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Art

Lines in the Sand: Artist Jim Denevan Turns Beaches into Temporary Geometric Artworks

March 27, 2017

Christopher Jobson

For well over a decade California artist Jim Denevan (previously) has made his mark in the sand, etching elaborate geometric artworks on beaches around the world using little more than a rake or found stick. The pieces last only a few hours, or begin disappearing even as he works, as the tides quickly erase each design leaving only a memory or a photograph. Great Big Story recently visited Denevan and shot this brief profile of the artist as he created a number of pieces.

 

 



Art Photography

Over Two Decades of Charting the Various Movements of Snails by Photographer Daniel Ranalli

January 18, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

“Spiral #9” (1996)

For more than 20 years photographer Daniel Ranalli has been actively collaborating with the ecology of Cape Cod, with one of his most collaborative projects being his Snail Drawing series. The works each contain two images, the first capturing the snails in a simplified pattern of Ranalli’s choosing on the beach, and the second showcasing the ways the snails have decided to move out of this neatly formed configuration. The second image allows the viewer to see the trace of the snail’s movement in the sand, the small bodies slowly scattering away from center.

“The best pieces depend on a certain degree of randomness for their success,” said Ranalli. “I tend to think of the snail pieces as a metaphor for the order we establish in our lives, and how the element of chance enters in to affect the result—regardless of how much we attempt to structure it.”

Some of Ranalli’s work will be exhibited with Laurence Miller Gallery this weekend at Classic Photographs Los Angeles from January 21-22. You can see more of his snail series as well as other gesture-based photography (like his Erased Chalkboard series) on his website. (via La Boite Verte)

“Stone Surrounded” (2014)

“Stick Square” (2013)

“Rock Vein #2” (2013)

“Long Rectangle” (1999)

“Infinity” (2013)

“Diminishing Line” (2013)

“Double Line #2” (2007)

“Cross #2” (2008)

“Circle #2” (2007)

 

 



Art

A Quarter Mile of Reflective Poles Mirror the Changing Tides

January 7, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

Phillip K. Smith III, 1/4 Mile Arc, 2016. Photography by Lance Gerber, courtesy of the artist and Royale Projects

Phillip K. Smith III, 1/4 Mile Arc, 2016. Photography by Lance Gerber, courtesy of the artist and Royale Projects

A quarter mile installation of nearly 250 mirrored posts stood tall on California’s Laguna Beach coast, the work reflecting back the Pacific Ocean’s subtle changes for four days last November. 1/4 Mile Arc is the latest outdoor work by Phillip K Smith III, the Los Angeles born artist who previously built a reflective cabin within Joshua Tree’s expansive desert plains. 1/4 Mile Arc’s 10-foot poles were positioned to specifically mark the curve of the beach just beyond the high tide line, ensuring the work would reflect the waves it faced rather than being swallowed by their force.

The work was commissioned by the Laguna Art Museum for the fourth annual Art & Nature program from the 3rd to 6th of last November. You can watch Smith’s installation against the changing tides in a video by photographer Lance Gerber below. (via Dezeen)

Phillip K. Smith III, 1/4 Mile Arc, 2016. Photography by Lance Gerber, courtesy of the artist and Royale Projects

Phillip K. Smith III, 1/4 Mile Arc, 2016. Photography by Lance Gerber, courtesy of the artist and Royale Projects

Phillip K. Smith III, 1/4 Mile Arc, 2016. Photography by Lance Gerber, courtesy of the artist and Royale Projects

Phillip K. Smith III, 1/4 Mile Arc, 2016. Photography by Lance Gerber, courtesy of the artist and Royale Projects

Phillip K. Smith III, 1/4 Mile Arc, 2016. Photography by Lance Gerber, courtesy of the artist and Royale Projects

Phillip K. Smith III, 1/4 Mile Arc, 2016. Photography by Lance Gerber, courtesy of the artist and Royale Projects

Phillip K. Smith III, 1/4 Mile Arc, 2016. Photography by Eric Stoner, courtesy of Laguna Art Museum

 

 



Art

A Translucent Figurative Sculpture Appears Camouflaged Against the Horizon of Bondi Beach

November 11, 2016

Christopher Jobson

coral-4

Recently on view as part of Sculpture by the Sea in Bondi, this unusual figurative sculpture by artist Alessandra Rossi seems to have captured the imagination of many, becoming one of the most popular pieces of this year’s exhibition. Titled Untitled (coral), Rossi says the piece depicting a solitary young girl in a dress is inspired in part by the phenomenon of coral bleaching, something that occurs in nature when ocean water becomes too warm and coral begins to expel an algae giving it a white appearance. Additionally, the work grapples with modern issues of identity, functioning “as a metaphor for the patination and discoloration of emotion engendered by the digital era.”

The sculpture’s translucent layered appearance changes dramatically when viewed from different angles during the day and at times almost vanishes against the horizon of Bondi beach. You can see more sculptures from Sculpture by the Sea 2016 here.

