Tag Archives: assemblage

New Winged Insects Constructed from Video Game and Computer Components 

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Before old circuit boards find their way to the landfill, Portsmouth, UK-based artist Julie Alice Chappell gives them new life as winged insects. Tearing the boards from old computers and video game systems she cuts and sculpts them into crawly creatures that resemble butterflies, dragonflies and even cockroaches. The upcycled bugs are further adorned with other electrical components that form various appendages. Each piece is one-of-a-kind and she sells them through her Etsy shop.

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Edouard Martinet’s Masterfully Sculpted Animals and Insects Made from Bicycle, Car, and Motorcycle Parts 

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Robin. Bronze, one of an edition of 12 copies, 22 x 32 x 18 cm. LEGS: springs , pieces of costume jewellery; BODY: children’s tricycle fender; FEATHERS: hood ornament of a Citroen; WINGS: petrol tank plates of a 50s motorcycle Monet-Goyon, bike chain guards; TAIL: car part, motorcycle decoration; EYES: marbles; HEAD: two seed scoops, ornaments for bike lights; BEAK: autoscope part, bike ornament.

French artist Edouard Martinet assembles faithful interpretations of birds, crustaceans, insects, and other creatures with countless objects from discarded bicycles, cars, and household objects. A bicycle pump forms the abdomen of a dragonfly, windshield wipers serve as the legs of a fly, or the metal logos of a bicycle manufacturer are layered to create the dense scales of a fish. All the more incredible considering Martinet never welds or solders his pieces, but instead uses only screws or fasteners, selecting only the perfect components that “fit” each assemblage like a puzzle. From Sladmore Contemporary:

What sets Martinet’s work apart is the brilliant formal clarity of his sculptures, and their extraordinary elegance of articulation. His degree of virtuosity is unique: he does not solder or weld parts. His sculptures are screwed together. This gives his forms an extra level of visual richness – but not in a way that merely conveys the dry precision of, say, a watchmaker. There is an X-Factor here, a graceful wit, a re-imagining of the obvious in which a beautifully finished object glows not with perfection, but with character, with new life.

Martinet will open a new exhibition of work at Sladmore Contemporary in London starting May 5th, 2016.

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Dragonfly, 115 x 54 x 80 cm. ABDOMEN: bicycle pump; THORAX: four bike rear lights, two small car lights, big upholstery tacks , gas cap, ball furniture casters; HEAD: two old bike headlights, inside round sunglasses, shoe tree parts, parts of a daisy wheel for typewriter (hair from the mouth), under the head parts of acetylene bike lights; LEGS: tubes, bike cable guide, wing nuts, cream chargers; WINGS: umbrella ribs, fencing wire, aluminium metal mesh.

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Dragonfly, detail.

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Fly, 47 x 40 x 27 cm. LEGS : windshield wiper arms, bike brakes, bike chains, small typewriter parts; HEAD: motor vehicle rear light; PROBOSCIS: car hood hinge; ANTENNAE: ski boot fasteners; THORAX: motorbike headlight; On the top : 50’s kitchen utensil. WINGS: the glass is set in a windscreen brush holder, the wing ribs are made with soldering wire; ABDOMEN: motorbike headlight, part of ceiling lamp.

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Fly, detail.

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Sardine, 25 x 70 x 11 cm. BODY: Moped chain guard covered with multiple bicycle logo badges; HEAD: Solex front fenders, car bumpers. EYES: Flashlights; GILLS: Car door parts, bicycle chain guards. TAIL: Motorbike exhaust pipe; FINS: Cake tins.

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Sardine, detail.

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Black Swift, 45 x 20 x 17 cm. LEGS: springs, pieces of costume jewellery; BODY: silver sauce jug; WINGS and FEATHERS: petrol tank plates of a 50s Villier motorcycle, bike chain guards, scooter decoration; TAIL: car decoration; EYES: metal balls; HEAD: one seed scoop, bike headlight; BEAK: dental forceps.

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Black Swift, detail.

