Tag Archives: assemblage

Dollface: Bizarre Portraits Made from Repurposed Toy Parts by Freya Jobbins

Dollface: Bizarre Portraits Made from Repurposed Toy Parts by Freya Jobbins toys sculpture assemblage anatomy

Dollface: Bizarre Portraits Made from Repurposed Toy Parts by Freya Jobbins toys sculpture assemblage anatomy

Dollface: Bizarre Portraits Made from Repurposed Toy Parts by Freya Jobbins toys sculpture assemblage anatomy

Dollface: Bizarre Portraits Made from Repurposed Toy Parts by Freya Jobbins toys sculpture assemblage anatomy

Dollface: Bizarre Portraits Made from Repurposed Toy Parts by Freya Jobbins toys sculpture assemblage anatomy

Dollface: Bizarre Portraits Made from Repurposed Toy Parts by Freya Jobbins toys sculpture assemblage anatomy

Dollface: Bizarre Portraits Made from Repurposed Toy Parts by Freya Jobbins toys sculpture assemblage anatomy

Dollface: Bizarre Portraits Made from Repurposed Toy Parts by Freya Jobbins toys sculpture assemblage anatomy

Dollface: Bizarre Portraits Made from Repurposed Toy Parts by Freya Jobbins toys sculpture assemblage anatomy

Using dismembered plastic parts from old dolls and other toys, artist Freya Jobbins assembles these exceedingly strange portraits of people and pop culture icons. Chances are when viewing these you fall firmly into one of two camps: the highly amused or the highly disturbed. Regardless, it’s hard to deny the incredible amount of labor that goes into each piece, from the exploration of form and the use of color to make each anatomical amalgamation.

Born in Johannesburg, South Africa and raised in West Sydney, Jobbins is influenced in part by Guiseppe Archimboldo’s fruit and vegetable paintings as well as Ron Mueck’s oversized humans. I first encountered Jobbins’ work close-up at the Toy Cycle exhibition in Tel Aviv back in December courtesy of Kinetis, and despite the mild case of heebie-jeebies it was impossible to look away as I tried to figure out how each piece came together.

You can see more freaky faces over in Jobbin’s online gallery and on Facebook. (via Juxtapoz, FastCo)

Ornate Mixed Media Assemblages by Kris Kuksi

Ornate Mixed Media Assemblages by Kris Kuksi sculpture assemblage Unveiled Obscurity, 2013. Mixed media assemblage. 32″ x 46″ x 12″.

Ornate Mixed Media Assemblages by Kris Kuksi sculpture assemblage Unveiled Obscurity, detail.

Ornate Mixed Media Assemblages by Kris Kuksi sculpture assemblage Neo-Hellenism, 2013. Mixed media assemblage. 37″ x 35″ x 11″.

Ornate Mixed Media Assemblages by Kris Kuksi sculpture assemblage Neo-Hellenism, detail.

Ornate Mixed Media Assemblages by Kris Kuksi sculpture assemblage Intelligent Redesign, 2013. Mixed media assemblage. 40″ x 50″ x 12″.

Ornate Mixed Media Assemblages by Kris Kuksi sculpture assemblage Intelligent Redesign, detail.

Ornate Mixed Media Assemblages by Kris Kuksi sculpture assemblage Expulsion, 2013. Mixed media assemblage. 24″ x 32″ x 9″.

Ornate Mixed Media Assemblages by Kris Kuksi sculpture assemblage Expulsion, detail.

Ornate Mixed Media Assemblages by Kris Kuksi sculpture assemblage Der Ubermensch of the Post-Post World Calamity Variety, 2013. Mixed media assemblage. 54″ x 48″ x 16″.

This week Kansas-based artist Kris Kuksi (previously) opened his fourth solo show, Revival, at Joshua Liner Gallery. Kuksi continues his use of ornate assemblage to create wildly complex sculptures that comment on history, life, death, and spiritual conflict. In the words of director Guillermo del Toro:

“A postindustrial Rococo master, Kris Kuksi obsessively arranges characters and architecture with an exquisite sense of drama. Instead of stones and shells he uses screaming plastic soldiers, miniature engine blocks, towering spires and assorted debris to form his landscapes. The political, spiritual, and material conflict within these shrines is enacted under the calm gaze of remote deities and august statuary. Kuksi manages to evoke, at once, a sanctum and a mausoleum for our suffocated spirit.

