Tag Archives: black and white

A 360-Degree Black and White Drawing of a Japanese Landscape Inside an Inflatable Dome by Oscar Oiwa 

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All images courtesy of Oscar Oiwa

Housed within an 40-foot inflatable dome inside of a former soy sauce factory, Oscar Oiwa‘s Oiwa Island 2 is an immersive drawings that takes up the entirety of the circular space. The drawing is a part of the 2016 Setouchi Triennale which opened March 20, 2016, a massive art festival that takes over 12 islands and includes 68 works by artists, architects, and designers. Oiwa’s own is located on the island of Shodoshima, an island with 78 miles of coastline in Japan’s Kagawa Prefecture.

The 360-degree drawing includes natural imagery, placing visitors in a black and white world with a detailed forest containing a cabin on the shore of a beach. The drawing is fairly realistic until one reaches the water, where the patterns of the waves become increasingly abstract. The door of the cabin in this elaborate mural doubles as the actual door for the dome, creating an even more immersive effect when you enter the gigantic space.

Oiwa Island 2 will be open for viewing through April 17th for its spring dates, from July 18 through September 4th for the summer, and October 8th through November 6th for the fall. (via Spoon & Tamago)

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On the Other Side of the Woods: A Stop-Motion Story About a Small Clay Girl Lost in an Artist’s Studio 

Created in 2014 by Estonian animator Anu-Laura Tuttelberg, On the Other Side of the Woods is a beatfully realized stop-motion fairy tale about a small clay girl lost in a creaky painter’s studio. The film was shot mostly with natural light streaming in from nearby windows causing a gentle flicker that helps subtly denote the passage of time. Tuttelberg tells us that it was her intent to express as much about each character as possible through the materials she used.

The materials for puppets were chosen to express their characteristics. The girl for example is made of moist clay to express her dynamic and free personality. She is always flowing along with any event that she comes across in life. I used real clay for making her, and asked the animator to move the surface of her body in every frame so that it is visible that she is made of soft wet clay. The technique was quite time consuming as the clay deforms easily while animating and I had to make a new puppet for each shot.

On the Other Side of the Woods won numerous festival awards over the last year and was made available online for the first time this morning. Watch the film above and you can see some behind-the-scenes shots here.

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This Microscopic View of a Spider Embryo is Strangely Adorable 

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Spider embryo. Molecular characterization and embryonic origin of the eyes in the common house spider Parasteatoda tepidariorum. Göttingen University.

Taken from recent research into the development of eyes in spiders, this microscopic image shows what a common house spider looks like as it develops inside an egg. For some reason, it’s disturbingly… cute? This little cthulhu-like spider embryo is nearing the final stage before hatching and appears to be stuck in a tiny self hug. You can learn more about the embryonic origin of eyes in common house spider over on BioMed Central. (via Reddit, Göttingen University)

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Photographer Nicolas Bouvier Shoots Figures in Silhouette Against Mysterious and Foreboding Landscapes 

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In what could easily have been snapshots of a normal day at the beach or a hike through the woods, these photos by Nicolas Bouvier (previously) portray figures exploring the Pacific Northwest in stark, mysterious contrast. The French art director and concept designer is a master of teasing unusual scenes from breathtaking landscapes around the coast of Washington. By placing himself in foggy atmospheres and shooting against the sun, his photography turns passersby (and often images of his own children) into anonymous silhouettes. Instead of lugging around lots of equipment, Bouvier carries only a smaller and relatively inexpensive point-and-shoot Panasonic ZS40 or a Leica XVario, preferring ergonomy, simplicity, and design over more elaborate setups. You can explore more of his recent work on Flickr.

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X-Ray Photographs From the 1930s Expose the Delicate Details of Roses and Lilies 

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“Lotus,” ca. 1930, vintage gelatin silver print, 11 1/4 x 9 1/4 inches. All imagery courtesy Joseph Bellows Gallery.

When selecting flowers we are often first attracted to their vibrant colors, eager to choose a bright orange lily or deep red rose. Dr. Dain L. Tasker, an early 20th century radiologist, was attracted to a different feature of the blooms—their anatomy. Using X-ray film to highlight the soft layering of petals and leaves, Tasker produced ghostly images devoid of color, each image appearing more like an ink drawing than photograph.

Born in 1872 in Beloit, Wisconsin, Tasker was the chief radiologist at the Wilshire Hospital in Los Angeles when radiology was in its first stages of exploration. He first became interested in photography in the 20s, focusing his hobby on landscape and portraiture. It wasn’t until the the 30s that he began to connect his career and hobby, moving his photographic interests to the X-ray machine and singling out flowers from his previously photographed landscape environments.

By composing images with singular flowers Taker examined their individualistic qualities rather than focusing on how they might be found grouped in nature or a bouquet. These minimal compositions contain a romantic appreciation for his subject matter. “Flowers are the expression of the love life of plants,” he said in a statement.

A selection of Tasker’s X-ray images can be seen in the exhibition “Floral Studies” at Joseph Bellows Gallery in La Jolla, California which runs through February 19, 2016. (via Hyperallergic)

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“A Rose,” 1936, vintage gelatin silver print, 11 1/4 x 9 1/8 inches

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“Yellow Calla Lily,” 1938, vintage gelatin silver print, 11 3/8 x 9 1/4 inches

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“untitled, (lily),” 1932, vintage gelatin silver print, 11 1/4 x 9 inches

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“Philodendron,” 1938, vintage gelatin silver print, 11 3/8 x 9 inches

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“Peruvian Daffodil,” 1938, vintage gelatin silver print, 11 1/2 x 9 1/4 inches

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“Fuchsia,” 1938, vintage gelatin silver print, 9 1/2 x 7 1/4 inches

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“Delphinium,” 1938, vintage gelatin silver print, 11 1/4 x 9 1/8 inches

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“Tulip,” 1931, vintage gelatin silver print, 9 x 7 inches

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“California Holly,” 1937, vintage gelatin silver print, 11 3/8 x 9 1/8 inches

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The Black and White Anthropomorphic Illustrations of David Álvarez 

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All images courtesy of David Álvarez. This image was made in collaboration with Julia D

David Álvarez produces soft illustrations that seem to glow despite their often limited color palette of black and white. The graphite scenes depict animals either interacting with or as humans, often donning elaborate garments while engaged in activities such as dancing or reading books.

“I always found it amazing how artists worked in the earlier days, I think of the technological limitations and how it took talent, skill, and patience to develop works of great complexity,” Álvarez told Colossal. “That was one reason why, since I was a student, I felt interest in figurative drawing for handling light and shadow. At school I discovered graphite and its possibilities. When I started working on my own I noticed that my personality and my way of working suited that particular technique.”

Mesoamerica is one of the illustrator’s favorite subjects to produce works around. Recently he created a book surrounding Mesoamerican myth titled Ancient Night that follows a rabbit and opossum’s adventures with pulque, a fermented prehispanic beverage.

Seen here are a number of collaborations with illustrator Julia Diaz. You can explore more of Álvarez’s illustrations on his Instagram and blog.

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David Álvarez in collaboration with Julia D

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