architecture

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Art Design

Soaring Wire Mesh Buildings Cast Ethereal Shadows Over Coachella Music Festival

April 26, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

All images © Roberto Conte

Italian artist Edoardo Tresoldi (previously), known for his massive architectural sculptures made of wire, built three transparent structures for this year’s Coachella music festival in California. Titled ‘Etherea’, the sculptural series was comprised of three identical buildings in different sizes, inspired by Neoclassical and Baroque aesthetics. The buildings were illuminated at night with a hazy lavender glow that emphasized the illusion of Etherea’s solidity. You can hear Tresoldi share more about his work in a TED talk, and see previous installations on his website, Instagram, and Facebook. (via Ignant)

 

 



Photography

A Rare Glimpse at a Deserted Great Wall of China Captured by Andres Gallardo Albajar

April 19, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

This past February architectural photographer Andres Gallardo Albajar traveled to the Great Wall of China where he was able to take in a rare sight—one of the seven wonders of the world without a single soul to be seen. Albajar had expected to create the same tourist-filled images as others who visited the architectural feat, however when he arrived he found a thick fog encapsulating the structure. The dense cover may have been a deterrent for tourists, but this particular weather added further mystery to the deserted landscape Albajar captured in this recent series.

“I was expecting big amounts of people, even lines to access or things like that, but for my surprise there was very few people, which allowed me to capture the wall with no people, which in my opinion helps to create a more surreal and magic feeling,” Albajar tells Colossal.

You can view more of the Spanish photographer’s work, including his multi-part series on urban geometry, on his website, Instagram, and Behance.

 

 



Design

Artificial Island is the First of Nine Proposed Floating Cultural Destinations in Copenhagen Harbor

April 2, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

A tiny, man-made island floats near the center of Copenhagen Harbor. Rooted inside of the wooden platform is a single linden tree, which gives the 215-square-foot pentagon the appearance of a park rather than a stray dock. Australian architect Marshall Blecher teamed up with Magnus Maarbjerg from Danish design studio Fokstrot to build the public gathering place as a prototype for their project Copenhagen Islands.

The project aims to build a series of similar platforms throughout Copenhagen Harbor with a variety of public purposes. Despite its diminutive size, the current island has already hosted a few small events including a lecture series regarding the future of harbor cities like Copenhagen.

The team has proposed nine islands, each of which can connect to form a larger island, or what the architect’s refer to as a “parkipelago.” Currently there are plans for a stage, coffee shop, sauna, diving board, and mussel farm which will all be accessible via boat. With an increase in large-scale apartment buildings filling the area, Maarbjerg and Blecher hope their plan will bring more cultural opportunities to the expanding coast.

“It was developed to ​introduce life and activity to Copenhagen’s rapidly developing harbour and to ​bring back some of the whimsy that has been lost in ​its development,” said Blecher in Dezeen.

This first stage of the project was funded by the Statenskunstfond and Havnekulturpuljen, a local organization that promotes the expansion of cultural and sporting events in the surrounding harbor. The two are working with Statenskunstfond and other not-for profits to help fund their next stage. The island is currently located in Slusen, in Copenhagen’s South Harbor, but will move north to the area of Refshaleøen later this spring. (via Dezeen)

 

 



Animation Design History

Ancient Ruins Reconstructed with Architectural GIFs

March 23, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

Parthenon, Greece

Today, views of the world’s ancient architectural wonders are firmly based in their current state of ruin, leaving to visitors’ imaginations the original glory of structures like the Parthenon, Pyramid of the Sun, and Temple of Luxor. NeoMam, in a project for Expedia, has resurrected several ancient buildings through a series of gifs. In a matter of seconds, centuries of natural and intentional damage and decay are reversed to reveal a rare glimpse at what the original structures would have looked like. The creative contractors behind the labor-intensive renderings are Maja Wrońska (previously) and her husband Przemek Sobiecki, who works as This Is Render.  (via designboom)

Pyramid of the Sun, Mexico

Temple of Largo Argentina, Rome

Nohoch Mul Pyramid (Coba), Mexico

Temple of Luxor, Egypt

Temple of Jupiter, Italy

Hadrian’s Wall, England

 

 



Design

A National Park-Inspired Chapel Composed of Branching Fractals by Yu Momeoda

February 23, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

Agri Chapel is located within a national park on the northwest coast of Japan’s island of Kyushu. The chapel was constructed by Japanese architect Yu Momoeda, who wanted to reflect the surrounding forest by bringing tree-like forms into the building.

To create the structure’s central dome, Momoeda stacked wooden pillars in the shape of simplistic tree branches. This nature-based support system imitates the branching fractals found in trees, with ascending symmetrical patterns spread throughout the light-filled space. (via Jeroen Apers)

 

 



Art

The Subverted Architecture and Twisted Objects of Alex Chinneck

February 8, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

Birth, death, and a midlife crisis

British sculptor Alex Chinneck (previously) upends the steady, reliable nature of banal structures that we interact with every day through his architectural interventions. Overturned swaths of car parking lots, twisted broomstick handles, and inverted building facades are executed with such precise detail that it is difficult to determine where reality ends and surreality begins. Chinneck describes one particular piece to It’s Nice That as “sculpturally bold but contextually sensitive,” which seems an apt description of his entire body of work. You can see more on his website and Instagram. (via It’s Nice That)

Take my lighting but don’t steal my thunder

Take my lighting but don’t steal my thunder

Under the weather but over the moon

Broom

Telling the truth though false teeth

Telling the truth through false teeth

Pick yourself up and pull yourself together

Pick yourself up and pull yourself together

A bullet from a shooting star

 

 



Design

Japanese-Designed Public Restrooms in the Shape of Fish, Crabs, Tree Stumps

February 6, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

Flickr user and photographer Okinawa Soba (Rob) has been documenting the obscure designs of public restroom facilities on the Japanese island of Okinawa for the last six years. Rob has lived on the island, which is home to 1.3 million residents, for nearly 43 years, and has had the chance to explore some of the stranger bathrooms the prefecture has to offer. Included in this group is a koi-shaped bathroom which asks guests to enter through the mouth, a sliced orange, a stubby trunk with windows that have replaced its missing branches, and a robotic crab. You can see more of Rob’s unique Japanese finds (including these Okinawa manhole covers) on his photostream. (via Web Urbanist)