Revival will be on view through January 18, 2014 and you can see many more pieces from the exhibition in this gallery.

New Animal and Insect Assemblages Made from Repurposed Objects by Edouard Martinet

New Animal and Insect Assemblages Made from Repurposed Objects by Edouard Martinet sculpture insects assemblage animals
Butterfly. 25″ x 14″ x 22″ H. Legs: bike brake parts, pieces of windshield wipers, bike chains. Abdomen: old acetylene light tank. Thorax: car suspension part, small spoon parts, cream chargers. Head: headlights, bike parts. Butterfly trunk: clock springs. Hair: pieces of a typewriter daisy wheel. Antennae: brake cables, drawer knobs.

New Animal and Insect Assemblages Made from Repurposed Objects by Edouard Martinet sculpture insects assemblage animals Butterfly, detail.

New Animal and Insect Assemblages Made from Repurposed Objects by Edouard Martinet sculpture insects assemblage animals
Butterfly, detail.

New Animal and Insect Assemblages Made from Repurposed Objects by Edouard Martinet sculpture insects assemblage animals Rhinoceros beetle. 13″ x 11″ x 6″ H. Legs: bike brake parts, bike derailleur chain, bike chain ring. Head and horn: small bike brake, pieces of a typewriter daisy wheel. Antennae: small bike parts. Thorax: shoe tree, bike Luxor headlight. Abdomen: motorbike light, shell-shaped drawer handles.

New Animal and Insect Assemblages Made from Repurposed Objects by Edouard Martinet sculpture insects assemblage animals
Rhinoceros beetle, detail.

New Animal and Insect Assemblages Made from Repurposed Objects by Edouard Martinet sculpture insects assemblage animals
Three-spined stickleback. 34″ x 5″ x 13″ H. Body: moped fenders and chain guards. Bones: tablespoons. Gills: car door parts. Fins: cake tins, fish slices, compasses. Tail: motorbike silencer, fish slices. Eyes: flashlights. Head: Solex front fenders.

New Animal and Insect Assemblages Made from Repurposed Objects by Edouard Martinet sculpture insects assemblage animals Moth. 31″ x 16″ x 7″ H. Wings: moped chain guards (rusted and patinated). Abdomen: motorbike headlights. Thorax: very old car headlamp. Legs: large upholstery tacks, car boot hinges, pieces of windshield wipers, bike brake parts, chain guards. Head: old rear position lamps, bike parts, pieces of a daisy wheel. Butterfly trunk: clock springs. Antennae: aluminium heating resistor.

New Animal and Insect Assemblages Made from Repurposed Objects by Edouard Martinet sculpture insects assemblage animals Moth, detail.

New Animal and Insect Assemblages Made from Repurposed Objects by Edouard Martinet sculpture insects assemblage animals
Wasp. 11″ x 6″ x 16″ H. Abdomen: steel tips for boots, bike headlights. Thorax and head: steel tips and bells from bikes and typewriters. Eyes: vintage watch case. Antennae: spectacles arms. Legs: bike brakes, bike chain, spoon handles. Wings: glass.

New Animal and Insect Assemblages Made from Repurposed Objects by Edouard Martinet sculpture insects assemblage animals
Red ant. 25″ x 16″ x 9″ H. Thorax and head: sauce spoons, car parts. Eyes: marbles. Abdomen: bike or motorbike headlights. Antennae: small bike chains. Legs: cream chargers, brake parts, chains, alarm clock feet, spoon handles.

New Animal and Insect Assemblages Made from Repurposed Objects by Edouard Martinet sculpture insects assemblage animals
Dragonfly. 37″ x 49″ x 15″ H. Abdomen: patinated copper/brass bicycle pump, car horn part, parts of old acetylene bike lights (at the ends). Thorax: two motorbike rear lights, shell-shaped drawer handles, big upholstery tacks. Head: car or lorry old stop lights, parts of acetylene bike lights, parts of a daisy wheel for typewriter (hair from the mouth). Legs: tubes, bike cable guide, wing nuts, wire. Wings: umbrella ribs, wire, wire netting for hen coops.