Alessandra Rossi, Untitled Coral. Sculpture by the Sea, Bondi 2016. Photo by Tony Wakeham.

Alessandra Rossi, Untitled Coral. Sculpture by the Sea, Bondi 2016. Photo by Tony Wakeham.

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Alessandra Rossi, Untitled Coral. Sculpture by the Sea, Bondi 2016. Photo by Clyde Yee.

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Alessandra Rossi, Untitled Coral. Sculpture by the Sea, Bondi 2016. Photo by Grace Sui.

coral-3

Photo by Brian Thomas

 

 



Art

A 10,000 Square Foot Ball Pit Situated Within a National Museum Lets Visitors Experience the Beach Indoors

July 7, 2015

Kate Sierzputowski

All images by Noah Kalina

All images by Noah Kalina

Brooklyn-based experimental studio Snarkitecture is bringing the ocean indoors, transforming water and waves into nearly one million recyclable translucent plastic balls. Covering 10,000 square feet of the National Building Museum in Washington D.C., the interactive installation titled “The BEACH” will include white beach chairs and umbrellas to simulate seaside vibes, while maintaining the monochrome feel that Snarkitecture has become known for.

Snarkitecture primarily works within the space between art and architecture, blending experience and design. The collaborative firm was started by Alex Mustonen and Daniel Arsham and they explain that their focus is “on the viewer’s experience and memory, creating moments of wonder and interaction that allow people to engage directly with their surrounding environment.”

A unique experience is achieved in their latest installation, the museum inviting visitors to wade within the sea of plastic spheres, relax in one of the many chairs at the “shore’s edge,” and grab drinks at the snack bar. You can visit The BEACH through September 7 or visit it virtually with the museum’s live stream.

All included images are by Noah Kalina, more of his work can be seen here. (via designboom)

Photo by Noah Kalina (4)

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snark_02

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snark_03

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Art History Photography

Dreamlike Autochrome Portraits of an Engineer’s Daughter From 1913 Are Among the Earliest Color Photos

April 28, 2015

Kate Sierzputowski

O'Gorman_03

Mervyn O’Gorman (1871-1958) is best known as one of the greatest British engineers, and during WW1 was head of the Royal Aircraft Establishment at Farnborough. O’Gorman was also known as an early pioneer of color photography, and was an artist in addition to his interest aeronautics. Many of his images are included in exhibitions referencing early color photography, including this dreamlike series of his daughter Christina using the Autochrome process in 1913. The Autochrome process, patented in 1903, was the first fully practical single-plate color process that was accessible to the public.

The beach images are from Lulworth Cove, Dorset and feature her in a bright red swimming costume—a color the early process captured well. Christina is also captured in red in every other scene, drawing the eye immediately to the subject and her long strawberry blonde hair. The up-close image of Christina has an oddly modern feel as her clothing is hard to pin to a singular time period. O’Gorman’s wife Florence and second daughter are featured in the last portrait, the photographer’s camera box seen just to the left of his family. (via PetaPixel, Mashable, and National Media Museum)

O'Gormon_08

O'Gorman_01 O'Gorman_02 O'Gormon_04 O'Gorman_05 O'Gormon_06 O'Gormon_07

 

 



Art Photography

Washed Up: Alejandro Duran’s Site-Specific Found Plastic and Trash Installations

April 18, 2015

Christopher Jobson

Derrame

Working along a single stretch of coastline in Sian Ka’an, Mexico’s largest federally-protected reserve, artist Alejandro Duran collects countless bits of trash that washes up from locations around the world. So far he’s discovered plastic debris from dozens of countries on this shore of the Caribbean coast which he utilizes for site site-specific installations for an ongoing project titled Washed Up. By creating aesthetically pleasing landscapes from a disheartening medium, it’s Duran’s hope to create a harsh juxtaposition that draws attention to the global catastrophe of ocean pollution. He shares in a statement about Washed Up:

Over the course of this project, I have identified plastic waste from fifty nations on six continents that have washed ashore along the coast of Sian Ka’an. I have used this international debris to create color-based, site-specific sculptures. Conflating the hand of man and nature, at times I distribute the objects the way the waves would; at other times, the plastic takes on the shape of algae, roots, rivers, or fruit, reflecting the infiltration of plastics into the natural environment.

More than creating a surreal or fantastical landscape, these installations mirror the reality of our current environmental predicament. The resulting photo series depicts a new form of colonization by consumerism, where even undeveloped land is not safe from the far-reaching impact of our disposable culture.

Duran just received the Juror’s Award from CENTER for his efforts, and has upcoming exhibitions at Habana Outpost in Brooklyn and at the XO KI’IN Retreat Center. (via This Isn’t Happiness, LENSCRATCH)

Algas

Amanecer

Cepillos 005

Cocos

2-up

Espuma

Tubos y Palmas 7 001

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Nubes