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Praying Mantis, 104 x 50 x 74 cm. ABDOMEN: bike fender, car ventilator and ski boots fasteners; WINGS: rear lights of a Peugeot 404; HEAD: two moped indicators; TOP FORELEGS: car mirror handles, ham slicers, nutcracker handles, spaghetti tongs; FOR ALL THE LEGS: the ends are parts from bike brakes plus a bit of bike chain; THE OTHER LEGS: windshield wiper arms, aluminium tubes; THORAX: car bumper, car mirror handles.

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Artist Duo ‘Expanded Eye’ Explore Human Consciousness Through Painted Repurposed Wood Assemblages 

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Courtesy Vertical Gallery

We’ve long been enamored by the tattoo artistry of Jade Tomlinson and Kev James of Expanded Eye who examine a collision of human conciousness, geometry and the natural world in their refreshingly original artworks. The duo has also begun producing three dimensional pieces in the form of sculptures and painted assemblages built from repurposed wood. The cut fragments serve as a canvas or become fully articulated parts of faces or limbs adorned with pieces of windows, doors and books, all found on the street.

As with their tattoo work, Jade and Kev work side by side to develop new concepts in a process that begins with sketching and gradually moves into 3D. “The aesthetic however is an exciting process of unconscious evolution, as the pieces grow and take shape by immersing ourselves in our studio full of reclaimed wood and found objects,” they share with Colossal. “Using [the] same visual language and symbols to depict stories and concepts but with skin comes limitations, as opposed to working with wood and large scale, you have boundless artistic freedom. Different mediums allow for different explorations.”

Expanded Eye just premiered several new sculptures and a print at Vertical Gallery in Chicago as part of their three year anniversary show with Jana & JS, and STATIC on view through the end of April. They also built several large-scale installations for the adhocPAD project space in Vienna. You can follow more of their work on Instagram and Facebook.

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Courtesy Vertical Gallery

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Courtesy Vertical Gallery

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Courtesy Vertical Gallery

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Courtesy Expanded Eye

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Courtesy adhocPAD

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Courtesy adhocPAD

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Courtesy adhocPAD

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Winged Insects Built from Repurposed Computer Circuit Boards and Video Game Systems 

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Portsmouth, UK-based artist Julie Alice Chappell works with components salvaged from old computers and video game systems to make an entire taxonomic order of circuit-based insects. From used Nintendos to DVD players, any device is fair game for her winged assemblages which she sells online via Etsy. You can read a bit more about their origins on My Modern Met. (via Permaculture)

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Steampunk Animal and Insect Sculptures by Igor Verniy 

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From heaps of scrap metal, old bike chains, and silverware, sculptor Igor Verniy creates birds, butterflies, and other unusual creations. Many of his steampunk and cyberpunk sculptures are made to be fully articulated, with dozens of moving or adjustable parts enabling each piece to be posed in several lifelike positions. These are some of my favorite pieces but you can see more over on his VK and Facebook pages.

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In the Greenhouse: A Towering Figure Enclosed Within a Glass Greenhouse by Susanne Ussing 

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Susanne Ussing, I Drivhuset, Ordrupgaard Samlingen, 1980. Image Courtesy Carsten Hoff.

Artist Susanne Ussing (1940–1998) was a Danish visual artist and architect who worked in a variety of different mediums from photography and ceramics to large-scale installations and sensory exhibitions. One of her most impactful pieces was this 1980 installation titled I Drivhuset (In the Greenhouse) that was installed at the Ordrupgaard Museum in Copenhagen. The sculpture depicts a female figure who has seemingly grown too large for (or has become trapped by) a very tall glass greenhouse. Constructed from newspaper clippings, wood, and metal chimney vents, the figure is so large that her feet seem to penetrate the brick floor below. If Colossal had a physical manifestation, I imagine it would look almost exactly like this.

A retrospective of Ussing’s work titled “an Exhibition in the Midstream between Dream and Prosaic Reality” opened today at the Den Frie in Denmark. Image courtesy Carsten Hoff. (via Carnival of Dogs)

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