New Animal and Insect Assemblages Made from Repurposed Objects by Edouard Martinet sculpture insects assemblage animals
Dragonfly, detail.

When looking at these perfectly assembled sculptures by French artist Edouard Martinet (previously) it’s difficult to believe the raw materials he used ever existed in another form. Yet every head, thorax, leg, wing, and eye from these assorted creatures was once part of a car, bicycle, typewriter, or other found object. Reading through his material lists it becomes clear how completely thorough and judicious Martinet is in selecting the perfect objects to realize his vision, truly a master of his craft. Via Sladmore Contemporary:

His degree of virtuosity is unique: he does not solder or weld parts. His sculptures are screwed together. This gives his forms an extra level of visual richness – but not in a way that merely conveys the dry precision of, say, a watchmaker. There is an X-Factor here, a graceful wit, a re-imagining of the obvious in which a beautifully finished object glows not with perfection, but with character, with new life. Martinet takes about a month to make a sculpture and will often work on two or three pieces at the same time. It took him just four weeks to make his first sculpture and 17 years for his most recent completion!

If you want to see these new pieces up close, Martinet opens a new exhibition at Sladmore Contemporary in London, November 27 through January 31, 2014. You can see several additional new works on his website.

Xu Bing Arrives at Mass MoCA With His 12-Ton Birds Made of Construction Equipment

Xu Bing Arrives at Mass MoCA With His 12 Ton Birds Made of Construction Equipment sculpture light construction birds assemblage

Xu Bing Arrives at Mass MoCA With His 12 Ton Birds Made of Construction Equipment sculpture light construction birds assemblage

Xu Bing Arrives at Mass MoCA With His 12 Ton Birds Made of Construction Equipment sculpture light construction birds assemblage

Xu Bing Arrives at Mass MoCA With His 12 Ton Birds Made of Construction Equipment sculpture light construction birds assemblage

Xu Bing Arrives at Mass MoCA With His 12 Ton Birds Made of Construction Equipment sculpture light construction birds assemblage

Xu Bing Arrives at Mass MoCA With His 12 Ton Birds Made of Construction Equipment sculpture light construction birds assemblage

Xu Bing Arrives at Mass MoCA With His 12 Ton Birds Made of Construction Equipment sculpture light construction birds assemblage

Xu Bing Arrives at Mass MoCA With His 12 Ton Birds Made of Construction Equipment sculpture light construction birds assemblage

Xu Bing Arrives at Mass MoCA With His 12 Ton Birds Made of Construction Equipment sculpture light construction birds assemblage

Xu Bing Arrives at Mass MoCA With His 12 Ton Birds Made of Construction Equipment sculpture light construction birds assemblage

Xu Bing Arrives at Mass MoCA With His 12 Ton Birds Made of Construction Equipment sculpture light construction birds assemblage

Chinese artist Xu Bing has several works currently on view as part of an exhibition at Mass MoCA in Massachusetts. Among the works are two 12-ton birds titled Phoenix that fill the museum’s football field-sized Building 5. Two years in the making, the birds were constructed from materials collected at various Chinese construction sites including demolition debris, steel beams, tools, and assorted remnants of migrant laborers. The male Phoenix titled Feng measures 90 feet long, and the female, Huang, is nearly 100 feet in length from beak to its steel tail feathers. Both birds are illuminated from within through a network of lights.

Somewhat similar to artists Yao Lu and Ai Weiwei, Xu Bing seems to be commenting on China’s rapid commercial development that is drastically altering the physical and cultural landscape within the country. Phoenix will be on view October 27th. (via junk culture, hyperallergic, my modern met)

Steampunk Watch Part Sculptures
by Sue Beatrice

Steampunk Watch Part Sculptures<br /><noscript><img src=

Steampunk Watch Part Sculptures<br /><noscript><img src=

Steampunk Watch Part Sculptures<br /><noscript><img src=

Steampunk Watch Part Sculptures<br /><noscript><img src=

Steampunk Watch Part Sculptures<br /><noscript><img src=

Steampunk Watch Part Sculptures<br /><noscript><img src=

Using the smallest components from repurposed antique pocket watches and other time pieces, New-Jersey based artist Sue Beatrice of All Natural Arts assembles curious sculptures of animals and human figures. Given the nature of watch movements I can’t help but want to see each one of these things spring to life. See much more here. (via my modern met)

