Tag Archives: architecture

A Reflective Palace of Rainbows by Kimsooja

A Reflective Palace of Rainbows by Kimsooja rainbows mirrors light installation architecture

A Reflective Palace of Rainbows by Kimsooja rainbows mirrors light installation architecture

A Reflective Palace of Rainbows by Kimsooja rainbows mirrors light installation architecture

A Reflective Palace of Rainbows by Kimsooja rainbows mirrors light installation architecture

A Reflective Palace of Rainbows by Kimsooja rainbows mirrors light installation architecture

A Reflective Palace of Rainbows by Kimsooja rainbows mirrors light installation architecture

Created in 2006 by multidisciplinary artist Kimsooja, To Breathe – A Mirror Woman was an elaborate installation at the Palacio de Cristal, Parque del Retiro, in Madrid. Originally built in the late 1880s to house a collection of flora and fauna from the Philippines, Kimsooja transformed the Palacio de Cristal into a multisensory sound and light experience. A special translucent diffraction film was used to cover the windows to create an array of naturally occurring rainbows which were in turn reflected by a mirrored surface that covered the entire floor. Additionally, an audio recording of the artist breathing was played throughout the space to further enhance the experience. The installation was on view through the end of the summer and you can read much more about it here.

Kimsooja most recently wrapped the Korean Pavilion with a similar film treatment at the 2013 Venice Art Biennale. (via My Amp Goes to 11)

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Photographer Víctor Enrich Imagines the Same Building in Munich Configured in 88 Ways

Photographer Víctor Enrich Imagines the Same Building in Munich Configured in 88 Ways digital architecture

Photographer Víctor Enrich Imagines the Same Building in Munich Configured in 88 Ways digital architecture

Photographer Víctor Enrich Imagines the Same Building in Munich Configured in 88 Ways digital architecture

Photographer Víctor Enrich Imagines the Same Building in Munich Configured in 88 Ways digital architecture

Photographer Víctor Enrich Imagines the Same Building in Munich Configured in 88 Ways digital architecture

Photographer Víctor Enrich Imagines the Same Building in Munich Configured in 88 Ways digital architecture

Photographer Víctor Enrich Imagines the Same Building in Munich Configured in 88 Ways digital architecture

Photographer Víctor Enrich Imagines the Same Building in Munich Configured in 88 Ways digital architecture

As part of his latest project NHDK, photographer Víctor Enrich challenged himself to digitally reconfigure the same building in Munich, Germany in 88 different configurations. The Barcelona-based artist is known for his warped and skewed interpretations of architecture in locations around the world including an extensive series of images shot in Tel Aviv back in 2010. All of the photos are avilable as prints which you can pickup on his website. (thnx, Nacho!)

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Gingerbread Art Museums by Caitlin Levin and Henry Hargreaves

Gingerbread Art Museums by Caitlin Levin and Henry Hargreaves food candy architecture
Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York, Frank Lloyd Wright. Icing, gingerbread, cotton candy, candy wrappers, licorice, sugar.

Gingerbread Art Museums by Caitlin Levin and Henry Hargreaves food candy architecture
Karuizawa Museum, Nagano, Yasui Hideo. Chocolate, gingerbread, hard candy, cotton candy, sour flush.

Gingerbread Art Museums by Caitlin Levin and Henry Hargreaves food candy architecture
The Louvre, Paris, I.M.Pei. Gingerbread, hard candy, licorice.

Gingerbread Art Museums by Caitlin Levin and Henry Hargreaves food candy architecture
Museum Aan de Stroom (MAS), Antwerp, Neutelings Riedijk Architects. Gingerbread, lego candy, hard candy, sesame candy, chocolate, bubble gum, sour rolls.

Gingerbread Art Museums by Caitlin Levin and Henry Hargreaves food candy architecture
Maxxi – National Museum of the 21st Century Arts, Rome, Zaha Hadid. Gingerbread, hard candy, lollipop sticks.

Gingerbread Art Museums by Caitlin Levin and Henry Hargreaves food candy architecture
Museo Soumaya, Mexico City, Fernando Romero. Candy balls, gingerbread, sour rolls, taffy.

