Tag Archives: architecture

The Negative Space of a House Cut Inside a 908-Page Book

The Negative Space of a House Cut Inside a 908 Page Book sculpture paper home book architecture

The Negative Space of a House Cut Inside a 908 Page Book sculpture paper home book architecture

The Negative Space of a House Cut Inside a 908 Page Book sculpture paper home book architecture

The Negative Space of a House Cut Inside a 908 Page Book sculpture paper home book architecture

The Negative Space of a House Cut Inside a 908 Page Book sculpture paper home book architecture

The Negative Space of a House Cut Inside a 908 Page Book sculpture paper home book architecture

The Negative Space of a House Cut Inside a 908 Page Book sculpture paper home book architecture

Your House is limited edition artist’s book by Icelandic-Danish artist Olafur Eliasson that depicts the negative space formed by his home located outside Copenhagen. Every structural detail of the house from the roof, windows, and even a basement crawlspace are depicted within the thick layer of laser-cut paper. The 908-page books were designed by Michael Heimann and Claudia Baulesch and published by the Library Council of the Museum of Modern Art back in 2006. (via Not Shaking the Grass)

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Dreamy Architectural Watercolors by Sunga Park

Dreamy Architectural Watercolors by Sunga Park watercolor painting architecture
Paris, France

Dreamy Architectural Watercolors by Sunga Park watercolor painting architecture
Oxford, UK

Dreamy Architectural Watercolors by Sunga Park watercolor painting architecture
Oxford, UK

Dreamy Architectural Watercolors by Sunga Park watercolor painting architecture
The Whitehall street entrance, London

Dreamy Architectural Watercolors by Sunga Park watercolor painting architecture
Dongseo elevated highway, Busan

Dreamy Architectural Watercolors by Sunga Park watercolor painting architecture
Harrods, London

Dreamy Architectural Watercolors by Sunga Park watercolor painting architecture
Sacre-Coeur church in Montmartre, Paris

These architectural watercolor studies by Sunga Park seem to drip and fade out of focus like a memory or a dream. The graphic designer and illustrator currently lives and works in Busan, South Korea as a wallpaper designer but it seems her true passion is for watercolor and other artistic endeavors. See much more of her work on Behance and Flickr. If you liked this, also check out the work of Maja Wronska.

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Atom-Lapse: A Timelapse of André Waterkeyn’s Iconic Atomium Building

Atom Lapse: A Timelapse of André Waterkeyns Iconic Atomium Building timelapse Brussels atoms architecture

Atom Lapse: A Timelapse of André Waterkeyns Iconic Atomium Building timelapse Brussels atoms architecture

Atom Lapse: A Timelapse of André Waterkeyns Iconic Atomium Building timelapse Brussels atoms architecture

Designed by engineer André Waterkeyn for the 1958 World’s Fair in Brussels, Belgium, Atomium is a 102m (335 ft) tall model of a unit cell of an iron crystal (each sphere representing an atom) enlarged 165 billion times. Filmmaker Richard Bently was allowed access to shoot this great exterior and interior timelapse of the building which is comprised of 27 sequences filmed over five nights and two days. (via Vimeo)

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Architecture Student Converts Old Bus into Comfy Mobile Home Complete with Repurposed Gym Floor

Architecture Student Converts Old Bus into Comfy Mobile Home Complete with Repurposed Gym Floor wood travel buses architecture

Architecture Student Converts Old Bus into Comfy Mobile Home Complete with Repurposed Gym Floor wood travel buses architecture

Architecture Student Converts Old Bus into Comfy Mobile Home Complete with Repurposed Gym Floor wood travel buses architecture

Architecture Student Converts Old Bus into Comfy Mobile Home Complete with Repurposed Gym Floor wood travel buses architecture

Architecture Student Converts Old Bus into Comfy Mobile Home Complete with Repurposed Gym Floor wood travel buses architecture

Architecture Student Converts Old Bus into Comfy Mobile Home Complete with Repurposed Gym Floor wood travel buses architecture

Architecture Student Converts Old Bus into Comfy Mobile Home Complete with Repurposed Gym Floor wood travel buses architecture

I don’t know about you, but few exciting things ever transpired for me on a school bus. It always smelled like gas fumes, and its primary purpose was to transport me to a place I didn’t always want to to go. But this bus, designed by architecture student Hank Butitta, is a whole different story.

Also somewhat disinterested with school, Butitta was tired of designing buildings that didn’t exist for imaginary clients and wanted to work with his hands to put some of his ideas into practice. So, he bought a bus off Craigslist and along with some help from photographer Justin Evidon and brother Vince, the trio spent nearly 14 weeks converting the ramshackle old bus into a sleek, modular living environment complete with a kitchen, bathroom, beds, storage, and even a floor made from wood panels stripped from an old gymnasium.

