Tag Archives: animation

The New American: An Abstract Stop Motion Animation Laser Cut onto 800 Blocks of Wood by Nando Costa

The New American: An Abstract Stop Motion Animation Laser Cut onto 800 Blocks of Wood by Nando Costa wood stop motion animation

The New American: An Abstract Stop Motion Animation Laser Cut onto 800 Blocks of Wood by Nando Costa wood stop motion animation

Created by designer Nando Costa (previously) The New American is a painstakingly crafted motion graphics animation that was laser cut into a series of 800 individual maple blocks, a process that took nearly two years. Of the work Costa says:

The abstract storyline showcased in this piece is a concoction of a variety of ideas and can perhaps be described as a union between concepts and experiments born during the Situationist movement and real life events experienced during the last few years in American society. Particularly the duality between the economic downturn and the shift in values and beliefs of many citizens.

Several frames from the animation are currently available over on Etsy. (via Vimeo Staff Picks)

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The Deep: Animator ‘PES’ Creates a Murky Underwater World with Metallic Tools

The Deep: Animator PES Creates a Murky Underwater World with Metallic Tools stop motion ocean animation

American director and stop-motion animator PES just released his beautiful 2010 stop motion short The Deep on his official YouTube channel in high definition. The murky underwater world of fish, seaweed and other aquatic lifeforms is created entirely from old hand tools, nut crackers, calipers, film lenses, faucet knobs, chains, and skeleton keys—the exact opposite of what you might expect to animate sea life with—demonstrating why PES is clearly a master of his craft. The clip appeared briefly as part of Showtime Network’s “Short Stories” back in 2010 but later taken down. The re-release is accompanied by a limited edition screen print.

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155 Years Before the First Animated Gif, Joseph Plateau Set Images in Motion with the Phenakistoscope

155 Years Before the First Animated Gif, Joseph Plateau Set Images in Motion with the Phenakistoscope history gifs animation

155 Years Before the First Animated Gif, Joseph Plateau Set Images in Motion with the Phenakistoscope history gifs animation

Nearly 155 years before CompuServe debuted the first animated gif in 1987, Belgian physicist Joseph Plateau unveiled an invention called the Phenakistoscope, a device that is largely considered to be the first mechanism for true animation. The simple gadget relied on the persistence of vision principle to display the illusion of images in motion. Via Juxtapoz:

The phenakistoscope used a spinning disc attached vertically to a handle. Arrayed around the disc’s center were a series of drawings showing phases of the animation, and cut through it were a series of equally spaced radial slits. The user would spin the disc and look through the moving slits at the disc’s reflection in a mirror. The scanning of the slits across the reflected images kept them from simply blurring together, so that the user would see a rapid succession of images that appeared to be a single moving picture.

Though Plateau is credited with inventing the device, there were numerous other mathematicians and physicists who were working on similar ideas around the same time, and even they were building on the works of Greek mathematician Euclid and Sir Isaac Newton who had also identified principles behind the phenakistoscope.

155 Years Before the First Animated Gif, Joseph Plateau Set Images in Motion with the Phenakistoscope history gifs animation

155 Years Before the First Animated Gif, Joseph Plateau Set Images in Motion with the Phenakistoscope history gifs animation
Courtesy the Richard Balzer Collection

155 Years Before the First Animated Gif, Joseph Plateau Set Images in Motion with the Phenakistoscope history gifs animation
Courtesy the Richard Balzer Collection

155 Years Before the First Animated Gif, Joseph Plateau Set Images in Motion with the Phenakistoscope history gifs animation

155 Years Before the First Animated Gif, Joseph Plateau Set Images in Motion with the Phenakistoscope history gifs animation

155 Years Before the First Animated Gif, Joseph Plateau Set Images in Motion with the Phenakistoscope history gifs animation

155 Years Before the First Animated Gif, Joseph Plateau Set Images in Motion with the Phenakistoscope history gifs animation
The moving image was only viewable through a narrow slit. Via Wikimedia Commons

So what kinds of things did people want to see animated as they peered into these curious motion devices? Lions eating people. Women morphing into witches. And some other pretty wild and psychedelic imagery, not unlike animated gifs today. Included here is a random selection of some of the first animated images, several of which are courtesy The Richard Balzer Collection who has been painstakingly digitizing old phenakistoscopes over on their Tumblr. (via Juxtapoz, 2headedsnake, thanks Brian!)

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Down Into Nothing: A New Hand-Drawn Animation with Ink, Gouache, White-out and Coffee by Jake Fried

Down Into Nothing: A New Hand Drawn Animation with Ink, Gouache, White out and Coffee by Jake Fried animation

Down Into Nothing: A New Hand Drawn Animation with Ink, Gouache, White out and Coffee by Jake Fried animation

Down Into Nothing: A New Hand Drawn Animation with Ink, Gouache, White out and Coffee by Jake Fried animation

Animator Jake Fried (previously here and here) is back with another one of his super trippy layered animations titled Down Into Nothing. Fried paints and draws with endless layers of white-out, coffee, ink, and gouache which he photographs frame by frame to create each of his videos.

Watching Fried’s earlier work it’s amazing to see how far this technique has progressed both in style and in the sheer amount of detail he manages to cram into every frame. Jakes tells me that the surface becomes gradually uneven as he works and some of the unseen bumps and grooves from earlier compositions help guide what comes next. When he finishes the canvas is nearly an inch thick. See many more of his animations over on his website.

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New Animated Cake Zoetrope from Alexandre Dubosc

New Animated Cake Zoetrope from Alexandre Dubosc zoetropes stop motion food cake animation

New Animated Cake Zoetrope from Alexandre Dubosc zoetropes stop motion food cake animation

Artist Alexandre Dubosc (previously), known for his whirling cake zoetropes, just release this new piece he calls the Phytopage. While not as creepy as his earlier Tim Burton-inspired cake, any kind of animated cake is fine with me.

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Magic Beard: A Stop-Motion Video of Amazing Beard Tricks by Ben Garvin

Magic Beard: A Stop Motion Video of Amazing Beard Tricks by Ben Garvin stop motion beards animation

Magic Beard: A Stop Motion Video of Amazing Beard Tricks by Ben Garvin stop motion beards animation

Minneapolis-based photographer Ben Garvin just released this wacky video of stop-motion beard tricks called Magic Beard. Garvin shot the entire video on an iPhone and used an app called Stop Motion Studio to stitch it all together. Colossal takes no responsibility for how ridiculous this is. If you liked this also check out Trim. (via Laughing Squid)

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Brock Davis Turns His Clever Visual Jokes into Stop Motion Shorts on Vine

Brock Davis Turns His Clever Visual Jokes into Stop Motion Shorts on Vine Vine stop motion animation

I was excited to discover that mixed media artist Brock Davis (previously) recently joined Vine and started making some fantastic little animated shorts in his clever minimalist style. Definitely worth a follow.

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