Tag Archives: architecture

Lucid Stead: A Transparent Cabin Built of Wood and Mirrors by Phillip K Smith III

Lucid Stead: A Transparent Cabin Built of Wood and Mirrors by Phillip K Smith III installation architecture

Lucid Stead: A Transparent Cabin Built of Wood and Mirrors by Phillip K Smith III installation architecture

Lucid Stead: A Transparent Cabin Built of Wood and Mirrors by Phillip K Smith III installation architecture

Lucid Stead: A Transparent Cabin Built of Wood and Mirrors by Phillip K Smith III installation architecture

Lucid Stead: A Transparent Cabin Built of Wood and Mirrors by Phillip K Smith III installation architecture

Lucid Stead: A Transparent Cabin Built of Wood and Mirrors by Phillip K Smith III installation architecture

Lucid Stead: A Transparent Cabin Built of Wood and Mirrors by Phillip K Smith III installation architecture

Lucid Stead: A Transparent Cabin Built of Wood and Mirrors by Phillip K Smith III installation architecture

Lucid Stead: A Transparent Cabin Built of Wood and Mirrors by Phillip K Smith III installation architecture

Lucid Stead: A Transparent Cabin Built of Wood and Mirrors by Phillip K Smith III installation architecture

Part architectural intervention and part optical illusion, Lucid Stead is a recently unveiled installation by artist Phillip K Smith III in Joshua Tree, California. The artist modified an existing 70-year-old homesteader shack by introducing mirrors to create the illusion of transparency, as the structure now takes on the lighting characteristics of anything around it. LED lighting and other custom electronic components were further installed within the building’s interior to illuminate from the interior at night. Smith says of the installation, “Lucid Stead is about tapping into the quiet and the pace of change of the desert. When you slow down and align yourself with the desert, the project begins to unfold before you. It reveals that it is about light and shadow, reflected light, projected light, and change.”

You can see more photos over at Royale Projects. All photos courtesy Royale Projects. (via Dezeen)

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Artist Do Ho Suh Compares His Previous Homes By Creating 1:1 Silk Replicas, One Inside the Other

Artist Do Ho Suh Compares His Previous Homes By Creating 1:1 Silk Replicas, One Inside the Other textiles silk sculpture installation architecture

Artist Do Ho Suh Compares His Previous Homes By Creating 1:1 Silk Replicas, One Inside the Other textiles silk sculpture installation architecture

Artist Do Ho Suh Compares His Previous Homes By Creating 1:1 Silk Replicas, One Inside the Other textiles silk sculpture installation architecture

Artist Do Ho Suh Compares His Previous Homes By Creating 1:1 Silk Replicas, One Inside the Other textiles silk sculpture installation architecture

Artist Do Ho Suh Compares His Previous Homes By Creating 1:1 Silk Replicas, One Inside the Other textiles silk sculpture installation architecture

Artist Do Ho Suh Compares His Previous Homes By Creating 1:1 Silk Replicas, One Inside the Other textiles silk sculpture installation architecture

Artist Do Ho Suh Compares His Previous Homes By Creating 1:1 Silk Replicas, One Inside the Other textiles silk sculpture installation architecture

Artist Do Ho Suh Compares His Previous Homes By Creating 1:1 Silk Replicas, One Inside the Other textiles silk sculpture installation architecture

Korean artist Do Ho Suh (previously here) has just completed his largest artwork to date at Seoul’s National Museum of Modern and Contemporary Art. Titled Home Within Home Within Home Within Home Within Home, the giant installation represents two previous residences the artist lived in at 1:1 scale, one structure inside the built with jade-colored silk evoking the feel of a 3D blueprint. The smaller structure is a traditional Korean home where Suh grew up a child which he then suspended inside a replica of his first residence in the United States, a modern apartment building in Providence, Rhode Island. The piece is so large that visitors are invited to walk inside and virtually explore it which you can do through May 14, 2014. Learn more over at Lehmann Maupin and MMCA. (via My Modern Met, Wallpaper*)

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A Rotating Disco Ball Pizza Oven by Lukas Galehr

A Rotating Disco Ball Pizza Oven by Lukas Galehr Vienna pizza cooking architecture
Photo © Lukas Schaller

A Rotating Disco Ball Pizza Oven by Lukas Galehr Vienna pizza cooking architecture
Photo © Lukas Schaller

A Rotating Disco Ball Pizza Oven by Lukas Galehr Vienna pizza cooking architecture
Photo © Lukas Schaller

A Rotating Disco Ball Pizza Oven by Lukas Galehr Vienna pizza cooking architecture
Photo © Lukas Schaller

A Rotating Disco Ball Pizza Oven by Lukas Galehr Vienna pizza cooking architecture
Photo © Lukas Schaller

Designed by Austrian architect Lukas Galehr for the recently-opened ‘Disco Volante’ pizzeria in Vienna, this fully-functional pizza oven has been designed to look like a gigantic reflective disco ball. And yes, it even rotates. Via Madame Mohr:

According to the clients wish the restaurant should not only carry the atmosphere of a southern Italian pizzeria but also transport the lightness of the “Italo-Disco” era of the 1970s and 80s.

The heart of every pizzeria is the wood fired oven which in this case is a giant disco ball with a rotating mechanism. After the dough is run out the Pizzaioli start the engine and the oven begins to slowly turn with about 1 revolution per minute.

