art Gallery | Gallery of Modern Art in South Brisbane.

Also included in the exhibition is Guo-Qiang’s famous airborne cascade of 99 wolves titled Head On, where the animals seem to launch themselves into the air only to crash into a large glass wall and begin the cycle again. You can see more behind-the-scenes photos in the video above and on the artists blog. Falling Back to Earth runs through May 11, 2014.

See related posts on Colossal about , , .

New Animal and Insect Assemblages Made from Repurposed Objects by Edouard Martinet

martinet-1
Butterfly. 25″ x 14″ x 22″ H. Legs: bike brake parts, pieces of windshield wipers, bike chains. Abdomen: old acetylene light tank. Thorax: car suspension part, small spoon parts, cream chargers. Head: headlights, bike parts. Butterfly trunk: clock springs. Hair: pieces of a typewriter daisy wheel. Antennae: brake cables, drawer knobs.

martinet-2Butterfly, detail.

martinet-3
Butterfly, detail.

martinet-4Rhinoceros beetle. 13″ x 11″ x 6″ H. Legs: bike brake parts, bike derailleur chain, bike chain ring. Head and horn: small bike brake, pieces of a typewriter daisy wheel. Antennae: small bike parts. Thorax: shoe tree, bike Luxor headlight. Abdomen: motorbike light, shell-shaped drawer handles.

martinet-5
Rhinoceros beetle, detail.

martinet-6
Three-spined stickleback. 34″ x 5″ x 13″ H. Body: moped fenders and chain guards. Bones: tablespoons. Gills: car door parts. Fins: cake tins, fish slices, compasses. Tail: motorbike silencer, fish slices. Eyes: flashlights. Head: Solex front fenders.

martinet-7Moth. 31″ x 16″ x 7″ H. Wings: moped chain guards (rusted and patinated). Abdomen: motorbike headlights. Thorax: very old car headlamp. Legs: large upholstery tacks, car boot hinges, pieces of windshield wipers, bike brake parts, chain guards. Head: old rear position lamps, bike parts, pieces of a daisy wheel. Butterfly trunk: clock springs. Antennae: aluminium heating resistor.

martinet-8Moth, detail.

martinet-9
Wasp. 11″ x 6″ x 16″ H. Abdomen: steel tips for boots, bike headlights. Thorax and head: steel tips and bells from bikes and typewriters. Eyes: vintage watch case. Antennae: spectacles arms. Legs: bike brakes, bike chain, spoon handles. Wings: glass.

martinet-10
Red ant. 25″ x 16″ x 9″ H. Thorax and head: sauce spoons, car parts. Eyes: marbles. Abdomen: bike or motorbike headlights. Antennae: small bike chains. Legs: cream chargers, brake parts, chains, alarm clock feet, spoon handles.

martinet-11
Dragonfly. 37″ x 49″ x 15″ H. Abdomen: patinated copper/brass bicycle pump, car horn part, parts of old acetylene bike lights (at the ends). Thorax: two motorbike rear lights, shell-shaped drawer handles, big upholstery tacks. Head: car or lorry old stop lights, parts of acetylene bike lights, parts of a daisy wheel for typewriter (hair from the mouth). Legs: tubes, bike cable guide, wing nuts, wire. Wings: umbrella ribs, wire, wire netting for hen coops.

martinet-12
Dragonfly, detail.

When looking at these perfectly assembled sculptures by French artist Edouard Martinet (previously) it’s difficult to believe the raw materials he used ever existed in another form. Yet every head, thorax, leg, wing, and eye from these assorted creatures was once part of a car, bicycle, typewriter, or other found object. Reading through his material lists it becomes clear how completely thorough and judicious Martinet is in selecting the perfect objects to realize his vision, truly a master of his craft. Via Sladmore Contemporary:

His degree of virtuosity is unique: he does not solder or weld parts. His sculptures are screwed together. This gives his forms an extra level of visual richness – but not in a way that merely conveys the dry precision of, say, a watchmaker. There is an X-Factor here, a graceful wit, a re-imagining of the obvious in which a beautifully finished object glows not with perfection, but with character, with new life. Martinet takes about a month to make a sculpture and will often work on two or three pieces at the same time. It took him just four weeks to make his first sculpture and 17 years for his most recent completion!

If you want to see these new pieces up close, Martinet opens a new exhibition at Sladmore Contemporary in London, November 27 through January 31, 2014. You can see several additional new works on his website.

See related posts on Colossal about , , , .

Cats Waiting for Fishermen to Return

10067843263300c120

Love this photo of what appears to be cats waiting for fishermen to return to port. The photographer is unknown but it appears to have first been posted here about two years ago. (via Classic Pics, Stellar)

See related posts on Colossal about , , .

A Deadly Alkaline Lake in Africa Turns Animals into Calcified Statues

nick-1
Calcified Fish Eagle, Lake Natron, 2012

nick-2
Calcified Bat II, Lake Natron, 2012

nick-3
Calcified Swallow, Lake Natron, 2012

nick-4
Calcified Dove, Lake Natron, 2012

nick-5
Calcified Flamingo, Lake Natron, 2012

nick-6
Calcified Songbird, Lake Natron, 2012

Lake Natron in northern Tanzania is one of the harshest environments on Earth. Temperatures in the lake can rise to 140 °F (60 °C) and the alkalinity is between pH 9 and pH 10.5, almost as alkaline as ammonia. Animals who enter the water are almost certainly doomed, save certain kinds of fish that have evolved to survive in such a caustic environment.

While working Africa photographer Nick Brandt stopped by the lake to discover several dead animals on the shoreline. Birds and other small mammals that end up in the water gradually become calcified, turned to stone in the deadly water. Brandt tells NewScientist, “I could not help but photograph them. No one knows for certain exactly how they die, but it appears that the extreme reflective nature of the lake’s surface confuses them, and like birds crashing into plate glass windows, they crash into the lake.”

book

These photos and many more are included in Brandt’s new book, Across the Ravaged Land, a third and final volume of photography documenting the disappearance of animals in Eastern Africa. All photos copyright Nick Brandt, courtesy of Hasted Kraeutler Gallery. (via My Modern Met)

See related posts on Colossal about , , .

Wild Animals Stalk the Streets of a Small Town in Finland at Night

night-1

night-2

night-3

night-4

night-5

One night while walking the streets of Porvoo, Finland with a camera in hand, photographer Mikko Lagerstedt (previously) captured the silhouette of a large cat off in the distance lit feintly from behind by a street lamp. Struck by the image, he conceived of a new series called Night Animals, where all kinds of wildlife would prowl the streets of this small Finnish town at night. As much as I want to tell you he raided the local zoo to liberate an ostrich, the images are all composites of two photos, an animal and backdrop, both shot by Lagerstedt. If you liked this also check out Shauna Richardson’s Crochetdermy.

See related posts on Colossal about , , , .

Page 7 of 21«...6789...»