Tag Archives: architecture

Artist Charles Young Is Building a Vast Paper City, One Tiny Model at a Time

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One of my favorite new Tumblrs to follow is Paperholm, a project that started this summer by Charles Young who challenged himself to build a new paper structure each day. Young received his bachelor and masters degrees from the Edinburgh College of Art where he taught himself paper and card modelling. Despite a long-time familiarity with the process and materials, it’s amazing to see the progress he’s made in just the last three months or so as the models become more intricate and lend themselves to bits of animation. You can follow Young’s growing paper city here. (via My Modern Met)

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Architectural Landmarks Created with Bicycle Tire Tracks by Thomas Yang

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Earlier this year we mentioned Thomas Yang over at 100copies used the prints from bicycle tire treads to create a poster of the Empire State Building. Yang has since explored three additional landmarks around the world that merge his passion for cycling and architecture including depictions of the Eiffel Tower, the Tower Bridge, and China’s Forbidden City. While it appears the individual prints are sold out, they are still available as a full set. (via Arch Atlas)

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Artist Kat O’Sullivan Transforms a Dull Shack Into a Psychedelic Rainbow House

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The artist Kat O’ Sullivan has been creating upcycled sweaters and clothing for over 20 years. “It seems like anything within my grasp ends up painted a million colors,” she says. And this statement certainly held true when the artist decided to purchase a home in upstate New York that had been built in 1840. “I just thought it was cute,” explains Sullivan, but “it was the kind of house you would drive by and never notice.”

But once in the hands of the artist and her “creative mayhem” the home quickly began to change. After a trip to the local paint shop – “give me one of everything!” – Sullivan spent countless hours painting and renovating until the home looked like a psychedelic rainbow complete with oddly shaped windows, eyes and a big mouth. But “Calico,” as Sullivan calls her home, is an eternal work in progress. “It will only get weirder.”

You can keep up with Sullivan and her psychedelic home on Facebook or on Etsy, where she sells sweaters and tutorials on how to make her sweaters. (via Designboom)

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An Illustrated Cross Section of Hong Kong’s Infamous Kowloon Walled City

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View a full-resolution version of the map.

The Kowloon Walled City in Hong Kong was built gradually—building on top of building—over time. Without a single architect, the ungoverned and most densely populated district became a haven for drugs, crime and prostitution until it was demolished in 1993. Photo documentation of the site exists but for the most part much of the inner-workings of the city remained a mystery.

Perhaps due to its proximity, Japan, in particular, developed a keen interest towards Kowloon. Its demolition in 1993 was broadcast on national television. But watching the footage, what most spectators didn’t realize was that up until the night before demolition a team of Japanese researchers were taking precise measurements and documenting the vacated city. Their findings were compiled into a book that, among other things, featured this panoramic cross section of the city depicting what life was like inside. You can read more about the book on Spoon & Tamago, and if you look hard enough, a few rare copies of it are available online. (via deconcrete)

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Lost Castle: The Crumbling Ruins of the Castle of Mesen

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Located in a park near the center of Lede, Belgium, the Castle of Mesen dates back to the 17th century where it served as a home for various lords before a conversion to an industrial site. Throughout the 1800s the complex was used as a gin distillery, a tobacco factory, and a sugar refinery. In 1897 the castle was then sold to a religious order who constructed an impressive neo-gothic chapel and turned the entire facility into a boarding school.

Although it was still in use up until the 1960s, a tragic storm of abandonment, looting, and a failed attempt to designate the castle as a monument lead to a decision to demolish of the entire castle just a few years ago. Lucky for us, photographer Jan Stel of Past Glory managed to sneak inside and capture a few amazing shots before it disappears forever. The juxtaposition of the stained glass windows and decaying roof and sprawling foliage is especially striking. See more from this series here. (via Arch Atlas)

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New Wooden Cityscapes Sculpted with a Bandsaw by James McNabb

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Furniture-maker-turned-sculptor James McNabb (previously) just opened a new exhibition of work titled Metros at Robert Fontaine Gallery in Miami. McNabb continues his exploration of architectural shapes using an improvised form of woodworking frequently described as “sketching with a bandsaw.” Without regard to the design or stability a true architect might utilize, he instead works with more abstract shapes cut from repurposed and exotic woods which in turn become component pieces for larger sculptures resembling wheels or tables. McNabb shares via email:

I compare hyperrealistic painting to fine woodworking. Both are slow, tedious, detail oriented process that require great care and consideration through every stage of making. In contrast, I compare my style of rapid bandsaw mark making to the fast paced nature of spray can art. It’s my attempt at “urban woodworking”.

Metros will be on view through October 28, 2014 and you can see more of McNabb’s recent work right here.

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Timelapse of the Amish raising a giant barn in under 10 hours

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Ohio resident Scott Miller shot this timelapse video earlier this year of dozens of Amish men raising a barn. The entire construction cycle takes place between 7am and 5pm—with at least an hour for lunch—and yet the bulk of the work is done by the end of the day. Amazing to see how incredibly precise the entire endeavor is. (via Sploid)

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