You can see many more photos here and over on iGnant. Photos by Lukas Schaller. (via Dezeen)

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A 15th Century Cathedral Transformed into a Modern Bookstore

A 15th Century Cathedral Transformed into a Modern Bookstore churches books architecture

A 15th Century Cathedral Transformed into a Modern Bookstore churches books architecture

A 15th Century Cathedral Transformed into a Modern Bookstore churches books architecture

A 15th Century Cathedral Transformed into a Modern Bookstore churches books architecture

A 15th Century Cathedral Transformed into a Modern Bookstore churches books architecture

A 15th Century Cathedral Transformed into a Modern Bookstore churches books architecture

A 15th Century Cathedral Transformed into a Modern Bookstore churches books architecture

For many, reading a good book can be a religious experience, but this new bookstore in Zwolle, The Netherlands takes that idea to a whole new level. Architects BK. Architecten were tasked with converting this 15th century Dominican church into a modern bookstore with the addition of 700 square meters of shopping space. But there was one major catch: all the historical elements of the 547-year-old building including stained glass windows, pipe organ, ceiling paintings and expansive arches had to remain intact.

Incredibly, BK. Architecten managed to add three levels of retail space to the side wings of the church in a manner that the entire structure can one day be removed in order to restore the church to its original design. In addition only three colors of building materials were used to mimic the existing palette of the cathedral’s interior to further ensure that the bookstore would pay reverence to the original space.

Waanders in de Broeren opened earlier this summer and you can see many more views on the architect’s website. Photos by Joop van Putten and Hans Westerink. If you liked this you might also enjoy reading about a Walmart being converted into the largest single-story library in the United States. (via Arch Daily)

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A Brick Facade Appears to Melt Off of an Apartment Building in Margate

A Brick Facade Appears to Melt Off of an Apartment Building in Margate installation architecture
Photo by Stephen O’Flaherty

A Brick Facade Appears to Melt Off of an Apartment Building in Margate installation architecture
Photos by Stephen O’Flaherty

A Brick Facade Appears to Melt Off of an Apartment Building in Margate installation architecture
Photo by Stephen O’Flaherty

A Brick Facade Appears to Melt Off of an Apartment Building in Margate installation architecture
Photos by Stephen O’Flaherty

A Brick Facade Appears to Melt Off of an Apartment Building in Margate installation architecture
Photo by Stephen O’Flaherty

Created by British designer Alex Chinneck, this fun intervention creates the illusion that a brick facade has melted right off the side of a building and into the front yard. Titled From the Knees of my Nose to the Belly of my Toes, the piece was installed in the English seaside town of Margate, and the artist chose to present it without any identifying information, leaving locals amused and scratching their heads.

Chinneck spent the better part of 12 months engineering the installation and worked with several companies that offered to donate materials. He tells Dezeen that he’s fascinated with spectacles and that he “wanted to create something that used the simple pleasures of humour, illusion and theatre to create an artwork that can be understood and enjoyed by any onlooker.” The piece will be on view for a year before the building is eventually demolished. Read and see more over on Dezeen.

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New Video Depicts the Amazing Final Stages of Construction of the Sagrada Família in Barcelona

New Video Depicts the Amazing Final Stages of Construction of the Sagrada Família in Barcelona Spain churches Barcelona architecture

New Video Depicts the Amazing Final Stages of Construction of the Sagrada Família in Barcelona Spain churches Barcelona architecture

The foundation responsible for the construction of the famous Sagrada Família church in Barcelona recently released a video depicting what the final stages of construction will look like as nearly 150 years of building (and delays) finally wraps up in 2026. The breathtaking clip combines footage shot from a helicopter with computer-animated renderings to show what the basilica, designed by Antoni Gaudí, will look like. The structure is said to be “the most extraordinary personal interpretation of Gothic architecture since the Middle Ages.” Read more over on Co.Design. (via Design TAXI)

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Ark Nova: World’s First Inflatable Concert Hall Will Tour Recovering Areas in Japan

Ark Nova: Worlds First Inflatable Concert Hall Will Tour Recovering Areas in Japan music Japan architecture

Ark Nova: Worlds First Inflatable Concert Hall Will Tour Recovering Areas in Japan music Japan architecture

Ark Nova: Worlds First Inflatable Concert Hall Will Tour Recovering Areas in Japan music Japan architecture

Ark Nova: Worlds First Inflatable Concert Hall Will Tour Recovering Areas in Japan music Japan architecture

Ark Nova: Worlds First Inflatable Concert Hall Will Tour Recovering Areas in Japan music Japan architecture

Ark Nova: Worlds First Inflatable Concert Hall Will Tour Recovering Areas in Japan music Japan architecture

Ark Nova: Worlds First Inflatable Concert Hall Will Tour Recovering Areas in Japan music Japan architecture

Ark Nova: Worlds First Inflatable Concert Hall Will Tour Recovering Areas in Japan music Japan architecture

Designed through a unique collaboration between sculptor Anish Kapoor, architect Arata Isozaki, and the Lucerne Festival, Ark Nova is the first large-scale infalatable concert hall ever constructed. Conceived over a year ago, the mobile structure will open to the public on October 14th and will be host to concerts, events, and workshops in tsunami-damaged areas around the country.

Made from a translucent purple membrane reminiscent of a parachute, the organic structure can inflate in roughly two hours and seats up to 500 people, and will be easily transported around the region. Additionally, wood from tsunami-damaged cedar trees at the Zuiganji Temple in Matsushima was repurposed to build seating and acoustic reflectors in the hall’s interior. You can read more about it over on Spoon & Tamago and see more photos on Lucerne Festival Ark Nova’s Facebook page.

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