Tag Archives: birds

Birds Appear in the Negative Space of Shattered Windowpanes in a New Intervention from Pejac 


All photos by Sasha Bogojev

Barcelona-based artist Pejac (previously) was recently in Rijeka, Croatia where he completed a number of new artworks as part of a residency with the Museum of Modern and Contemporary Art. His most impressive new intervention appeared in the windows of an abandoned power plant where the artist utilized the cracked glass in old windows to form a flock of birds escaping the aim of a boy in silhouette holding a slingshot. Titled Camouflage, Pejac says the work is in tribute to artist René Magritte who famously depicted birds in many of his paintings as silhouettes filled with clouds. You can see more of his work in Croatia on Arrested Motion.






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A Spectacular Close-Up View of a Fiery-Throated Hummingbird 



Photographer Jess Findlay recently captured this amazing shot of a fiery-throated hummingbird while shooting in the Talamanca Mountains in Costa Rica. The image is a result of hundreds of photos taken over several hours with a telephoto lens as he waited patiently for one of the small birds to perch at just the right angle. Findlay shares with Colossal:

Several of these hummingbirds were visiting a nectar feeder. As they fed hungrily, often quarreling with one another, occasionally one would get displaced onto a nearby branch. I waited by the branch for a couple hours, staying very still. I used a telephoto lens with a special attachment that allowed me to focus on close subjects. What made this a challenge was how fidgety these birds can be and the fact that the full spectrum of colour is only seen when they pause at a very specific angle.

Findlay is a native of Vancouver where he’s extremely active in the photography community, offering a wide variety of workshops. You can see more of his work on Instagram.

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Face of a Hummingbird Resembles a Baby Octopus 

As part of a fascinating courting behavior, this Costa’s hummingbird flares the feathers around its face to create a poof of iridescent pink that bears an uncanny resemblance to the shape of a cartoonish baby octopus. The near complete lack of interest from the female bird in this video is almost comical, there’s a metaphor here. (via Geyser of Awesome)


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New Detailed Colored Pencil Drawings of Entangled Flora and Fauna by Marco Mazzoni 


Marco Mazzoni (previously here and here) creates works that at first lead the viewer astray, appearing as bouquets or nests until one notices fins protruding from the flora that sprawls across his Moleskine sketchbooks. Some works concentrate on small groups of animals while others serve as finely drawn “I Spy” collages, as he incorporates camouflaged toads and birds into lush, textured gardens.

Colored pencil is the Italian artist’s medium of choice, cool pastels of purple, blue and pink forming most of his paused still lifes. Recently Mazzoni produced a series titled “Illustrated Encyclopedia of Mental Diseases,” illustrations which were included in the group exhibition “Cluster” at Jonathan LeVine Gallery in New York City this August. You can view more of the artist’s odd animal clusters on his Instagram, Facebook, and Tumblr.








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Giant Starling Mural in Berlin by Collin van der Sluijs and Super A 

Netherlands-based artists Super A (previously) and Collin van der Sluijs (previously) teamed up earlier this year to paint this phenomenal mural titled Starling on the side of a residential building in Berlin. The 137-foot-tall mural piece depicts a large bird whose ornate chest is comprised of a dense patchwork of glistening jewels and plants. Starling was created at the invitation of Urban Nation as part of the One Wall Mural Project. All photos by Nika Kramer. (via StreetArtNews, BerlijnBlog.nl, Urban Nation)






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Unusual Composite Images of Birds in Flight Inspired by an 150-Year-Old Technique 


All images via Xavi Bou

Interested in how the human eye perceives birds in flight, Spanish photographer Xavi Bou sought to examine this motion in a way that avoided the blur that comes with creating an image with a long exposure. To do this, he turned to chronophotography, an 150-year-old technique that combines many photographs taken in succession to imitate movement. Unlike this pre-cinema strategy however, Bou uses the power of Photoshop to bring all of his images together into one, making each bird appear like an elongated corkscrew softly floating through the sky. When shooting more than one bird, the image turns into a chaotic configuration, appearing much more like a hurricane than a group of migratory birds.

Bou describes his project Ornitographies as a balance between art and science, relating the works to visual poetry. You can see more images from the project on his website, and take a look at how two other artists documented the motion of birds in flight here and here. (via FastCo Design)

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