Gingerbread Art Museums by Caitlin Levin and Henry Hargreaves food candy architecture
Tate Modern, London, Herzog & de Meuron. Gingerbread, hard candy, cotton candy, bubble gum.

Gingerbread Art Museums by Caitlin Levin and Henry Hargreaves food candy architecture

Gingerbread Art Museums by Caitlin Levin and Henry Hargreaves food candy architecture

Gingerbread Art Museums by Caitlin Levin and Henry Hargreaves food candy architecture

Recently completed for display at Dylan’s Candy Bar during Art Basel Miami, these towering architectural creations of the world’s most famous art museums and galleries were created with gingerbread and candy by food artists Caitlin Levin and Henry Hargreaves. An array of hard candy windows forms the iconic pyramid extension at the Louvre, while icing and gingerbread form the smooth curves of the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum. Some of the iconic structures are so immaculately detailed that once photographed in black and white they almost look like the real thing. You can see more behind the scenes photos here.

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Lucid Stead: A Transparent Cabin Built of Wood and Mirrors by Phillip K Smith III

Lucid Stead: A Transparent Cabin Built of Wood and Mirrors by Phillip K Smith III installation architecture

Lucid Stead: A Transparent Cabin Built of Wood and Mirrors by Phillip K Smith III installation architecture

Lucid Stead: A Transparent Cabin Built of Wood and Mirrors by Phillip K Smith III installation architecture

Lucid Stead: A Transparent Cabin Built of Wood and Mirrors by Phillip K Smith III installation architecture

Lucid Stead: A Transparent Cabin Built of Wood and Mirrors by Phillip K Smith III installation architecture

Lucid Stead: A Transparent Cabin Built of Wood and Mirrors by Phillip K Smith III installation architecture

Lucid Stead: A Transparent Cabin Built of Wood and Mirrors by Phillip K Smith III installation architecture

Lucid Stead: A Transparent Cabin Built of Wood and Mirrors by Phillip K Smith III installation architecture

Lucid Stead: A Transparent Cabin Built of Wood and Mirrors by Phillip K Smith III installation architecture

Lucid Stead: A Transparent Cabin Built of Wood and Mirrors by Phillip K Smith III installation architecture

Part architectural intervention and part optical illusion, Lucid Stead is a recently unveiled installation by artist Phillip K Smith III in Joshua Tree, California. The artist modified an existing 70-year-old homesteader shack by introducing mirrors to create the illusion of transparency, as the structure now takes on the lighting characteristics of anything around it. LED lighting and other custom electronic components were further installed within the building’s interior to illuminate from the interior at night. Smith says of the installation, “Lucid Stead is about tapping into the quiet and the pace of change of the desert. When you slow down and align yourself with the desert, the project begins to unfold before you. It reveals that it is about light and shadow, reflected light, projected light, and change.”

You can see more photos over at Royale Projects. All photos courtesy Royale Projects. (via Dezeen)

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Artist Do Ho Suh Compares His Previous Homes By Creating 1:1 Silk Replicas, One Inside the Other

Artist Do Ho Suh Compares His Previous Homes By Creating 1:1 Silk Replicas, One Inside the Other textiles silk sculpture installation architecture

Artist Do Ho Suh Compares His Previous Homes By Creating 1:1 Silk Replicas, One Inside the Other textiles silk sculpture installation architecture

Artist Do Ho Suh Compares His Previous Homes By Creating 1:1 Silk Replicas, One Inside the Other textiles silk sculpture installation architecture

Artist Do Ho Suh Compares His Previous Homes By Creating 1:1 Silk Replicas, One Inside the Other textiles silk sculpture installation architecture

Artist Do Ho Suh Compares His Previous Homes By Creating 1:1 Silk Replicas, One Inside the Other textiles silk sculpture installation architecture

Artist Do Ho Suh Compares His Previous Homes By Creating 1:1 Silk Replicas, One Inside the Other textiles silk sculpture installation architecture

