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Art

‘Salt Years,’ Explores Sigalit Landau’s Lifetime Relationship With the Dead Sea

December 14, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

Israeli artist Sigalit Landau (previously) has a practice that is deeply tied to working with the Dead Sea. Landau uses the hypersaline body of water as both a photographic backdrop and medium to suspend everyday objects, creating densely salt-encrusted sculptures. The items she chooses for her pieces are sometimes simply based on their textures and shapes, while others are chosen in order to filter memories that have been passed down to the artist through her parents and grandparents.

“These objects leave ‘the game’ of being useful ‘things’ and enter a new realm – the open space of representation,” said Landau to Colossal. “They loose their old features and dimensions and inhale a certain pureness of spirit, treated by climate and enhanced by emotion.”

A new book titled Salt Years, explores Landau’s process, bringing a new perspective to her salt crystal sculptures, video art, and images created over the last 15 years. Within the book Landau explores her process of “baptizing” objects in the Dead Sea’s waters, showcasing how the salt-filled sea breathes new life into the inanimate works through behind-the-scenes photos, and personal notes and essays.

You can pre-order the 288-page book through Landau’s Indiegogo campaign, and follow its progress through the book’s Facebook.

 

 



Art

An Embroidery of Voids: A Surreal Journey through Alleyways and Narrow Spaces by Daniel Crooks

March 17, 2015

Christopher Jobson

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Trying to describe this short film by artist Daniel Crooks (previously) is a bit challenging, but once you start watching you’ll get the idea. Crooks filmed narrow passages, alleys, and other nooks and crannies that he stitched together into this seemingly infinite corridor. Make sure to turn up the volume or put on some headphones, Byron Scullin‘s sound design adds an entirely different dimension. The piece was originally commissioned by Silvia and Michael Kantor for the National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne.

The video embedded here is courtesy Anna Schwartz Gallery, and you can watch a slightly higher resolution version on Vimeo. If you enjoyed this as much as I did, you’ll also want to watch Crooks’ A Garden of Parallel Paths. (via Booooooom)

 

 



Animation Art

Artist Erdal Enci Clones Himself to Create Elaborate Choreographed GIFs

August 4, 2014

Christopher Jobson

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It’s been over a year since we last checked in with video artist Erdal Inci (previously) who clones multiple recordings of himself moving through public spaces resulting in these bizarre looping performances. Inci often carries lights or other objects which lend a sense of choreography to each video, and at times the exposure eliminates him from the scene or makes him appear shadowlike in the background. Here are a few of our favorites over the last few months but you can see more on his website and at a higher resolution on Vimeo. (via iGNANT)

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Science

Timelapse of Dormant ‘Rose of Jericho’ Plants Exploding to Life After Exposure to Water

August 3, 2014

Christopher Jobson

The Rose of Jericho (Selaginella lepidophylla) is a species of desert moss that has the amazing ability to ‘resurrect’ itself after bouts of extreme dehydration lasting months or even years. After just a few hours of exposure to moisture the plants burst to life, uncurling from a tight ball of dry leaves to a green flower-like shape. Videographer Sean Steininger shot this timelapse of several plants as he exposed them to water. (via Cause, Science!)

Update: Apparently a few places sell these plants online.

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Art

This Is What Happens When You Attach a GoPro Camera to a Moving Car Wheel

July 28, 2014

Christopher Jobson

Though we may be rapidly heading toward peak GoPro, and the number of unique scenarios where the tiny video camera is used to film something is dwindling, gems like these still persist. For his Video Sketchbook class at the University of Wisconsin, Ryan Fox attached a camera to his car wheel while driving around at night, and this is the dizzying result. This should probably come with a list of seizure/vertigo/hypnotism warnings. (via Vimeo)

Update: Hey, if you liked this, also check out Paul Octavious’ photo series of spinning vinyl, Grandpa’s Records (scroll right).

 

 



Amazing Animation

Stop-Motion Animation of Wood Cut Millimeter by Millimeter Creates Waves that Ripple Like Water

July 7, 2014

Christopher Jobson

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Waves of Grain is a two minute strata-cut animation by filmmaker Keith Skretch who planed a block of wood in tiny increments and took photographs along the way. The final video reveals a strange sense of motion as the camera moves effortlessly through the block revealing the the sinuous curves of wood grain that appears to ripple like water. If you liked this also check out these fruit and vegetable MRIs from Andy Ellison. (via Colossal Submissions)

 

 



Photography

A Multi-Camera 360° Panoramic Timelapse of the Stars by Vincent Brady

June 20, 2014

Christopher Jobson

Michigan-based photographer Vincent Brady uses an elaborate 4-camera rig and lots of software to capture what he calls Planetary Panoramas. These are somewhat similar to the tiny planet videos we’ve seen the last few months, but the results are quite a bit more dramatic. He shares about his technique:

While experimenting with different photography tricks and techniques back in 2012, I was shooting 360 degree panoramas in the daytime and long exposures of the stars streaking in the sky at night. It suddenly became clear that the potential to combine the two techniques could be a trip! Since the Earth is rotating at a steady 1,040 mph I created a custom rig of 4 cameras with fisheye lenses to capture the entire night-sky in motion. Thus the images show the stars rotating around the north star as well as the effect of the southern pole as well and a 360 degree panorama of the scene on Earth. Each camera is doing nonstop long exposures, typically about 1 minute consecutively for the life of the camera battery. Usually about 3 hours. I then made a script to stitch all the thousands of these panoramas into this time-lapse.

You can learn more about how Brady makes these and see more of his photography over on his website. (via Colossal Submissions)

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