Tag Archives: architecture

Portraits of Chinese Rockstars Imagined as Monumental Temples 

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Chinese artist DU Kun has long harbored a reverence for music and rockstars. A musician himself, the Beijing-based painter is awed by the creation of music, aspects of fame, and the intangible aura of being a revered rockstar, something he tries to capture is these temple-like portraits of famous Chinese recording artists titled “Revels of the Rock Gods”.

Each oil painting depicts the face of a musician as if it were a temple built in devotion to a god and borrows elements from Buddhist and Confucian architecture. Eyes are depicted as windows, tree branches or waterfalls as flowing hair, and the surface of skin as ornate wood facades gilded with gold.

Kun is currently exhibiting the “Revels of the Rock Gods” series as part of his first solo show in Japan at Mizuma Art Gallery in Tokyo through February 13, 2016. You can explore close-up details plus an archive of Kun’s work on his website. (via Hi-Fructose)

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New Inverted Architecture Paintings by Cinta Vidal 

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“Three cities and a house,” 2015

Barcelona-based Cinta Vidal (previously) produces complex architectural constructions to express how differently individuals can occupy the same world— each inhabitant carving out their own nook, cranny, and path within a similar environment. Her new acrylic on wood panels continue to serve as a metaphor for the difficulty of understanding those around us, especially while distracted by navigating our own complicated existence.

Vidal’s paintings set domestic and natural environments in their own gravity-defying orbit, making small planets out of Bauhaus homes, secluded camping spots, and cacti-filled parks. The characters included in each work seem unaffected by the others around them, many wistfully daydreaming or lost deep within a book.

This past December Vidal presented four works with Thinkspace Gallery at Scope Miami Beach and will also show a few with the same space at the LA Art Show from January 27-31. You can read more about Vidal’s process and architectural works on her blog here.

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“Bauhaus neighbors,” 30×30 cm, acrylic on wood panel

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“Together alone,” 2015

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“Excursion,” 2015

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Commissioned painting, 2015

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“Free camping,” 50×50 cm, acrylic on wood panel

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“Rock neighbors,” 2015

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A Picturesque Mountaintop Skywalk in the Czech Republic with a 330 Foot Slide Down 

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All images by Jakub Skokan, Martin Tůma / BoysPlayNice

Extended over a cliff nearly 3,600 feet above sea level rests the Dolni Morava Sky Walk, a looping structure that allows visitors the opportunity to peek their heads into the clouds. Extending like an old-fashioned roller coaster from the Králický Sněžník mountain in the Czech Republic, the architectural destination features panoramic views of the Morava river and Krkonoše Mountains.

Produced by Fránek Architects, the wood and steel walkway was designed to blend into the existing environment rather than upset the appearance of its natural surroundings. With a subtle slope and wide pathway, the structure also accommodates those in wheelchairs and strollers who want to explore the top.

Unlike glass-bottom feats of architecture like China’s Haohan Qiao bridge and Chicago’s Willis Tower, the Sky Walk features a far more terrifying mesh floor that allows brave visitors to lay at the peak of the structure. In addition to this daredevil net, the walkway also features a 330 foot slide within its core, a streamlined metal chute that’s nearly 18 stories tall. You can read more about the Sky Walk’s concept on Frànek Architects’ site here. (via Dezeen)

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Interactive Seesaws on the Streets of Montreal Emit Light and Musical Harmonies 

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Image © Ulysse Lemerise

Currently on view at the Place Des Festivals in Montreal, Impulse is a new public art installation comprised of 30 completely illuminated seesaws and a series of video-projections on nearby building facades. When the seesaws are used they “activated” and begin to emit tones resulting in various musical harmonies. The project is part of a collaboration between CS Design and Toronto-based Lateral Office.

“Once in motion, the built-in lights and speakers produce a harmonious sequence of sounds and lights, resulting in a constantly evolving ephemeral composition,” say organizers of the event. This past summer the project was selected as a winner of the 6th annual Luminothérapie event.

Impulse will be on display through January 31, 2016, and you can see a bit more over on Arch Daily. (via Dezeen)

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Micro Matter: Vertical Dwellings Inside Glass Test Tubes by Rosa de Jong 

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For her series Micro Matter, Amsterdam-based designer and art director Rosa de Jong created towering houses and tall buildings inside the narrow confines of large glass test tubes. Perhaps comparable to a ship in bottle, the little houses and buildings are all handmade using natural objects and some model making elements like faux moss. Some pieces even play with gravity and appear to grow both upward and downward, reminding me of paintings by Cinta Vidal or sculptures by Thomas Doyle. See more over on Behance. (via Lustik)

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A 100-Year-Old Church in Spain Transformed into a Skate Park Covered in Murals by Okuda San Miguel 

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Photo by Lucho Vidales

Originally designed by Asturian architect Manuel del Busto in 1912, the church of Santa Barbara in Llanera, Asturias, was abandoned for years and crumbling from neglect. Luckily, a group of enterprising individuals lead by a collective called the ‘Church Brigade,’ with help from online fundraising and Red Bull, the church was salvaged and turned into a public skate park dubbed Kaos Temple.

As if having a skate park inside a beautiful abandoned church wasn’t enough, artist Okuda San Miguel was commissioned to cover the walls and vaulted ceilings with his unique brand of colorful geometric figures. Nearly every flat interior surface is covered with a rainbow of color, illuminated from every side by tall windows, making this a truly special place to skate. Watch the video below to see an interview with Okuda where he talks about his inspiration both for Kaos temple and his other works around the world. (via designboom)

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