black and white

Posts tagged
with black and white



Art Design

Black and White Figural Tattoos With a Macabre Twist by Korean Tattoo Artist Oozy

February 5, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

South Korean tattoo artist Woojin Choi, or Oozy, creates detailed black and white works which often incorporate a macabre twist. His fine line tattoos explore scenes that are not as innocent as they first appear, such as a geisha who partially hides her own skeleton behind a decorative fan, and a figure who is being lifted from (or dropped into) a bowl of Chashu ramen.

Oozy’s pieces are often very line-oriented, an effect that resonates with the appearance of classic woodblock prints. The tattoo artist also associates this aesthetic with his background in animation, a subject he is currently majoring in at school. You can see more of the South Korea-based artist’s work on his Instagram.

 

 



Art

New Large-Scale Graphite Drawings of Idealized American Figures by Ethan Murrow

January 26, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

Ethan Murrow (previously) creates large-scale graphite drawings of fictionalized heroes set against the deserted landscape of the American Southwest. His work presents these figures in confusing and illogical acts, a critique that addresses America’s habit of manipulating key moments from historical events.

“Through a mash-up of images,” said Murrow in an artist statement, “I hope to cut away at the neat and tidy narrative of progress and domination and create moments that deal with the abundant misinformation, deep confusion, genuine absurdity and billowing mass that has always kept this country on its toes.”

Murrow currently teaches at the School of the Museum of Fine Arts Boston at Tufts University. He has an upcoming solo exhibition of his monumental drawings at the Currier Museum of Art in the fall of this year. You can see more of his graphite works on his Instagram and website.

 

 



Photography Science

Breathe: A Stunning Black & White Timelapse of Thunderstorms Across the Central Plains

January 11, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

Phoenix-based filmmaker, photographer, and storm chaser Mike Olbinski captures approaching storms around his desert home using high definition video, often posting his works to his Vimeo in 4K. Breathe, one of his latest short films, is the first ever work posted in 8K and features a selection of storms shot in 2017 in either the American central plains or southwest. Watch the video above in high resolution to witness the magnificence of each rolling stormcell gather and disperse throughout a variety of open landscapes.

You can follow along with Olbinski’s storm chasing adventures on his blog, and see more of his timelapse videos and photography on his website.

 

 



History Photography

A Norwegian University Student Used a Spy Camera in This Amazing Example of 19th Century Street Photography

January 2, 2018

Christopher Jobson

All images courtesy the Norwegian Folk Museum.

Fredrik Carl Mülertz Størmer is known mostly as an accomplished mathematician and physicist from Norway, but as a side hobby he was also an amateur photographer, taking to the streets of Oslo with a bulky camera secreted in his clothing to capture candid moments of unsuspecting passersby. Most of his photos were taken in the 1890s while Størmer was a 19-year-old student at the Royal Frederick University using a Stirn Concealed Vest Spy Camera, a secretive camera with a narrow lens designed to poke through a vest pocket’s buttonhole.

Størmer’s photography stands in stark contrast to portraiture of the era that consisted mainly of staid and unsmiling images against decorative backdrops. Here we see a rare view of people going about their daily lives nearly 125 years ago, often smiling and perhaps caught off guard from the young student angling for the shot. To see more of Størmer’s work head over to Norwegian Folkmuseum. (via Bored Panda)

 

 



Art Photography

‘The Art of Flying’ Captures the Shape-Shifting Wonder of a Murmuration of Starlings

November 30, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

A murmuration is the intricately choreographed movements of a large flock of starlings as they swoop through the sky. The phenomena appears like an undulating cloud, quickly shifting directions, density and shape as it traverses overhead. Due to a relatively warm winter in the Netherlands between 2014 and 2015, many starlings stayed in the country rather than migrating south. Filmmaker Jan van IJken captured one such air show in his short film The Art of Flying, which can be watched in full on his website. Watch the condensed version above to observe the fluidity of the birds’ movements, as well as listen to the soothing sound of the flock’s flapping wings. (via Laughing Squid)

 

 



Art Photography

Artist Yang Yongliang Imagines the Bleak Effects of Industrialization in Dense Photographic Collages

November 1, 2017

Christopher Jobson

Yang Yongliang, Endless Streams, 2017. Single Channel 4K video, 7’00”, © Yang Yongliang / Courtesy Galerie Paris-Beijing

In these stark photographic collages that seem to possess the infinite density of a fractal, artist Yang Yongliang (previously) questions unchecked industrialization, the impact of climate change, and pressing social issues in his native China. Each image seems to suggest a post-apocalyptic future where the forces of urbanization collide with the natural world, creating a drab black and white dystopia. “The artist keeps developing a critic approach to reality while searching for a spiritual source in his country’s relentless march between technological progress and annihilation,” states Galerie Paris-Beijing.

As part of this new series titled Time Immemorial, Yongliang began with a series of digital collages that were printed in negative on fine art paper. Each piece was then photographed with a traditional film camera and prints were developed by hand. Lastly, the artworks are mounted on back-lit wooden cases to fulfill the artist’s intent to preserve digital imagery on photographic film.

Time Immemorial opens at Galerie Paris-Beijing on November 4, 2017.

Sinking, 2016. Giclee print on Fine Art paper, 100 x 80 cm

Flooding, 2016. Giclee print on Fine Art paper, 80 x 100 cm

The Cliff, 2016. Giclee print on Fine Art paper, 80 x 80 cm

The Path, 2016. Giclee print on Fine Art paper, 80 x 80 cm

The Streams, 2016. Giclee print on Fine Art paper, 100 x 80 cm

The Flock, 2016. Giclee print on Fine Art paper, 80 x 100 cm

 

 



Design Photography

Spaceships: Abstract Photographs of European Architecture Portrayed as Spacecraft by Lars Stieger

July 31, 2017

Christopher Jobson

Hamburg-based photographer Lars Stieger travels around Europe to photograph architectural structures, but instead of capturing a building in its entirety he opts to isolate only the most unusual aspects, recasting each as a figment of science fiction. For his new series titled Spaceships he pushes this concept to the extreme by applying an otherwordly color scheme that places these real-life buildings onto alien worlds or sends them hurtling through space. You can see more from the series on Behance.