Tag Archives: architecture

Miniature Environments and Relief Sculptures Incorporated into Stones and the Backs of Animals by Song Kang 

Portland-based artist and illustrator Song Kang creates highly textural work, whether that’s in her drawn explorations or sculptures produced from found and natural materials. Her miniature works are dream-like environments and houses, many built on backs of animals like oxen and camels. Kang likes to imagine these sculptures as visual scavenger hunts, and often inserts even tinier occupants that sit and stand around her micro-cities.

For her Carved in Stone series, Kang imposes architectural forms onto the surfaces of found rocks. “The structures follow the curvature of the rocks, skewing the perspective and creating surreal environments,” Kang shares. “By becoming part of the surface rather than projecting outwards, the architecture becomes almost textural, a relief sculpture.”

You can see more of Kang’s two and three dimensional work on her Instagram and Behance.

   

 

See related posts on Colossal about , , .

Architect Ricardo Bofill’s Abandoned Cement Factory Residence and Studio 

In 1973 Spanish architect Ricardo Bofill stumbled upon a cement factory in Catalonia, Spain, an enormous compound of silos and buildings that covered nearly two and a half miles of underground tunnels. Bofill decided to buy The World War I era structure and its grounds, making modifications to the original structure in order to create an all-inclusive live/work space that would unite the Surrealist, Abstract, and Brutalist elements found in its industrial form.

Original construction to transform the sprawling series of buildings took a little over a year and a half. After the dust cleared from the jack hammers and dynamite, Catalan craftsmen worked to add gardens and purpose back into the abandoned compound. Today the factory holds a cathedral, model workshop, archive rooms, residence, and studio, a workspace for Bofill’s firm spread over four floors in the factory’s silos and connected by a spiral staircase.

Despite over forty years in the making, the entire project is constantly evolving and is one that Bofill never sees as being fully completed. With continuous tweaks, Bofill has created a perfectly programmed existence, a ritualized lifestyle that goes against his previously nomadic early life.

“I have the impression of living in a precinct, in a closed universe which protects me from the outside and everyday life,” said Bofill on his website. “The Cement Factory is a place of work par excellence. Life goes on here in a continuous sequence, with very little difference between work and leisure.”

You can see more images of the garden-covered structures on Bofill’s website, and see a short Nowness documentary on his studio and residence below. (via Designboom)

See related posts on Colossal about , , , .

Miniature Narrative-Based Sculptures Created From Balsa Wood by Vera van Wolferen 

Dutch multidisciplinary artist Vera van Wolferen (previously) produces miniature balsa wood sculptures, architectural objects that are either incorporated into animations or left motionless to tell their own stories. Her static works are often displayed beneath glass bell jars, leaving the audience to imagine that the tiny tree houses, cottages, and campers are neatly contained within their own universes. Van Wolferen also uses simple craft materials like cotton to enhance her sets, making it appear as if her sculpted homes are resting amongst the clouds.

You can view more of van Wolferen’s wood sculptures and sets, as well as some of her cut paper illustrations, on her InstagramFacebook and Behance.

See related posts on Colossal about , , , .

A Sprawling Coral-Like Structure Suspended Above an Orlando Convention Center by Marc Fornes 

All photos © Marc Fornes / The Very Many

An interconnected pathway of tubular branches hangs above the Orange County Convention Center (OCCC) in Orlando, Florida, an installation produced from perforated aluminum by architect Marc Fornes and his studio The Very ManyUnder Magnitude, which appears like a large segment of bleached coral, is composed of over 4,600 strips of metal, each just a millimeter thick. When formed into tubes however, the material increases in strength, allowing it to be walked over without damage.

This installation is suspended from the OCCC’s atrium to create a sort of secondary ceiling, its white surface highlighted by the windows that surround it. Passersby can view the work from both above and below, allowing the hollow structure to be seen from multiple vantage points.

“Borrowing and mismatching elements from the world, pushing them out of scale and hybridising them to the realm of the bizarre, the structure achieves a familiar yet mysterious quality, at once friendly and alien,” said The Very Many in Dezeen.

Under Magnitude is based on a previous nonlinear structure titled nonLin/Lin Pavilion installed at the FRAC Centre in Orleans, France by Fornes and his studio in 2011. You can see more projects by the art+architectural studio on their website, and view a behind-the-scenes video of Under Magnitude below. (via NOTCOT, Dezeen)

See related posts on Colossal about , .

Observe the Aurora Borealis From Snøhetta’s Swedish Treetop Cabin 

Gazing up, the first thing you notice when viewing the 33-foot tall cabin, The 7th Room, is its base, an aluminum covering featuring black and white images of the pine trees that surround the structure. Used as camouflage, this exterior panel immerses the treetop cabin into its environment, blurring the boundaries between the building and forest. Designed by architecture firm Snøhetta, the structure is also intended to bring visitors closer to nature, built with a suspended net at its center, and several floor-to-ceiling windows that allow for multiple viewpoints of the Aurora Borealis overhead.

The 7th Room is one of seven cabins available through northern Sweden’s Treehotel. You can view the other six cabins that compose the alternative hotel, like The Mirror Cube, on their website. (via Designboom)

See related posts on Colossal about , , , .

Artist Vasco Mourao Illustrates ‘Infinite’ Skyscrapers on Circular Pieces of Plywood 

ouroborus-1

As part of his new series titled Ouroborus, Barcelona-based artist Vasco Mourao (aka Mister Mourao) drew intricate buildings that flow in a continuous loop on pieces of cut plywood. He refers to himself as “an architect turned into an illustrator with a tendency for obsessive drawing,” and such a description couldn’t be more accurate. Mourao’s dense structural designs have also been executed on walls, paper, and other canvases and just barely seem contained on these wooden circuits.

The Ouroborus series was recently on view at Espacio 88 in Barcelona, and a few of the original works are still available in his online shop. (via Hi-Fructose)

ouroborus-2

ouroborus-3

ouroborus-4

ouroborus-5

ouroborus-6

ouroborus-7

ouroborus-8

ouroborus-9

See related posts on Colossal about , , .

Page 4 of 36«...3456...»