Tag Archives: architecture

New Miniature Architectural Structures Carved Into Raw Stone by Matthew Simmonds 

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“Corona” (2016), Faxe limestone, height 30cm

Matthew Simmonds (previously) sculpts miniature architectural structures from raw stone. Part of his interest in producing these pieces is centered around the contrast between the carved precision of his hand against the rough nature of the natural material he chooses for each work. The pieces’ concept also deals with this human influence on raw environments, humans physically displaying their beliefs and achievements by building large physical forms.

“In my sculptures I am concerned with the common human achievement; the cultural expressions thrown up by different societies, and how the various cultural traditions interact with and influence each other,” said Simmonds in an interview with Colossal. “Stone is the thing that survives the most from older times, and has an inherent sense of strength and permanence that has given it a central role in historical architecture. It is also a natural material, and in this way it inherently has a connection with the Earth’s past.”

Simmonds work Ringrone was commissioned for a client who owns a castle in Ireland that lays in ruin. Simmonds’ sculpture depicts what he believes to be the castle’s original appearance as a “tower house” from the 15th century in which vaulted rooms would be stacked upon each other with twisting passages. The miniature form responds to this internal maze by its play with light, which he hopes “encourages this sense of exploration.”

You can see more of the Copenhagen-based artist’s work on his website.

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“Tetraconch” (2015), limestone, height 31cm, all images courtesy of Matthew Simmonds

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“Ringrone” (2016), Faxe limestone, height 61cm

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“Ringrone” (2016), Faxe limestone, height 61cm

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“Ringrone” (2016), Faxe limestone, height 61cm

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“Ringrone” (2016), Faxe limestone, height 61cm

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“Ringrone” (2016), Faxe limestone, height 61cm

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Ringrone – material, Faxe limestone, 2016, height 61cm

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“Ararat: study II” (2016), Faxe limestone, height 20cm

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This New Cycle and Pedestrian Tunnel in Amsterdam Features an 80,000 Tile Mural Inspired by Cornelis Boumeester 

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Recently constructed by Benthem Crouwel, this expansive new pedestrian and cycling tunnel in Amsterdam features a fantastic tile mural depicting a fleet of ships in rough seas. The 361-foot path called the Cuyperspassage connects the city center to the IJ waterfront and sees some 15,000 commuters daily.

The darker cycling lane incorporates sound-absorbing asphalt and steel grates, while the pedestrian side is almost completely wrapped in a mural of 80,000 delft blue tiles. The artwork was designed by artist Irma Boom, heavily inspired by the work of Dutch tile artist Cornelis Boumeester. The two lanes are further delineated by LEDs to create a safe multi-function corridor with minimal barriers. From Benthem Crouwel:

Along the footpath wall is a tile tableau designed by Irma Boom Office. The design steps off from a restored work by the Rotterdam tile painter Cornelis Boumeester (1652-1733). His tile panel depicting the Warship Rotterdam and the Herring Fleet is in the collection of the Rijksmuseum, Amsterdam. Irma Boom replaced the original crest on the stern with the Amsterdam coat of arms. The cyclist or pedestrian leaves the old historic part of Amsterdam through Cuyperspassage and heads towards ‘new Amsterdam’ in the north, or vice versa. The tableau fades away towards the IJ-river, the lines of the original work gradually dissolving. Then it builds up again in an abstract form from light to dark blue, as if encouraging cyclists to slow down as the ferry comes into view.

You can see more views and read more about the Cuyperspassage on both Arch Daily and Designboom.

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Okuda San Miguel Wraps a Moroccan Church in a Vibrant Geometric Mural 

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All images courtesy of Ink and Movement

After covering a church turned skatepark in Spain with his signature style of murals, Okuda San Miguel (previously) has now transformed an abandoned Moroccan church into a 360-degree mural titled “11 Mirages to Freedom.” The street artist covered the structure in geometric bears, birds, and human faces, produced as a part of the British Council‘s Street Art Caravane Initiative. Working with the architecture already in place, San Miguel painted each of the building’s eleven faces while incorporating the structure’s barred windows. These he formed into bird cages, hats, and masks that are seamlessly incorporated…as long as you don’t look into the barred openings.

The church is uniformly painted in a brilliant shade of yellow, with smaller architectural details painted in equally vibrant colors. You can see more of San Miguel’s murals in the video Infinite World included below, as well as on the artist’s Instagram. (via Web Urbanist)

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Macro Photographs of Nature’s Tiniest Architects by Nicky Bay 

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Bagworm moth larva (Psychidae), all images courtesy of Nicky Bay

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Bagworm moth larva (Psychidae)

Nicky Bay (previously here and here) is the master of capturing the exceptionally small, photographing insects typically passed over without acknowledgement or recognition. The Singapore-based photographer stays acutely aware of these tiny creatures, using macro photography to highlight each minuscule detail. While taking a closer look at the micro world found deep in the rainforest, Bay began to notice tiny structures built by his favorite subject. The bug buildings appear manmade—tiny log cabins, gates, tents, and fortresses blocking each insect from the world just beyond their carefully placed twigs and segments of silk.

