Tag Archives: black and white

Sunburn: Long Exposure Photographs With Markings Burned by the Light of the Sun 

Sunburned GSP#552( Mojave/ expanding), 2012. 8″x10″ unique gelatin silver paper negative. Private collection.

Photographer Chris McCaw uses the power of the sun to burn markings into his photographs, destroying small areas to appear like the sun itself. McCaw stumbled upon the technique for his series Sunburn after forgetting to close the shutter during an all night exposure. The light of the morning sun destroyed his efforts from the night before, reversing the tonality of the work in a way that has inspired McCaw to continue to experiment with injuring the surface of the photograph.

“The subject of the photograph (the sun) has transcended the idea that a photograph is simple a representation of reality, and has physically come through the lens and put it’s hand onto the final piece,” said McCaw in an explanation of the series. “This is a process of creation and destruction, all happening within the the camera.”

The resulting image from McCaw’s technique shows the landscapes he photographs with a burnt hole or streak where the sun appeared overhead. Often McCaw will combine several works to showcase the sun’s movement—charred dots or a thick line marking its arched path.

Currently McCaw’s Sunburn series is included in his solo exhibition Times and Tides at San Francisco-based Haines Gallery. You can view more images from his Sunburn series on his website. (via Juxtapoz)

Sunburned GSP#202 (SF Bay/expanding), 2008. 16″x20″ unique gelatin silver paper negative. Collection of the Santa Barbara Museum of Art. All images via Chris McCaw.

Sunburned GSP#839 (Every 30 minutes, Arctic Circle, Alaska), 2015. Four 4”x10” unique gelatin silver paper negatives. Private collection

Sunburned GSP#288 (Pacific Ocean), 2008. 11″x14″ unique gelatin silver paper negative. Private collection

Sunburned GSP #676( San Francisco Bay), 2013. 8″x10″ unique gelatin silver paper negative.

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Hazy Black Watercolor Paintings of Children with Animals 

Indonesia-based watercolor artist Elicia Edijanto (previously here and here) depicts loving relationships between wildlife and children set against atmospheric backdrops painted in black watercolor. “My subject are often children and animal because they are honest, sincere, unprejudiced and unpretentious,” shares Edijanto. “They give me so much inspiration for [a] particular mood or atmosphere, such as tranquility, solemnity, and also wilderness and freedom, which I put on my paintings.” Seen here are a number of recent paintings from the last year or so, some of which are available as prints and originals via her website. You can follow her works in progress on Instagram.

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Fun Black and White Murals of Friends and Family by Alex Senna 

It’s not often that you walk down the street and encounter an artwork that warms your heart or brings a smile to your face, but for Brazilian street artist and muralist Alex Senna, positive emotion seems to be his visual currency. His lanky black and white characters are often found in a variety of hopeful, loving, and positive scenes from a pair of lovers embracing to a family riding a bicycle. To intensify their emotional depth Senna often gives the flat characters broad shadows that stretch out larger-than-life across urban walls. You can check out more of Senna’s work on Instagram.

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Bottled Finnish Landscapes Captured With Double-Exposure Photography by Christoffer Relander 

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Stemming from a past of ambitious collecting, photographer Christoffer Relander utilizes mason jars as vessels to capture the environments that surrounded him during his childhood in Finland. The project, Jarred & Displaced, utilizes double exposures shot on medium format film to combine pristine images of jars with black and white landscapes, collecting scenes shot within forests, neighborhoods, and on top of steep ridges. Each of the images is completely analog as Relander decided to eschew all digital processes for the series.

“With analog multiple exposures I’m able to manipulate my photographs in-camera,” said Relander to Colossal, “this project was not created or manipulated in an external software such as Photoshop.”

The wooded landscapes captured in his photographs are mostly from the countryside in the south of Finland, an environment Relander missed and wished to revisit as an adult. You can see a behind-the-scenes look at Relander exploring these scenes in a short film directed by Anders Lönnfeldt below. (via PetaPixel)

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Ominous Storms Photographed in Black and White by Mitch Dobrowner 

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Regan, North Dakota, 2011

Photographer Mitch Dobrowner travels the U.S. and sets up his camera in front of apocalyptic storms that rise above rural fields in Oklahoma, Kansas, and North Dakota. Inspired by photographers like Minor White and Ansel Adams, he captures breathtaking landscapes that remind us of nature’s raw power by juxtaposing the endless flat plains of the southern and midwest states with dramatic weather formations. Lightning strikes and tornadoes feature heavily in Dobrowner’s black and white images that at times look like moments right out of the first few minutes of the Wizard of Oz.

Dobrowner has exhibited in galleries across the U.S. and internationally since 2005 and is represented by Photo-Eye Gallery in Santa Fe and Kopeikin Gallery in LA. You can see much more of his work on Facebook. (thnx, Laura!)

Peckham, Oklahoma

Peckham, Oklahoma

Peckham, Oklahoma

Peckham, Oklahoma

Bolton, Kansas

Bolton, Kansas

Syracuse, Kansas

Syracuse, Kansas

Newkirk, Oklahoma

Newkirk, Oklahoma

Syracuse, Kansas

Syracuse, Kansas

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Arcus Cloud

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Vortex Over Field, 2015

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Strata Storm and Bales, 2015

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The Rescued Film Project Acquires Trove of 1,200 Undeveloped Rolls of 1950s Era Film 

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The Rescued Film Project recently made a huge discovery: nearly 66 bundles of film dating from the 1950s. Meticulously labeled and wrapped inside cigar boxes and athletic tape, the treasure trove of photography from a man known only as Paul seems to encompass at least 1,200 undeveloped rolls of film. It’s unclear what would drive a person would take tens of thousands of photographs without any intent to develop the images, but it’s easy to make at least a symbolic comparison to Vivian Maier. A preliminary attempt to develop a roll revealed candid family snapshots of children at home on Christmas while unwrapping presents and playing outside in the snow.

Over the last few years the Rescued Film Project has developed no less than 18,000 images that might have otherwise been lost to time, including an ambitious endeavor to save 31 rolls shot during WWII mentioned here last year. The project is partnering with Blue Moon Camera in Portland to develop the rest of Paul’s film, and the hope is to raise a modest amount of money through donations to help cover costs. You can learn more over on IndieGogo.

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