Tag Archives: architecture

Okuda San Miguel Wraps a Moroccan Church in a Vibrant Geometric Mural 


All images courtesy of Ink and Movement

After covering a church turned skatepark in Spain with his signature style of murals, Okuda San Miguel (previously) has now transformed an abandoned Moroccan church into a 360-degree mural titled “11 Mirages to Freedom.” The street artist covered the structure in geometric bears, birds, and human faces, produced as a part of the British Council‘s Street Art Caravane Initiative. Working with the architecture already in place, San Miguel painted each of the building’s eleven faces while incorporating the structure’s barred windows. These he formed into bird cages, hats, and masks that are seamlessly incorporated…as long as you don’t look into the barred openings.

The church is uniformly painted in a brilliant shade of yellow, with smaller architectural details painted in equally vibrant colors. You can see more of San Miguel’s murals in the video Infinite World included below, as well as on the artist’s Instagram. (via Web Urbanist)













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Macro Photographs of Nature’s Tiniest Architects by Nicky Bay 


Bagworm moth larva (Psychidae), all images courtesy of Nicky Bay


Bagworm moth larva (Psychidae)

Nicky Bay (previously here and here) is the master of capturing the exceptionally small, photographing insects typically passed over without acknowledgement or recognition. The Singapore-based photographer stays acutely aware of these tiny creatures, using macro photography to highlight each minuscule detail. While taking a closer look at the micro world found deep in the rainforest, Bay began to notice tiny structures built by his favorite subject. The bug buildings appear manmade—tiny log cabins, gates, tents, and fortresses blocking each insect from the world just beyond their carefully placed twigs and segments of silk.

My favorite microscopic discovery of Bay’s was the Bagworm moth larva’s twisting stack of twigs it builds to protect itself as it grows inside. These stacked structures are almost perfect in their symmetry, each side built with twigs that are equal in length and width. Another favorite is the Arctiinae moth pupa’s cage produced from caterpillar hair and silk, a semi-protective fortress that appears almost like chicken wire.

Ray has collected several other examples of these tiny architects, including a web tower and silk-covered tent which you can see over on his macro photography blog. You can also follow his day-to-day macro photography on Facebook.


Bagworm moth larva (Psychidae)


Web tower structure, image by Jeff Cremer



Arctiine moth pupa (Cyana sp.)



Arctiine moth pupa (Cyana sp.)


Arctiine moth pupa (Cyana sp.)


Arctiine moth pupa (Cyana sp.)


Bagworm Moth


Bagworm moth larva (Psychidae)

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The Tessellated and Elaborately Detailed Ceilings of Iranian Mosques 

Celling of Hazrate-masomeh's mosque in Qom, Iran

Celling of Hazrate-Masomeh’s mosque in Qom, Iran, all images courtesy of Mehrdad Rasoulifard (@m1rasoulifard)

Capturing the intricately tiled ceilings of centuries old mosques, Instagram photographer Mehrdad Rasoulifard (@m1rasoulifard) gives his followers both a history lesson and aesthetic treat. The ceilings are not only covered in rich patterns, but architecturally structured to appear like complex tessellations or honeycombs. The mosques are built to include spiraling series of domes and indents, causing the viewer to get lost in their disorienting beauty.

Often Iranian architecture utilizes symbolic geometry, incorporating an abundant use of circles and squares obvious in the photographed buildings’ symmetrical layouts. Popular colors incorporated into these tiled structures include gold, white, and turquoise which are typically layered onto dark blue backgrounds.

The oldest structure photographed is over 900-years-old which hints at the vast architectural history found in Iran. You can see more of the country’s detailed places of worship and observation on Rasoulifard’s Instagram. (via Designboom)

Celling of Hazrate-masomeh's mosque in Qom, Iran

Celling of Hazrate-Masomeh’s mosque in Qom, Iran

Celling of Hazrate-masomeh's mosque in Qom, Iran

Celling of Hazrate-Masomeh’s mosque in Qom, Iran

Celling of Sheikh-lotfollah's mosque in Esfahan, Iran

Celling of Sheikh-Lotfollah’s mosque in Esfahan, Iran

Sheikh lotfollah mosque in Esfahan,Iran, about 400 years old

Sheikh Lotfollah mosque in Esfahan,Iran, about 400 years old

Sheikh lotfollah mosque in Esfahan, Iran, about 400 years old

Sheikh Lotfollah mosque in Esfahan, Iran, about 400 years old

Celling of Shahe-cheragh's mosque in Shiraz, Iran

Celling of Shahe-Cheragh’s mosque in Shiraz, Iran

Celling of Jameh's mosque in Esfahan, Iran, 900 years old

Celling of Jameh’s mosque in Esfahan, Iran, 900 years old

Celling of Hazrate-masomeh's mosque in Qom, Iran

Celling of Hazrate-Masomeh’s mosque in Qom, Iran

Celling of Nasir-Al-Molk's mosque in Shiraz,Iran

Celling of Nasir-Al-Molk’s mosque in Shiraz,Iran

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A 300-Foot Tunnel Excavated Through Walls Examines the Creative and Destructive Powers of Mankind 


All images courtesy Daniel Arsham

In his latest exhibition, “The Future Was Then,”  Daniel Arsham (previously here and here) carved a path through the SCAD Museum of Art’s Pamela Elaine Poetter Gallery utilizing a series of faux concrete walls. The 300-foot-long series of walls starts with the cutout of an abstract shape roughly the size of a human body. As one looks at the progression of carvings and walls, the holes begin to form a representational shape, ending in the fully formed outline of a life-size human.

The “Wall Excavation” installation explores how mankind interacts with architecture, continuously building and destroying the walls around them. This central installation points to this idea directly, showing the path of destruction around a singular human form. By standing between the carved walls, visitors can literally place themselves in the the timeline of our intimate history with architecture, finding their own place amidst the excavated exhibition.

You can follow Arsham’s work on Twitter and Instagram, and learn more about his collaborative art and architecture project Snarkitecture here. “The Future Was Then” will be on display at SCAD through July 24, 2016. (via Designboom)







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Architectural Watercolors of a Dreamlike Warsaw by Tytus Brzozowski 


Architect and watercolorist Tytus Brzozowski imagines a dreamlike world where giant structures rest on towering stilts and trains seem to emerge from tunnels in the side of residential buildings. Unusual motifs like dice and teapots dot the landscape (or float through the air), and yet everything seems in its place, a credibility attributed to elements lifted directly from the architecture seen on the streets of Warsaw, Poland. Brzozowski refers to his watercolor paintings as “the city of his dreams,” and just as dreams seem to defy space and time, his paintings bring together elements of the present and past. You can see more of his work on Facebook and many of his pieces are available as prints through Lumarte. (via Colossal Submissions)









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Portraits of Chinese Rockstars Imagined as Monumental Temples 


Chinese artist DU Kun has long harbored a reverence for music and rockstars. A musician himself, the Beijing-based painter is awed by the creation of music, aspects of fame, and the intangible aura of being a revered rockstar, something he tries to capture is these temple-like portraits of famous Chinese recording artists titled “Revels of the Rock Gods”.

Each oil painting depicts the face of a musician as if it were a temple built in devotion to a god and borrows elements from Buddhist and Confucian architecture. Eyes are depicted as windows, tree branches or waterfalls as flowing hair, and the surface of skin as ornate wood facades gilded with gold.

Kun is currently exhibiting the “Revels of the Rock Gods” series as part of his first solo show in Japan at Mizuma Art Gallery in Tokyo through February 13, 2016. You can explore close-up details plus an archive of Kun’s work on his website. (via Hi-Fructose)










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