New Typewriter Part Birds by Jeremy Mayer

New Typewriter Part Birds by Jeremy Mayer typewriters sculpture birds assemblage

New Typewriter Part Birds by Jeremy Mayer typewriters sculpture birds assemblage

New Typewriter Part Birds by Jeremy Mayer typewriters sculpture birds assemblage

New Typewriter Part Birds by Jeremy Mayer typewriters sculpture birds assemblage

Artist Jeremy Mayer (previously) just completed this beautiful set of swallows using assembled typewriter parts. The pieces required Mayer to find multiple sets of identical parts adding a significant amount of time to sourcing materials, but as a happy accident the artist also discovered his design allowed for the wings to partially retract. If you’re unfamiliar with Mayer’s work it might surprise you to know that he doesn’t use solder or glue (or even objects that haven’t originated from a typewriter), but instead assembles everything using only native parts. You can follow his progress for this and other projects over on Tumblr.

This Anamorphic Portrait by Bernard Pras is Made From an Entire Room of Objects

This Anamorphic Portrait by Bernard Pras is Made From an Entire Room of Objects portraits assemblage anamorphism

This Anamorphic Portrait by Bernard Pras is Made From an Entire Room of Objects portraits assemblage anamorphism

This Anamorphic Portrait by Bernard Pras is Made From an Entire Room of Objects portraits assemblage anamorphism

This Anamorphic Portrait by Bernard Pras is Made From an Entire Room of Objects portraits assemblage anamorphism

French artist Bernard Pras works almost entirely within the realm of assemblage and anamorposis, a visual illusion where a distorted projection—often made from paint or a collection or objects—must be viewed from a specific vantage point to reconstitute the intended image. His latest piece, a portrait of Malian actor Sotigui Kouyaté, is comprised of numerous objects including clothes, paint, wood, rubber, and other objects found or scavenged around the installation site. Only when viewed through the lens of his camera is the image clearly visible. Watch the video above to see everything come together. Pras currently has a solo show at MazelGalerie in Brussels, Belgium and you can see a collection of his work here (flash).

Mechanical Arthropods and Insects Made from Watch Parts and Light Bulbs

Mechanical Arthropods and Insects Made from Watch Parts and Light Bulbs  watches sculpture insects assemblage

Mechanical Arthropods and Insects Made from Watch Parts and Light Bulbs  watches sculpture insects assemblage

Mechanical Arthropods and Insects Made from Watch Parts and Light Bulbs  watches sculpture insects assemblage

Mechanical Arthropods and Insects Made from Watch Parts and Light Bulbs  watches sculpture insects assemblage

Mechanical Arthropods and Insects Made from Watch Parts and Light Bulbs  watches sculpture insects assemblage

Mechanical Arthropods and Insects Made from Watch Parts and Light Bulbs  watches sculpture insects assemblage

Mechanical Arthropods and Insects Made from Watch Parts and Light Bulbs  watches sculpture insects assemblage

Mechanical Arthropods and Insects Made from Watch Parts and Light Bulbs  watches sculpture insects assemblage

Chicago-based jeweler Justin Gershenson-Gates recently grew a bit tired of creating jewelry after a show this summer and while experimenting with some watch part anatomy he decided to try his hand at spider and insect legs. One thing led to another a new series of small sculptural arthropods and insects was born. Justin tells me via email that each piece takes several hours to make and being unable to leave things unfinished he generally makes an entire new creature in one sitting, a monumental feat considering the scorpions can take an entire 12-hour work session as the watch springs, stems, gears and straps are assembled and soldered together (nothing is glued). I love the idea of the tiny light bulb for the spider abdomens.

If you’d like to see these crawly pieces up-close, you can see a few at the Bucktown Holiday Art Show December 8th and 9th, and you can also pick up some of the spiders on Etsy, at least for the moment. Tons more photos on Facebook. (via neatorama)

Page 1 of 212