My favorite microscopic discovery of Bay’s was the Bagworm moth larva’s twisting stack of twigs it builds to protect itself as it grows inside. These stacked structures are almost perfect in their symmetry, each side built with twigs that are equal in length and width. Another favorite is the Arctiinae moth pupa’s cage produced from caterpillar hair and silk, a semi-protective fortress that appears almost like chicken wire.

Ray has collected several other examples of these tiny architects, including a web tower and silk-covered tent which you can see over on his macro photography blog. You can also follow his day-to-day macro photography on Facebook.

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Bagworm moth larva (Psychidae)

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Web tower structure, image by Jeff Cremer

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Arctiine moth pupa (Cyana sp.)

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Arctiine moth pupa (Cyana sp.)

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Arctiine moth pupa (Cyana sp.)

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Arctiine moth pupa (Cyana sp.)

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Bagworm Moth

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Bagworm moth larva (Psychidae)

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The Tessellated and Elaborately Detailed Ceilings of Iranian Mosques 

Celling of Hazrate-masomeh's mosque in Qom, Iran

Celling of Hazrate-Masomeh’s mosque in Qom, Iran, all images courtesy of Mehrdad Rasoulifard (@m1rasoulifard)

Capturing the intricately tiled ceilings of centuries old mosques, Instagram photographer Mehrdad Rasoulifard (@m1rasoulifard) gives his followers both a history lesson and aesthetic treat. The ceilings are not only covered in rich patterns, but architecturally structured to appear like complex tessellations or honeycombs. The mosques are built to include spiraling series of domes and indents, causing the viewer to get lost in their disorienting beauty.

Often Iranian architecture utilizes symbolic geometry, incorporating an abundant use of circles and squares obvious in the photographed buildings’ symmetrical layouts. Popular colors incorporated into these tiled structures include gold, white, and turquoise which are typically layered onto dark blue backgrounds.

The oldest structure photographed is over 900-years-old which hints at the vast architectural history found in Iran. You can see more of the country’s detailed places of worship and observation on Rasoulifard’s Instagram. (via Designboom)

Celling of Hazrate-masomeh's mosque in Qom, Iran

Celling of Hazrate-Masomeh’s mosque in Qom, Iran

Celling of Hazrate-masomeh's mosque in Qom, Iran

Celling of Hazrate-Masomeh’s mosque in Qom, Iran

Celling of Sheikh-lotfollah's mosque in Esfahan, Iran

Celling of Sheikh-Lotfollah’s mosque in Esfahan, Iran

Sheikh lotfollah mosque in Esfahan,Iran, about 400 years old

Sheikh Lotfollah mosque in Esfahan,Iran, about 400 years old

Sheikh lotfollah mosque in Esfahan, Iran, about 400 years old

Sheikh Lotfollah mosque in Esfahan, Iran, about 400 years old

Celling of Shahe-cheragh's mosque in Shiraz, Iran

Celling of Shahe-Cheragh’s mosque in Shiraz, Iran

Celling of Jameh's mosque in Esfahan, Iran, 900 years old

Celling of Jameh’s mosque in Esfahan, Iran, 900 years old

Celling of Hazrate-masomeh's mosque in Qom, Iran

Celling of Hazrate-Masomeh’s mosque in Qom, Iran

Celling of Nasir-Al-Molk's mosque in Shiraz,Iran

Celling of Nasir-Al-Molk’s mosque in Shiraz,Iran

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A 300-Foot Tunnel Excavated Through Walls Examines the Creative and Destructive Powers of Mankind 

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All images courtesy Daniel Arsham

In his latest exhibition, “The Future Was Then,”  Daniel Arsham (previously here and here) carved a path through the SCAD Museum of Art’s Pamela Elaine Poetter Gallery utilizing a series of faux concrete walls. The 300-foot-long series of walls starts with the cutout of an abstract shape roughly the size of a human body. As one looks at the progression of carvings and walls, the holes begin to form a representational shape, ending in the fully formed outline of a life-size human.

The “Wall Excavation” installation explores how mankind interacts with architecture, continuously building and destroying the walls around them. This central installation points to this idea directly, showing the path of destruction around a singular human form. By standing between the carved walls, visitors can literally place themselves in the the timeline of our intimate history with architecture, finding their own place amidst the excavated exhibition.

You can follow Arsham’s work on Twitter and Instagram, and learn more about his collaborative art and architecture project Snarkitecture here. “The Future Was Then” will be on display at SCAD through July 24, 2016. (via Designboom)

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