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Art

Murals of Animals and Insects on the Streets of Antwerp by ‘Dzia’

March 18, 2015

Christopher Jobson

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Although he’s only been painting murals for less than three years, Belgian street artist Dzia has already established a distinctive style and an impressive body of work. The artist most frequently paints depictions of animals and insects in colorful patterns of lines that resemble something like a mosaic. Dzia recently collaborated with artist Gijs Vanee on a series of window pieces at Harmonie Park, and you can follow more his latest work on Instagram. (via My Modern Met)

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Collaboration with Gijs Vanhee

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Collaboration with Gijs Vanhee

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Art History Photography

Photographers Create Meticulously Faithful Dioramas of Iconic Photos

March 17, 2015

Johnny Strategy

Making of “The Wright Brothers” (by John Thomas Daniels, 1903)

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“The Wright Brothers” (by John Thomas Daniels, 1903)

It all started with a joke—a rather ironic challenge, if you will, to recreate the world’s most expensive photograph: Andreas Gursky’s Rhein II. Because for commercial photographers Jojakim Cortis and Adrian Sonderegger, that meant tolling away in their spare time when money wasn’t coming in to recreate a photograph that had just sold for $4.3 million. This was the beginning of Ikonen, an ambitious project to meticulously recreate iconic historical scenes in miniature. The ongoing project includes immediately recognizable shots—the Wright Brothers taking flight, the Lock Ness Monster poking its head out, “Tank Man” halting tanks during the Tiananmen Square protests—because the images have been seared into our collective memory.

“Every field has its icons, guiding stars, which reflect the spirit of time in form, media and content,” says the photographers. And when something is photographed, it has a way of transcending time rather than becoming isolated. Historical symbolism is fluid and our perception of it can change the same way history can. This, perhaps, is why Cortis and Sonderegger pull away from their miniature scene at the very end, revealing what each photograph actually is: paper, cotton balls, plastic and plenty of their own spare time. Photos shared with permission from the artists. (via Wired)

Making of “Nessie” (by Marmaduke Wetherell, 1934)

Making of “Five Soldiers Silhouette at the Battle of Broodseinde” (by Ernest Brooks, 1917)

Making of “Tiananmen” (by Stuart Franklin, 1989)

Making of “AS11-40-5878” (by Edwin Aldrin, 1969)

“AS11-40-5878” (by Edwin Aldrin, 1969)

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Making of “Lakehurst” (by Sam Shere, 1937)

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Making of “The last photo of the Titanic afloat” (by Francis Browne, 1912)

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“The last photo of the Titanic afloat” (by Francis Browne, 1912)

Making of “La cour du dumaine du Gras” (by Joseph Nicéphore Niépce, 1826)

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“La cour du dumaine du Gras” (by Joseph Nicéphore Niépce, 1826)

 

 



Art Design

Shylights: Beautiful Unfolding Kinetic Lights That Bloom like Flowers

March 16, 2015

Christopher Jobson

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Several types of flowers are known to open and close for reasons of defense or energy conservation. This evolutionary mechanism, called nyctinasty, inspired Studio DRIFT to design the Shylight, a kinetic light fixture that opens dramatically during a 30 foot (9 meter) fall. The motion mimics the same action of a blooming flower or the billowing of a parachute. A collection of Shylights were just permanently installed at Rijksmuseum in Amsterdam, and you can see them in action in the video above. (via Prosthetic Knowledge)

 

 



Art Design

Hand-Painted Ceramic Bowls Filled with Detailed Hippos, Foxes and Deer

March 11, 2015

Kate Sierzputowski

Animal Bowls, 2004, Hella Jongerius for Nymphenburg © Nymphenburg

These animal-filled porcelain bowls were meticulously crafted by hand and designed by Hella Jongerius for a commission by Nymphenburg, a Bavarian porcelain manufacture since the mid-18th century. The series was produced as a celebration of the animal collection found in their archives, and incorporates 3D creatures within the simple glazed bowls.

