Tag Archives: architecture

Time Slice: Iconic Buildings and Monuments Photographed Over Time by Richard Silver

Time Slice: Iconic Buildings and Monuments Photographed Over Time by Richard Silver time architecture
Colosseum, Rome, Italy

Time Slice: Iconic Buildings and Monuments Photographed Over Time by Richard Silver time architecture
London, England

Time Slice: Iconic Buildings and Monuments Photographed Over Time by Richard Silver time architecture
Suleymaniye Mosque, Istanbul, Turkey

Time Slice: Iconic Buildings and Monuments Photographed Over Time by Richard Silver time architecture
Hagia Sophia, Istanbul, Turkey

Time Slice: Iconic Buildings and Monuments Photographed Over Time by Richard Silver time architecture
Tongariki Easter Island Sunset

Time Slice: Iconic Buildings and Monuments Photographed Over Time by Richard Silver time architecture
Birds Nest, Beijing, China

Time Slice is an ongoing series of photographs by Richard Silver that explores how iconic buildings and monuments change in appearance from day into night. Silver shoots some 36 photos at intervals over several hours and then layers them into a final composition. We’ve seen a similar approach by Fong Qi Wei (and in motion), but the focus on a single structure tells an interesting story about each place, and conveys more than just a single shot. You can see more from the series here. All images courtesy the artist. (via Vacilando)

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Sprawling Cardboard Architecture by Nina Lindgren

Sprawling Cardboard Architecture by Nina Lindgren sculpture cardboard architecture

Sprawling Cardboard Architecture by Nina Lindgren sculpture cardboard architecture

Sprawling Cardboard Architecture by Nina Lindgren sculpture cardboard architecture

Sprawling Cardboard Architecture by Nina Lindgren sculpture cardboard architecture

Sprawling Cardboard Architecture by Nina Lindgren sculpture cardboard architecture

Sprawling Cardboard Architecture by Nina Lindgren sculpture cardboard architecture

Stockholm-based illustrator, printmaker, and artist Nina Lindgren was been working with cardboard to build a series of stacked geometric cityscapes that look like small architectural islands. The works are assembled like puzzles from carefully cut cardboard panels with internal lights for some of the houses. Her most recent piece, “Floating City” was recently on view at ArtRebels Gallery. You can see more over on her website. (via Hi-Fructose)

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A Trio of Dreamy Treehouses Linked by Bridges

A Trio of Dreamy Treehouses Linked by Bridges treehouses Atlanta architecture
All photos © Lindsay Appel for My Cool Shed

A Trio of Dreamy Treehouses Linked by Bridges treehouses Atlanta architecture

A Trio of Dreamy Treehouses Linked by Bridges treehouses Atlanta architecture

A Trio of Dreamy Treehouses Linked by Bridges treehouses Atlanta architecture

A Trio of Dreamy Treehouses Linked by Bridges treehouses Atlanta architecture

A Trio of Dreamy Treehouses Linked by Bridges treehouses Atlanta architecture

A Trio of Dreamy Treehouses Linked by Bridges treehouses Atlanta architecture

A Trio of Dreamy Treehouses Linked by Bridges treehouses Atlanta architecture

A Trio of Dreamy Treehouses Linked by Bridges treehouses Atlanta architecture

Architect and environmentalist Peter Bahouth designed and built this beautiful trio of treehouses linked by bridges in an Atlanta forest, which also happens to be his backyard. Inspired by the treehouses and adventures of his youth, the idea was to create a sort of fort for grown-ups. The three houses dubbed “Mind,” “Body,” and “Spirit,” include a living room and bedroom with a special bed that slides out for an improved view of the forest below. The photos here were taken for Jane Field-Lewis’ book My Cool Shed, provided courtesy photographer Lindsay Appel. (via iGNANT, CJ Who)

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Wait for the Bus inside a Giant Typographic Sculpture in Baltimore

Wait for the Bus inside a Giant Typographic Sculpture in Baltimore typography public transportation furniture Baltimore architecture

Wait for the Bus inside a Giant Typographic Sculpture in Baltimore typography public transportation furniture Baltimore architecture

Wait for the Bus inside a Giant Typographic Sculpture in Baltimore typography public transportation furniture Baltimore architecture

Wait for the Bus inside a Giant Typographic Sculpture in Baltimore typography public transportation furniture Baltimore architecture

Wait for the Bus inside a Giant Typographic Sculpture in Baltimore typography public transportation furniture Baltimore architecture

Wait for the Bus inside a Giant Typographic Sculpture in Baltimore typography public transportation furniture Baltimore architecture

Residents of a neighborhood in Baltimore now have the most obvious place to wait for a bus ever designed. The ingenious stop is comprised of three 14′ typographic sculptures that literally spell out the word “BUS” while functioning as benches and a novel leisure space. The bus stop was unveiled last month by artist collective mmmm…, a creative collaboration between Emilio Alarcón, Alberto Alarcón, Ciro Márquez, and Eva Salmerón, who have been designing public spaces in Madrid since 1998. This is their second project in the United States. Via the collective’s website:

BUS is made with wood and steel, materials that are typically used to build urban furniture. The three letters of BUS are big enough to accommodate two to four people each and protect them from rain, sun, wind, and inclement weather. They allow people to assume different postures of sitting or standing while waiting for the bus. The S allows people to lie back while they wait, and the B provides shelter.

