assemblage

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Art

Bordalo II Opens the Doors to ‘Attero,’ a Giant Exhibition of Animal Assemblages Built with Trash

November 17, 2017

Christopher Jobson

Within the confines of an abandoned warehouse in Lisbon, artist Bordalo II just opened the doors to his largest body of work to date, dozens of animalistic assemblages comprised of his trademark medium: trash. Using locally-sourced waste plastics, car parts, construction materials, and other found detritus, Bordalo has become famous for his uncanny depictions of animals—those most vulnerable to the side effects of our disposable economy. While scale often plays a large role in his outdoor wall-mounted street pieces, the artist also created considerably smaller assemblages attached to old doors, siding, and windowpanes.

“Whether on a large or small scale, his unusual sculptural creations oblige us to question and rethink our own role as actors in this static, consumerist and self-destructive society, which exploits, often in an abusive way, the resources that nature offers us,” shares Attero curator Lara Seixo Rodrigues.

With well over 8,000 visitors in its first week, Attero (Latin for waste) opened on November 4, 2017 and runs through November 26. You can see many more photos on Facebook and Instagram.

 

 



Art Craft

A Tree-Like Figure Composed of Natural and Technological Elements by Garret Kane

October 27, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

The newest sculpture by assemblage artist Garret Kane (previously) combines moss, tree branches, and other natural elements with technological components to create a towering 7-foot-tall sculpture. The tree-like figure is Kane’s amalgamation of two protectors from vastly different cultural backgrounds. The first is the ancient Judaic Golem made from mud and sticks, and the second inspiration is the Japanese Mecha, a large protector composed of advanced robotics.

Kane combined elements from both traditions to create the Golemecha, a creature with powers tied to nature and advanced technologies. Using materials from tree roots to 3D printed parts, he built the complex model as a figure who would protect our natural world from the new technologies that threaten its existence. You can see more of Kane’s fantastical assemblages on his website and Behance.

 

 



Art

Explosive Scrap Timber Assemblages by Louise McRae

November 8, 2016

Christopher Jobson

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New Zealand-based artist Louise McRae works with pieces of discarded wood that are hand-split into small fragments and then carefully reassembled into intricate wall sculptures. The pieces often resemble aerial views of sprawling cities or macro views organic growths, accentuated with acrylic paints, foil, or even charring the piece with fire outright. You can see more of McRae’s abstract cubist wall pieces at Seed Gallery and Gallery 33. (via Tu Recepcja)

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Art Craft

Assembled Figurines by Garret Kane Appear to Burst with the Seasons

October 26, 2016

Christopher Jobson

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Assemblage artist Garret Kane just unveiled this new series of figurative sculptures depicting fractured individuals who appear to merge with the seasons. Each piece was first partially designed using digital sculpting software called Zbrush, and then 3D-printed components were affixed to wood, rocks, leaves, and other materials to reach the final forms seen here. You can see more views on his website. (via The Operating System)

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Craft Design

New Winged Insects Constructed from Video Game and Computer Components

June 2, 2016

Christopher Jobson

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Before old circuit boards find their way to the landfill, Portsmouth, UK-based artist Julie Alice Chappell gives them new life as winged insects. Tearing the boards from old computers and video game systems she cuts and sculpts them into crawly creatures that resemble butterflies, dragonflies and even cockroaches. The upcycled bugs are further adorned with other electrical components that form various appendages. Each piece is one-of-a-kind and she sells them through her Etsy shop.

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Art

Edouard Martinet’s Masterfully Sculpted Animals and Insects Made from Bicycle, Car, and Motorcycle Parts

April 25, 2016

Christopher Jobson

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Robin. Bronze, one of an edition of 12 copies, 22 x 32 x 18 cm. LEGS: springs , pieces of costume jewellery; BODY: children’s tricycle fender; FEATHERS: hood ornament of a Citroen; WINGS: petrol tank plates of a 50s motorcycle Monet-Goyon, bike chain guards; TAIL: car part, motorcycle decoration; EYES: marbles; HEAD: two seed scoops, ornaments for bike lights; BEAK: autoscope part, bike ornament.

