architecture

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Design Photography

A Half Century of Bowling Alley Design in Southern Germany Captured by Robert Götzfried

October 10, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

German photographer Robert Götzfried (previously) seeks out unique architecture for series that focus on one particular element of a culture or place. Previous projects have documented the pipe organs of 20 German Catholic churches, observed the creative construction of Cambodia’s roadside barber shops, and captured abandoned storefronts that exist across Australia.

For the last few years Götzfried has focused on photographing the design of bowling alleys and “Kegelbahnen” across Southern Germany, most of which exist from the ’60s, ’70s, and ’80s. Kegeln is a German sport similar to bowling, however with smaller balls, only nine pins, and shortened lanes. The sport has fallen from popularity, and many of the photographed lanes’ quality has diminished with the times. You can see a larger selection of Götzfried’s photographic projects on his websiteInstagram, and Behance. (via This Isn’t Happiness)

 

 



Design

Twenty-One Colorful Cubes Compose Denmark’s Newly Opened Lego House

October 5, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

After four years of construction, Denmark’s colorful LEGO House has finally been unveiled to the public in the company’s native land of Billund. The building, designed by the Copenhagen and New York-based design firm Bjarke Ingels Group (BIG), is composed of 21 large, white cubes which each contain a colorfully painted roof. This “stack” is topped by an oversized LEGO brick, an oblong keystone which contains eight skylights that peer into the building below.

The structure is color-coded to correspond to four experience sections which encourage visitors to explore their creativity in different aspects of learning and play. The red section is for creative skills, blue utilizes cognitive abilities, green engages social interaction, and yellow contains activities aimed at emotion. In addition to these zones there are also three restaurants, a store, a 6,500 square foot public square, and two exhibition areas that display creations built by fans and works that explore the history of LEGO.

You can explore more images of the new interactive center on its website. (via Designboom)

 

 



Art Design Photography

Pass Seamlessly Through the Walls of an Abandoned Building in this Photographic 3D Reconstruction by Oddviz

October 5, 2017

Christopher Jobson

El Orfelinato is the latest experimental visualization from digital artist Erdal Inci (previously) as part of an artist collective he co-founded called Oddviz with Çağrı Taşkın and Serkan Kaptan. The video piece captures an abandoned Jewish orphanage building in Ortaköy, Istanbul, through thousands of photos and 3D scans and then reconstructs it digitally, allowing the viewer to pass digitally through the walls while seeing a complete photographic representation of the building. The piece is a follow-up to a similar work from a few months ago titled Hotel.

 

 



Design

An Historic Cape Town Grain Silo Converted into 80 Cylindrical Art Galleries

September 18, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

Housed in what was once Cape Town’s tallest building is the newly unveiled Zeitz Museum of Contemporary Art Africa (Zeitz MOCAA), created by London-based architect Thomas Heatherwick. The institution’s 80 gallery spaces were converted from 42 historic grain silos, storage units which were once used to hold and grade maize from all over South Africa.

Heatherwick Studio transformed the tightly packed tubes into open areas of contemplation, carving out various oblong shapes to make room for large social spaces and lots of light from overhead windows. Heatherwick wished to clear out large spaces for the galleries, however he was also careful about not eliminating the tubular structure of the building completely.

“We realised we needed to do something that your eye couldn’t instantly predict,” Heatherwick told Dezeen“Our role was destructing rather than constructing, but trying to destruct with a confidence and an energy, and not treating the building as a shrine.”

The nearly 20,000 square foot museum is one of many facilities that form the V&A Waterfront, a cultural center dotted with several bars and restaurants on the city’s harbor. (via Dezeen)

 

 



Art Design

A Towering 4-Story Organic Structure Built From Material as Thin as a Coin

September 12, 2017

Christopher Jobson

All photographs © NAARO

Minima | Maxima is the latest creation from Marc Fornes / THEVERYMANY, known for their innovative fusion of computational design and architecture to build organic self-supporting structures. This new piece was commissioned by World Expo 2017 and now stands as a permanent structure on the grounds in Astana, Kazakhstan. Despite its impressive height of 43′ feet (13.1 meters), the core material used to build Minima | Maxima are 2mm strips of aluminum. From their project statement:

Minima | Maxima evolves the studio’s invention of ‘Structural Stripes’ — a signature material system for building self-supporting curvilinear structures — with a step in a direction that offers even more structural potential: multi-ply composite. Three layers of flat stripes — white and white sandwiching pink — are constructed in tandem, supporting one another as they assume curvature and gain height. One layer never exists independently, but contributes to and benefits from the unified whole as it is built.

The system warrants comparison to fiber technology — such as carbon or glass fiber — yet is unique in that unlike fibers, each individual component does not need to be in tension (a straight line), and/or their processing does not require any mold or temporary scaffolding. Also such a composite system is mechanically bonded, allowing for recomposition and corrections during construction.

You can see how the structure was assembled in the video below, and explore more work by THEVERYMANY on Instagram.

 

 



Art Design

New Miniature Mobile Homes Created From Balsa Wood by Vera van Wolferen

August 24, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

Dutch artist Vera van Wolferen (previously here and here) imagines new designs for homes on-the-go, producing miniature balsa wood models of tiny houses that teeter on the top of sedans or contain wheels to propel themselves on the road. The sculptures, which she refers to as Story Objects, are intended to allude to narratives, and are often built with the addition of cotton to serve as clouds or tiny puffs of chimney smoke. The rest of the miniature house is left as minimal as possible, van Wolferen focusing on the architecture of the object rather than a complicated color scheme.

You can see a 360 degree video for a piece she’s titled Jeep Safari for the Cultural Anthropologist in the video below, and view more of her miniature homes on her InstagramFacebook and Behance.

 

 



Design

A Secret Work Studio Suspended Below a Highway Overpass by Fernando Abellanas

August 21, 2017

Laura Staugaitis

All images by Jose Manuel Pedrajas, courtesy Lebrel

Spanish furniture designer Fernando Abellanas has carved out a new creative home in a section of Valencia that isn’t the typical artist neighborhood: he’s built a studio affixed to a highway underpass. The workspace is complete with a desk and chair, as well as shelves stocked with homey framed artworks and potted succulents―all attached to the highway’s cement framework. The floor and walls function as a self-operated horizontal elevator. Using mechanics adapted from a metal dolly, Abellanas hand-cranks his way to his studio, completing the picture of a cozy four-walled workspace.

As he described in an interview with le cool Valencia, Abellanas has a lifelong interest in refuges―locating peace and solitude in unexpected places, like under the dinner table as as a child, and now, hidden underneath the whir of traffic. The designer is also inspired by the way people with very limited resources use neglected spaces to create homes.

The studio hasn’t been sanctioned by the city of Valencia, so its exact location is a secret, and it will remain intact for as long as Abellanas is able to keep it there. You can follow more of Abellanas’ work  for his brand Lebrel via Instagram and Facebook, and the video below (in Spanish) offers a closer look. (via FastCo)

 

 

A Colossal

Highlight

Brick Man