The ceramics display animals that look as if they have been temporarily and calmly placed upon the delicate bowls—curious foxes, birds, and miniature hippos happily plopped into their fragile environments. The displays are also hand painted with floral decorative patterns originally found on Nymphenburg’s cups and saucers, adding subtle detail to the glossed ceramic works. (via Jongeriuslab)

animal_bowls_fox©Nymphenburg

animal_bowls_dog©Nymphenburg

animal_bowls_frog©Nymphenburg

 

 



Food Photography

Fictional Images of the Universe Made From Scanning Household Items and Food by Navid Baraty

March 10, 2015

Johnny Strategy

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Planet – bottom of a glass containing half and half, water, food coloring. Moons – bottom of a glass containing coconut milk, water, food coloring. Stars – salt, cinnamon, baking powder, tums

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Black hole – bottom of a glass of coffee, salt, sugar, corn starch, cinnamon

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Planet – bottom of a glass containing half and half, water, food coloring. Stars – salt, cinnamon, baking powder

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Nebula – makeup, olive oil, chalk, baby powder, salt, water

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Nebula with gas streams – cat fur, garlic powder, salt, flour, cumin, turmeric

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Distant galaxy – olive oil, sesame oil, water, cumin, cinnamon, flour

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Spiral galaxy – baking soda, curry powder, chalk, salt, sugar, cinnamon

Have you ever left the lid of a scanner open to find that the background of your image was rendered black instead of white? That, essentially, was the impetus behind photographer Navid Baraty’s latest project WANDER Space Probe. Using an Epson photo scanner, Baraty carefully positions various household items, many of which are edible, on the document table.

Cooking ingredients like baking soda, sugar and cinnamon act as distant stars and nebulas while glasses containing milk, water and food coloring create the planets. Once everything is aligned properly Baraty hits the scan button. The photographer describes his project as “Cosmic explorations of an imaginary space probe.” You can follow Baraty’s fictional space probe and its adventures into depths of the unknown on Facebook and Instagram. (via My Modern Met)

 

 



Design

Vertical Forest: An Urban Treehouse That Protect Residents from Air and Noise Pollution

March 10, 2015

Kate Sierzputowski

© Beppe Giardino

© Beppe Giardino

A potted forest of trees and branching steel beams disguise this 5-story apartment building in Turin, Italy. Designed by Luciano Pia, 25 Verde brings plants up off the ground in an attempt to evade Turin’s homogeneous urban scene and integrate life into the facade of the residential building.

The undulating structure creates a transition from outdoors to in, holding 150 trees that absorb close to 200,000 liters of carbon dioxide an hour. This natural absorption brings pollution protection to its residents, helping to eliminate harmful gasses caused by cars and harsh sounds from the bustling streets outside. The trees’ seasonal progression also creates the ideal microclimate inside the building, steadying temperature extremes during the cold and warmer months. The plants’ full foliage block rays of sun during the summer while letting in warm light during the winter.

The building holds 63 units, each benefiting from the terraces and vegetation just beyond their windows and walls. Each species of plant has been chosen purposefully from deciduous plant life in Turin to provide the highest variety of color, foliage, and blooming. This innovative design provides a childlike dream while also instilling real world benefits to those who live in this urban treehouse. (via Divisare)

© Beppe Giardino

© Beppe Giardino

© Luciano Pia

© Luciano Pia

© Beppe Giardino

© Beppe Giardino

© Beppe Giardino

© Beppe Giardino

© Beppe Giardino

© Beppe Giardino

© Beppe Giardino

© Beppe Giardino

© Beppe Giardino

© Beppe Giardino

 

 



Illustration

3D Illustrations Incorporating Everyday Objects by Victor Nunez

March 6, 2015

Christopher Jobson

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Illustrator Victor Nunes is seemingly obsessed with creating illustrations from common objects like pencil caps, pieces of popcorn, hair brushes, and rubberbands. He has, literally, thousands of these posted in no particular order on his Facebook page. (via I Need a Guide, Laughing Squid, Boing Boing)

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