Now that Hank’s final presentation is over the group is embarking on a 5,000 mile tour around the U.S. which has just about reached its halfway point. You can see more photos, video, and follow their travels over at Hank Bought a Bus. (via Home Designing, Gizmodo, Le Monde Tue Nini)

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An Illegal Mountain Constructed Atop a 26-Story Residential Building in Beijing

An Illegal Mountain Constructed Atop a 26 Story Residential Building in Beijing mountains China architecture

An Illegal Mountain Constructed Atop a 26 Story Residential Building in Beijing mountains China architecture

An Illegal Mountain Constructed Atop a 26 Story Residential Building in Beijing mountains China architecture

While most property and homeowners might be lucky to erect a small fence, add a new wall, or plant a few trees without applying for a permit or checking local zoning laws, things in Bejing are apparently quite different. For the last six years an eccentric doctor built a sprawling mountain villa on the roof above his top-floor flat in this 26-story residential building, all without asking permission of residents or local authorities. The enormous addition covers the entire 1000-square-metre roof and was built using artificial rocks but with real trees and grass.

It only took six years of complaints from neighbors who suffered from the noise and vibrations of heavy construction machinery, water leaks, and other disturbances to finally get the attention of authorities who recently gave the man 15 days to remove the mountain or else it will face forcible removal. Read more over on the South China Morning Post. (via dezeen)

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A Couple Leaves their Jobs to Build a House of Windows in the Mountains of West Virginia

A Couple Leaves their Jobs to Build a House of Windows in the Mountains of West Virginia  windows glass architecture

A Couple Leaves their Jobs to Build a House of Windows in the Mountains of West Virginia  windows glass architecture

A Couple Leaves their Jobs to Build a House of Windows in the Mountains of West Virginia  windows glass architecture

A Couple Leaves their Jobs to Build a House of Windows in the Mountains of West Virginia  windows glass architecture

A Couple Leaves their Jobs to Build a House of Windows in the Mountains of West Virginia  windows glass architecture

For their very first date, photographer Nick Olson took designer Lilah Horwitz on a walk in the mountains of West Virginia. While chatting and getting to know each other during a particularly scenic sunset the two jokingly wondered what it would be like to live in a house where the entire facade was windows, so the sunset would never be contained within a small space. Where most people would file the idea away as a dream or maybe an item at the bottom of a bucket list, the newly minted couple were a bit more aggressive. Less than a year later the two quit their jobs and embarked on a road trip starting in Pennsylvania to collect dozens of windows from garage sales and antique dealers. A few weeks later they arrived in West Virginia and built the glass cabin in the exact same spot where they envisioned it on their fist date.

Filmmakers Matt Glass and Jordan Wayne Long of Half Cut Tea caught up with Horwirz and Olson to learn more about the construction of the building and their unusually strong commitment to following through with their artistic visions.

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Sou Fujimoto’s Giant Serpentine Pavilion Converted into a Storm of LED Lightning by UVA

Sou Fujimotos Giant Serpentine Pavilion Converted into a Storm of LED Lightning by UVA lightning light installation architecture

Sou Fujimotos Giant Serpentine Pavilion Converted into a Storm of LED Lightning by UVA lightning light installation architecture

Sou Fujimotos Giant Serpentine Pavilion Converted into a Storm of LED Lightning by UVA lightning light installation architecture

Sou Fujimotos Giant Serpentine Pavilion Converted into a Storm of LED Lightning by UVA lightning light installation architecture

Sou Fujimotos Giant Serpentine Pavilion Converted into a Storm of LED Lightning by UVA lightning light installation architecture

Sou Fujimotos Giant Serpentine Pavilion Converted into a Storm of LED Lightning by UVA lightning light installation architecture

For the last thirteen years Serpentine Gallery has invited a guest architect to design a temporary structure on the London gallery’s front lawn. In what is billed as “the most ambitious architectural program of its kind worldwide,” designs have come from such visionaries as Ai Weiwei in 2012 and Frank Gehry in 2008. This year, Japanese architect Sou Fujimoto (who at 41 become the youngest to accept the invitation) constructed a large network of 20mm steel poles and latticed metal that covers an area of 3,800 square feet.

While the white pavilion is impressive in its own right, the gallery further commissioned London-based United Visual Artists to create a network of LED lights that are meant to mimic the natural forms of an electric storm. At night the normally grounded structure becomes an electrified geometric cloud that flashes and pulsates with light. The installation is further enhanced by an accompanied soundtrack of precisely timed soundbites including the buzzing of electrical plants, effectively creating an auditory effect of thunder. A somewhat similar intervention took place here in Chicago a few years ago when LuftWerk transformed Anish Kapoor’s Cloud Gate. (via Wired, Huffington Post)

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