The BUS project was developed in conjunction with SPAIN arts & culture, Creative Alliance, and is part of TRANSIT, a creative placemaking initiative between Europe and Baltimore. You can see much more, here. (via Escape Kit)

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A Brain-Like Building Turned into a Twisting Video Mapping Light Show

A Brain Like Building Turned into a Twisting Video Mapping Light Show video art projection installation architecture

A Brain Like Building Turned into a Twisting Video Mapping Light Show video art projection installation architecture

A Brain Like Building Turned into a Twisting Video Mapping Light Show video art projection installation architecture

A Brain Like Building Turned into a Twisting Video Mapping Light Show video art projection installation architecture

A Brain Like Building Turned into a Twisting Video Mapping Light Show video art projection installation architecture
Nikola Lenivets

A Brain Like Building Turned into a Twisting Video Mapping Light Show video art projection installation architecture
Nikola Lenivets

As part of the New Media Night Festival last month at Moscow’s Nikola-Lenivets Art Park, one of the most unusual video-mapping projects we’ve seen took place against the backdrop of Nikolay Polissky’s (previously) brain-like Universe Mind structure. The twisting, serpentine building has been used for years as a centerpiece to many events at the art park which now boasts a collection of almost 30 architecturally-influenced artworks, including a 170-foot trampoline installed in the middle of a forest.

For this year’s New Media Night Festival, media design studio Radugadesign was comissioned to set ‘Universe Mind’ in motion with this 8-minute video projection. If you’d like to get a feel for what it’s like to step inside the building under normal circumstances, check out this interactive 360° panorama. (via The Creator’s Project)

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Woven Sky: A Bamboo Tunnel Installation Woven Together Like a Basket by Wang Wen-Chih

Woven Sky: A Bamboo Tunnel Installation Woven Together Like a Basket by Wang Wen Chih bamboo Australia architecture

all images courtesy Cave Urban

Woven Sky: A Bamboo Tunnel Installation Woven Together Like a Basket by Wang Wen Chih bamboo Australia architecture

Woven Sky: A Bamboo Tunnel Installation Woven Together Like a Basket by Wang Wen Chih bamboo Australia architecture

Woven Sky: A Bamboo Tunnel Installation Woven Together Like a Basket by Wang Wen Chih bamboo Australia architecture

Woven Sky: A Bamboo Tunnel Installation Woven Together Like a Basket by Wang Wen Chih bamboo Australia architecture

Woven Sky: A Bamboo Tunnel Installation Woven Together Like a Basket by Wang Wen Chih bamboo Australia architecture

Woven Sky: A Bamboo Tunnel Installation Woven Together Like a Basket by Wang Wen Chih bamboo Australia architecture

Woven Sky: A Bamboo Tunnel Installation Woven Together Like a Basket by Wang Wen Chih bamboo Australia architecture

Using 600 poles of bamboo and 70 radiata pine logs all harvested locally, Taiwanese Artist Wang Wen-Chih created a massive installation that served as the entrance to the Woodford Folk Festival in Australia. Working with the Sydney-based architecture and design collective Cave Urban, a team of 40 workers and volunteers spent 3 weeks building the structure. Each bamboo pole was split into 4-5 pieces and weaved together like a basket. Woven Sky, which rises 15m high and is 100m long, was completed late last year, just in time for the music festival, and served an impressive entrance point into the amphitheater stage.

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Wink Space: An Immersive Kaleidoscopic Mirror Tunnel Inside a Shipping Container

Wink Space: An Immersive Kaleidoscopic Mirror Tunnel Inside a Shipping Container zippers mirrors installation architecture

Wink Space: An Immersive Kaleidoscopic Mirror Tunnel Inside a Shipping Container zippers mirrors installation architecture

Wink Space: An Immersive Kaleidoscopic Mirror Tunnel Inside a Shipping Container zippers mirrors installation architecture

Wink Space: An Immersive Kaleidoscopic Mirror Tunnel Inside a Shipping Container zippers mirrors installation architecture

Wink Space: An Immersive Kaleidoscopic Mirror Tunnel Inside a Shipping Container zippers mirrors installation architecture

Wink Space: An Immersive Kaleidoscopic Mirror Tunnel Inside a Shipping Container zippers mirrors installation architecture

For the 2013 KOBE Biennale artists and designers were invited to create environments inside industrial shipping containers as part of the ‘Art in a Container International Competition.’ Designers Masakazu Shirane and Saya Miyazaki created Wink Space, a modular installation made from mirrors that formed a giant kaleidoscopic tunnel. Not only was the piece an fun immersive environment, but it was also an experiment in building with zippers. “We wanted to create the world’s first zipper architecture. In other words, this polyhedron is completely connected by zippers. And in order to facilitate even more radical change some of the surfaces open and close like windows,” says Shirane.

Wink Space was a winner of the A’Design Award, and you can see more behind the scenes photos here. (via Spoon & Tamago)

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