Tag Archives: architecture

The Tessellated and Elaborately Detailed Ceilings of Iranian Mosques 

Celling of Hazrate-masomeh's mosque in Qom, Iran

Celling of Hazrate-Masomeh’s mosque in Qom, Iran, all images courtesy of Mehrdad Rasoulifard (@m1rasoulifard)

Capturing the intricately tiled ceilings of centuries old mosques, Instagram photographer Mehrdad Rasoulifard (@m1rasoulifard) gives his followers both a history lesson and aesthetic treat. The ceilings are not only covered in rich patterns, but architecturally structured to appear like complex tessellations or honeycombs. The mosques are built to include spiraling series of domes and indents, causing the viewer to get lost in their disorienting beauty.

Often Iranian architecture utilizes symbolic geometry, incorporating an abundant use of circles and squares obvious in the photographed buildings’ symmetrical layouts. Popular colors incorporated into these tiled structures include gold, white, and turquoise which are typically layered onto dark blue backgrounds.

The oldest structure photographed is over 900-years-old which hints at the vast architectural history found in Iran. You can see more of the country’s detailed places of worship and observation on Rasoulifard’s Instagram. (via Designboom)

Celling of Hazrate-masomeh's mosque in Qom, Iran

Celling of Hazrate-Masomeh’s mosque in Qom, Iran

Celling of Hazrate-masomeh's mosque in Qom, Iran

Celling of Hazrate-Masomeh’s mosque in Qom, Iran

Celling of Sheikh-lotfollah's mosque in Esfahan, Iran

Celling of Sheikh-Lotfollah’s mosque in Esfahan, Iran

Sheikh lotfollah mosque in Esfahan,Iran, about 400 years old

Sheikh Lotfollah mosque in Esfahan,Iran, about 400 years old

Sheikh lotfollah mosque in Esfahan, Iran, about 400 years old

Sheikh Lotfollah mosque in Esfahan, Iran, about 400 years old

Celling of Shahe-cheragh's mosque in Shiraz, Iran

Celling of Shahe-Cheragh’s mosque in Shiraz, Iran

Celling of Jameh's mosque in Esfahan, Iran, 900 years old

Celling of Jameh’s mosque in Esfahan, Iran, 900 years old

Celling of Hazrate-masomeh's mosque in Qom, Iran

Celling of Hazrate-Masomeh’s mosque in Qom, Iran

Celling of Nasir-Al-Molk's mosque in Shiraz,Iran

Celling of Nasir-Al-Molk’s mosque in Shiraz,Iran

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A 300-Foot Tunnel Excavated Through Walls Examines the Creative and Destructive Powers of Mankind 

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All images courtesy Daniel Arsham

In his latest exhibition, “The Future Was Then,”  Daniel Arsham (previously here and here) carved a path through the SCAD Museum of Art’s Pamela Elaine Poetter Gallery utilizing a series of faux concrete walls. The 300-foot-long series of walls starts with the cutout of an abstract shape roughly the size of a human body. As one looks at the progression of carvings and walls, the holes begin to form a representational shape, ending in the fully formed outline of a life-size human.

The “Wall Excavation” installation explores how mankind interacts with architecture, continuously building and destroying the walls around them. This central installation points to this idea directly, showing the path of destruction around a singular human form. By standing between the carved walls, visitors can literally place themselves in the the timeline of our intimate history with architecture, finding their own place amidst the excavated exhibition.

You can follow Arsham’s work on Twitter and Instagram, and learn more about his collaborative art and architecture project Snarkitecture here. “The Future Was Then” will be on display at SCAD through July 24, 2016. (via Designboom)

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Architectural Watercolors of a Dreamlike Warsaw by Tytus Brzozowski 

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Architect and watercolorist Tytus Brzozowski imagines a dreamlike world where giant structures rest on towering stilts and trains seem to emerge from tunnels in the side of residential buildings. Unusual motifs like dice and teapots dot the landscape (or float through the air), and yet everything seems in its place, a credibility attributed to elements lifted directly from the architecture seen on the streets of Warsaw, Poland. Brzozowski refers to his watercolor paintings as “the city of his dreams,” and just as dreams seem to defy space and time, his paintings bring together elements of the present and past. You can see more of his work on Facebook and many of his pieces are available as prints through Lumarte. (via Colossal Submissions)

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Portraits of Chinese Rockstars Imagined as Monumental Temples 

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Chinese artist DU Kun has long harbored a reverence for music and rockstars. A musician himself, the Beijing-based painter is awed by the creation of music, aspects of fame, and the intangible aura of being a revered rockstar, something he tries to capture is these temple-like portraits of famous Chinese recording artists titled “Revels of the Rock Gods”.

Each oil painting depicts the face of a musician as if it were a temple built in devotion to a god and borrows elements from Buddhist and Confucian architecture. Eyes are depicted as windows, tree branches or waterfalls as flowing hair, and the surface of skin as ornate wood facades gilded with gold.

Kun is currently exhibiting the “Revels of the Rock Gods” series as part of his first solo show in Japan at Mizuma Art Gallery in Tokyo through February 13, 2016. You can explore close-up details plus an archive of Kun’s work on his website. (via Hi-Fructose)

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New Inverted Architecture Paintings by Cinta Vidal 

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“Three cities and a house,” 2015

Barcelona-based Cinta Vidal (previously) produces complex architectural constructions to express how differently individuals can occupy the same world— each inhabitant carving out their own nook, cranny, and path within a similar environment. Her new acrylic on wood panels continue to serve as a metaphor for the difficulty of understanding those around us, especially while distracted by navigating our own complicated existence.

Vidal’s paintings set domestic and natural environments in their own gravity-defying orbit, making small planets out of Bauhaus homes, secluded camping spots, and cacti-filled parks. The characters included in each work seem unaffected by the others around them, many wistfully daydreaming or lost deep within a book.

This past December Vidal presented four works with Thinkspace Gallery at Scope Miami Beach and will also show a few with the same space at the LA Art Show from January 27-31. You can read more about Vidal’s process and architectural works on her blog here.

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“Bauhaus neighbors,” 30×30 cm, acrylic on wood panel

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“Together alone,” 2015

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“Excursion,” 2015

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Commissioned painting, 2015

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“Free camping,” 50×50 cm, acrylic on wood panel

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“Rock neighbors,” 2015

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A Picturesque Mountaintop Skywalk in the Czech Republic with a 330 Foot Slide Down 

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All images by Jakub Skokan, Martin Tůma / BoysPlayNice

Extended over a cliff nearly 3,600 feet above sea level rests the Dolni Morava Sky Walk, a looping structure that allows visitors the opportunity to peek their heads into the clouds. Extending like an old-fashioned roller coaster from the Králický Sněžník mountain in the Czech Republic, the architectural destination features panoramic views of the Morava river and Krkonoše Mountains.

Produced by Fránek Architects, the wood and steel walkway was designed to blend into the existing environment rather than upset the appearance of its natural surroundings. With a subtle slope and wide pathway, the structure also accommodates those in wheelchairs and strollers who want to explore the top.

Unlike glass-bottom feats of architecture like China’s Haohan Qiao bridge and Chicago’s Willis Tower, the Sky Walk features a far more terrifying mesh floor that allows brave visitors to lay at the peak of the structure. In addition to this daredevil net, the walkway also features a 330 foot slide within its core, a streamlined metal chute that’s nearly 18 stories tall. You can read more about the Sky Walk’s concept on Frànek Architects’ site here. (via Dezeen)

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