French artist Edouard Martinet assembles faithful interpretations of birds, crustaceans, insects, and other creatures with countless objects from discarded bicycles, cars, and household objects. A bicycle pump forms the abdomen of a dragonfly, windshield wipers serve as the legs of a fly, or the metal logos of a bicycle manufacturer are layered to create the dense scales of a fish. All the more incredible considering Martinet never welds or solders his pieces, but instead uses only screws or fasteners, selecting only the perfect components that “fit” each assemblage like a puzzle. From Sladmore Contemporary:

What sets Martinet’s work apart is the brilliant formal clarity of his sculptures, and their extraordinary elegance of articulation. His degree of virtuosity is unique: he does not solder or weld parts. His sculptures are screwed together. This gives his forms an extra level of visual richness – but not in a way that merely conveys the dry precision of, say, a watchmaker. There is an X-Factor here, a graceful wit, a re-imagining of the obvious in which a beautifully finished object glows not with perfection, but with character, with new life.

Martinet will open a new exhibition of work at Sladmore Contemporary in London starting May 5th, 2016.

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Dragonfly, 115 x 54 x 80 cm. ABDOMEN: bicycle pump; THORAX: four bike rear lights, two small car lights, big upholstery tacks , gas cap, ball furniture casters; HEAD: two old bike headlights, inside round sunglasses, shoe tree parts, parts of a daisy wheel for typewriter (hair from the mouth), under the head parts of acetylene bike lights; LEGS: tubes, bike cable guide, wing nuts, cream chargers; WINGS: umbrella ribs, fencing wire, aluminium metal mesh.

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Dragonfly, detail.

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Fly, 47 x 40 x 27 cm. LEGS : windshield wiper arms, bike brakes, bike chains, small typewriter parts; HEAD: motor vehicle rear light; PROBOSCIS: car hood hinge; ANTENNAE: ski boot fasteners; THORAX: motorbike headlight; On the top : 50’s kitchen utensil. WINGS: the glass is set in a windscreen brush holder, the wing ribs are made with soldering wire; ABDOMEN: motorbike headlight, part of ceiling lamp.

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Fly, detail.

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Toad

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Sardine, 25 x 70 x 11 cm. BODY: Moped chain guard covered with multiple bicycle logo badges; HEAD: Solex front fenders, car bumpers. EYES: Flashlights; GILLS: Car door parts, bicycle chain guards. TAIL: Motorbike exhaust pipe; FINS: Cake tins.

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Sardine, detail.

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Black Swift, 45 x 20 x 17 cm. LEGS: springs, pieces of costume jewellery; BODY: silver sauce jug; WINGS and FEATHERS: petrol tank plates of a 50s Villier motorcycle, bike chain guards, scooter decoration; TAIL: car decoration; EYES: metal balls; HEAD: one seed scoop, bike headlight; BEAK: dental forceps.

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Black Swift, detail.

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Praying Mantis, 104 x 50 x 74 cm. ABDOMEN: bike fender, car ventilator and ski boots fasteners; WINGS: rear lights of a Peugeot 404; HEAD: two moped indicators; TOP FORELEGS: car mirror handles, ham slicers, nutcracker handles, spaghetti tongs; FOR ALL THE LEGS: the ends are parts from bike brakes plus a bit of bike chain; THE OTHER LEGS: windshield wiper arms, aluminium tubes; THORAX: car bumper, car mirror handles.

 

 



Art

Artist Duo ‘Expanded Eye’ Explore Human Consciousness Through Painted Repurposed Wood Assemblages

April 7, 2016

Christopher Jobson

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Courtesy Vertical Gallery

We’ve long been enamored by the tattoo artistry of Jade Tomlinson and Kev James of Expanded Eye who examine a collision of human conciousness, geometry and the natural world in their refreshingly original artworks. The duo has also begun producing three dimensional pieces in the form of sculptures and painted assemblages built from repurposed wood. The cut fragments serve as a canvas or become fully articulated parts of faces or limbs adorned with pieces of windows, doors and books, all found on the street.

As with their tattoo work, Jade and Kev work side by side to develop new concepts in a process that begins with sketching and gradually moves into 3D. “The aesthetic however is an exciting process of unconscious evolution, as the pieces grow and take shape by immersing ourselves in our studio full of reclaimed wood and found objects,” they share with Colossal. “Using [the] same visual language and symbols to depict stories and concepts but with skin comes limitations, as opposed to working with wood and large scale, you have boundless artistic freedom. Different mediums allow for different explorations.”

Expanded Eye just premiered several new sculptures and a print at Vertical Gallery in Chicago as part of their three year anniversary show with Jana & JS, and STATIC on view through the end of April. They also built several large-scale installations for the adhocPAD project space in Vienna. You can follow more of their work on Instagram and Facebook.

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Courtesy Vertical Gallery

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Courtesy Vertical Gallery

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Courtesy Vertical Gallery

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Courtesy Expanded Eye

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Courtesy adhocPAD

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Courtesy adhocPAD

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Courtesy adhocPAD

 

 

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