Artist Do Ho Suh Compares His Previous Homes By Creating 1:1 Silk Replicas, One Inside the Other textiles silk sculpture installation architecture

Artist Do Ho Suh Compares His Previous Homes By Creating 1:1 Silk Replicas, One Inside the Other textiles silk sculpture installation architecture

Korean artist Do Ho Suh (previously here) has just completed his largest artwork to date at Seoul’s National Museum of Modern and Contemporary Art. Titled Home Within Home Within Home Within Home Within Home, the giant installation represents two previous residences the artist lived in at 1:1 scale, one structure inside the built with jade-colored silk evoking the feel of a 3D blueprint. The smaller structure is a traditional Korean home where Suh grew up a child which he then suspended inside a replica of his first residence in the United States, a modern apartment building in Providence, Rhode Island. The piece is so large that visitors are invited to walk inside and virtually explore it which you can do through May 14, 2014. Learn more over at Lehmann Maupin and MMCA. (via My Modern Met, Wallpaper*)

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A Rotating Disco Ball Pizza Oven by Lukas Galehr

A Rotating Disco Ball Pizza Oven by Lukas Galehr Vienna pizza food cooking architecture
Photo © Lukas Schaller

A Rotating Disco Ball Pizza Oven by Lukas Galehr Vienna pizza food cooking architecture
Photo © Lukas Schaller

A Rotating Disco Ball Pizza Oven by Lukas Galehr Vienna pizza food cooking architecture
Photo © Lukas Schaller

A Rotating Disco Ball Pizza Oven by Lukas Galehr Vienna pizza food cooking architecture
Photo © Lukas Schaller

A Rotating Disco Ball Pizza Oven by Lukas Galehr Vienna pizza food cooking architecture
Photo © Lukas Schaller

Designed by Austrian architect Lukas Galehr for the recently-opened ‘Disco Volante’ pizzeria in Vienna, this fully-functional pizza oven has been designed to look like a gigantic reflective disco ball. And yes, it even rotates. Via Madame Mohr:

According to the clients wish the restaurant should not only carry the atmosphere of a southern Italian pizzeria but also transport the lightness of the “Italo-Disco” era of the 1970s and 80s.

The heart of every pizzeria is the wood fired oven which in this case is a giant disco ball with a rotating mechanism. After the dough is run out the Pizzaioli start the engine and the oven begins to slowly turn with about 1 revolution per minute.

You can see many more photos here and over on iGnant. Photos by Lukas Schaller. (via Dezeen)

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A 15th Century Cathedral Transformed into a Modern Bookstore

A 15th Century Cathedral Transformed into a Modern Bookstore churches books architecture

A 15th Century Cathedral Transformed into a Modern Bookstore churches books architecture

A 15th Century Cathedral Transformed into a Modern Bookstore churches books architecture

A 15th Century Cathedral Transformed into a Modern Bookstore churches books architecture

A 15th Century Cathedral Transformed into a Modern Bookstore churches books architecture

A 15th Century Cathedral Transformed into a Modern Bookstore churches books architecture

A 15th Century Cathedral Transformed into a Modern Bookstore churches books architecture

For many, reading a good book can be a religious experience, but this new bookstore in Zwolle, The Netherlands takes that idea to a whole new level. Architects BK. Architecten were tasked with converting this 15th century Dominican church into a modern bookstore with the addition of 700 square meters of shopping space. But there was one major catch: all the historical elements of the 547-year-old building including stained glass windows, pipe organ, ceiling paintings and expansive arches had to remain intact.

Incredibly, BK. Architecten managed to add three levels of retail space to the side wings of the church in a manner that the entire structure can one day be removed in order to restore the church to its original design. In addition only three colors of building materials were used to mimic the existing palette of the cathedral’s interior to further ensure that the bookstore would pay reverence to the original space.

Waanders in de Broeren opened earlier this summer and you can see many more views on the architect’s website. Photos by Joop van Putten and Hans Westerink. If you liked this you might also enjoy reading about a Walmart being converted into the largest single-story library in the United States. (via Arch Daily)

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