Tag Archives: black and white

The Rescued Film Project Acquires Trove of 1,200 Undeveloped Rolls of 1950s Era Film 

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The Rescued Film Project recently made a huge discovery: nearly 66 bundles of film dating from the 1950s. Meticulously labeled and wrapped inside cigar boxes and athletic tape, the treasure trove of photography from a man known only as Paul seems to encompass at least 1,200 undeveloped rolls of film. It’s unclear what would drive a person would take tens of thousands of photographs without any intent to develop the images, but it’s easy to make at least a symbolic comparison to Vivian Maier. A preliminary attempt to develop a roll revealed candid family snapshots of children at home on Christmas while unwrapping presents and playing outside in the snow.

Over the last few years the Rescued Film Project has developed no less than 18,000 images that might have otherwise been lost to time, including an ambitious endeavor to save 31 rolls shot during WWII mentioned here last year. The project is partnering with Blue Moon Camera in Portland to develop the rest of Paul’s film, and the hope is to raise a modest amount of money through donations to help cover costs. You can learn more over on IndieGogo.

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Artist Bill Domonkos Remixes Archival Footage and Photos into Surreal Animations 

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Photo by Fitz W. Guerin from The Library of Congress. Animation by Bill Domonkos.

Working with photographs, film clips, and illustrations lost to time, San Francisco-based filmmaker and stereoscopist Bill Domonkos creates darkly humorous animated GIFs. The resurrected photos merged with modern animation are almost completely nonsensical in subject matter and yet perfect in their execution, the more random the better. From his artist statement:

I experiment by combining, altering, editing and reassembling using digital technology, special effects and animation to create a new kind of experience. I am interested in the poetics of time and space—to renew and transform materials, experiences and ideas. The extraordinary thing about cinema is its ability to suggest the ineffable—it is this elusive, dreamlike quality that informs my work.

These brief animations capture the filmmakers wit and aesthetic, but he uses many of the same techniques for much longer films, many of which have been shown in galleris and festivals around the world. You can explore more of Domonkos’ work on Tumblr and on Ello.

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Archive film footage from the Internet Archive’s 35mm stock footage collection. Animation by Bill Domonkos.

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Photo: Costică Acsinte. Stock footage from Videvo. Animation by Bill Domonkos.

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Archive Film Footage from the Prelinger Archives. Animation by Bill Domonkos.

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(Image: Robert Thornton’s Temple of Flora) (Circular Wave Anim by SoylentGreen)

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Image from page 96 of Our domestic animals, their habits, intelligence and usefulness (1907). Animation by Bill Domonkos.

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Photo: c1909. Animation by Bill Domonkos.

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A 360-Degree Black and White Drawing of a Japanese Landscape Inside an Inflatable Dome by Oscar Oiwa 

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All images courtesy of Oscar Oiwa

Housed within an 40-foot inflatable dome inside of a former soy sauce factory, Oscar Oiwa‘s Oiwa Island 2 is an immersive drawings that takes up the entirety of the circular space. The drawing is a part of the 2016 Setouchi Triennale which opened March 20, 2016, a massive art festival that takes over 12 islands and includes 68 works by artists, architects, and designers. Oiwa’s own is located on the island of Shodoshima, an island with 78 miles of coastline in Japan’s Kagawa Prefecture.

The 360-degree drawing includes natural imagery, placing visitors in a black and white world with a detailed forest containing a cabin on the shore of a beach. The drawing is fairly realistic until one reaches the water, where the patterns of the waves become increasingly abstract. The door of the cabin in this elaborate mural doubles as the actual door for the dome, creating an even more immersive effect when you enter the gigantic space.

Oiwa Island 2 will be open for viewing through April 17th for its spring dates, from July 18 through September 4th for the summer, and October 8th through November 6th for the fall. (via Spoon & Tamago)

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On the Other Side of the Woods: A Stop-Motion Story About a Small Clay Girl Lost in an Artist’s Studio 

Created in 2014 by Estonian animator Anu-Laura Tuttelberg, On the Other Side of the Woods is a beatfully realized stop-motion fairy tale about a small clay girl lost in a creaky painter’s studio. The film was shot mostly with natural light streaming in from nearby windows causing a gentle flicker that helps subtly denote the passage of time. Tuttelberg tells us that it was her intent to express as much about each character as possible through the materials she used.

The materials for puppets were chosen to express their characteristics. The girl for example is made of moist clay to express her dynamic and free personality. She is always flowing along with any event that she comes across in life. I used real clay for making her, and asked the animator to move the surface of her body in every frame so that it is visible that she is made of soft wet clay. The technique was quite time consuming as the clay deforms easily while animating and I had to make a new puppet for each shot.

On the Other Side of the Woods won numerous festival awards over the last year and was made available online for the first time this morning. Watch the film above and you can see some behind-the-scenes shots here.

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This Microscopic View of a Spider Embryo is Strangely Adorable 

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Spider embryo. Molecular characterization and embryonic origin of the eyes in the common house spider Parasteatoda tepidariorum. Göttingen University.

Taken from recent research into the development of eyes in spiders, this microscopic image shows what a common house spider looks like as it develops inside an egg. For some reason, it’s disturbingly… cute? This little cthulhu-like spider embryo is nearing the final stage before hatching and appears to be stuck in a tiny self hug. You can learn more about the embryonic origin of eyes in common house spider over on BioMed Central. (via Reddit, Göttingen University)

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Photographer Nicolas Bouvier Shoots Figures in Silhouette Against Mysterious and Foreboding Landscapes 

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In what could easily have been snapshots of a normal day at the beach or a hike through the woods, these photos by Nicolas Bouvier (previously) portray figures exploring the Pacific Northwest in stark, mysterious contrast. The French art director and concept designer is a master of teasing unusual scenes from breathtaking landscapes around the coast of Washington. By placing himself in foggy atmospheres and shooting against the sun, his photography turns passersby (and often images of his own children) into anonymous silhouettes. Instead of lugging around lots of equipment, Bouvier carries only a smaller and relatively inexpensive point-and-shoot Panasonic ZS40 or a Leica XVario, preferring ergonomy, simplicity, and design over more elaborate setups. You can explore more of his recent work on Flickr.

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