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Art

New 360-Degree Immersive Drawing Created With 120 Marker Pens by Oscar Oiwa

April 11, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

For his latest immersive installation, Oscar Oiwa (previously) created a 360-degree black and white drawing that fills the space of an inflatable vinyl balloon. The work, Oscar Oiwa in Paradise – Drawing the Ephemeral, took Oiwa and his five assistants two weeks and 120 marker pens to create. Visitors are invited to enter the encapsulating drawing to fully experience Oiwa’s imagined environment, which is composed of dark patches of forest, winding pathways, and a sky filled with high-contrast swirls.

“I’ve always enjoyed drawing, which I consider the most basic way of expressing myself visually,” said Oiwa in a press release regarding the large-scale work. “A pencil and a blank sheet— there is no simpler medium than that.”

The exhibition is presented at JAPAN HOUSE São Paulo, a venue that showcases traditional Japanese culture through a modern lens. Drawing the Ephemeral runs through June 3, 2018. You can watch the making of the massive drawing in the short video below.

 

 

 



Animation

The Mesmerizing Animation of Sinusoidal Waves in GIFs by Étienne Jacob

April 9, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

24-year-old French student Étienne Jacob produces black and white GIFs that transform the curvature found in sinusoidal waves into a multitude of experimental forms. The animated spheres imitate the appearance of mutating microbes or fiery stars, yet tend to remain in a 2D plane. Jacob recently experimented with programming his GIFs to appear more 3D, like in the work below which features a black sphere fighting to keep its position in a strong current.

Jacob has published all of his animations to his Tumblr, Necessary Disorder since January 2017, and provides tutorials for how to create these GIFs on his blog. You can view more of the applied mathematics student’s work on his Twitter.

 

 



Illustration

Stippled Black and White Illustrations of Star-Packed Galaxies by Petra Kostova

February 27, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

Copenhagen-based graphic designer and illustrator Petra Kostova of Pet & Dot creates dazzling galaxies composed of millions of stippled dots. To produce her concentrated star systems and cloudy nebulas she uses technical pens (either rOtring Rapidograph or Isograph) to draw on black and white paper. Due to the limitations of her color scheme, each work is completely formed through the intensity of her chosen dots—a meditative process which can often take her several weeks or months to complete.

Kostova also produces handmade prints created by a technique called Photogravure, which accurately reproduces her stippled detail. You can find these, and her original drawings, on her website and Instagram.

 

 



Art Design

Black and White Figural Tattoos With a Macabre Twist by Korean Tattoo Artist Oozy

February 5, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

South Korean tattoo artist Woojin Choi, or Oozy, creates detailed black and white works which often incorporate a macabre twist. His fine line tattoos explore scenes that are not as innocent as they first appear, such as a geisha who partially hides her own skeleton behind a decorative fan, and a figure who is being lifted from (or dropped into) a bowl of Chashu ramen.

Oozy’s pieces are often very line-oriented, an effect that resonates with the appearance of classic woodblock prints. The tattoo artist also associates this aesthetic with his background in animation, a subject he is currently majoring in at school. You can see more of the South Korea-based artist’s work on his Instagram.

 

 



Art

New Large-Scale Graphite Drawings of Idealized American Figures by Ethan Murrow

January 26, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

Ethan Murrow (previously) creates large-scale graphite drawings of fictionalized heroes set against the deserted landscape of the American Southwest. His work presents these figures in confusing and illogical acts, a critique that addresses America’s habit of manipulating key moments from historical events.

“Through a mash-up of images,” said Murrow in an artist statement, “I hope to cut away at the neat and tidy narrative of progress and domination and create moments that deal with the abundant misinformation, deep confusion, genuine absurdity and billowing mass that has always kept this country on its toes.”

Murrow currently teaches at the School of the Museum of Fine Arts Boston at Tufts University. He has an upcoming solo exhibition of his monumental drawings at the Currier Museum of Art in the fall of this year. You can see more of his graphite works on his Instagram and website.

 

 



Photography Science

Breathe: A Stunning Black & White Timelapse of Thunderstorms Across the Central Plains

January 11, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

Phoenix-based filmmaker, photographer, and storm chaser Mike Olbinski captures approaching storms around his desert home using high definition video, often posting his works to his Vimeo in 4K. Breathe, one of his latest short films, is the first ever work posted in 8K and features a selection of storms shot in 2017 in either the American central plains or southwest. Watch the video above in high resolution to witness the magnificence of each rolling stormcell gather and disperse throughout a variety of open landscapes.

You can follow along with Olbinski’s storm chasing adventures on his blog, and see more of his timelapse videos and photography on his website.

 

 



History Photography

A Norwegian University Student Used a Spy Camera in This Amazing Example of 19th Century Street Photography

January 2, 2018

Christopher Jobson

All images courtesy the Norwegian Folk Museum.

Fredrik Carl Mülertz Størmer is known mostly as an accomplished mathematician and physicist from Norway, but as a side hobby he was also an amateur photographer, taking to the streets of Oslo with a bulky camera secreted in his clothing to capture candid moments of unsuspecting passersby. Most of his photos were taken in the 1890s while Størmer was a 19-year-old student at the Royal Frederick University using a Stirn Concealed Vest Spy Camera, a secretive camera with a narrow lens designed to poke through a vest pocket’s buttonhole.

Størmer’s photography stands in stark contrast to portraiture of the era that consisted mainly of staid and unsmiling images against decorative backdrops. Here we see a rare view of people going about their daily lives nearly 125 years ago, often smiling and perhaps caught off guard from the young student angling for the shot. To see more of Størmer’s work head over to Norwegian Folkmuseum. (via Bored Panda)