Posts tagged
with body


Textile Bodies Reveal Branched Systems of Veins, Flowers and Roots by Raija Jokinen

February 26, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

Finnish artist Raija Jokinen creates sculptural bodies out of flax which attempt to reveal the complicated relationship between the mind and body. Webs of flowers, veins, and roots cover her textile torsos, shape-shifting between plant and human forms. Jokinen invites the audience to get lost in these visual similarities, as she makes no distinction between whether the pieces are actually nerves or sprouting tree branches.

“It is fascinating how body-related details, such as skin, blood vessels, and nerve tracks resemble the forms of roots or branches, as well as many other organic things,” Jokinen told Colossal. “I am excited in their apparent similarity, infinite variation, and how these visual allegories can be found almost everywhere. These forms are optimal for the life-support functions, and maybe also for our mind.”

Jokinen compares her sculptural practice to painting, using handmade flax rather than paint. An upcoming solo exhibition of her fibrous sculptures opens March 14 at Galleria Uusi Kipinä and runs through April 8. You can see more of her body-based works on her website.




Paper-Cast Sculptures of Legs and Torsos Covered in Traditional Chinese Paintings by Peng Wei

January 10, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

Beijing-based artist Peng Wei places traditional Chinese painting on rice paper to create contemporary sculptures of human legs, shoes, and torsos. These paper-cast works display scenes of the natural and domestic, including lush gardens, animals, and interiors of Chinese homes. Peng has been troubled by the adoption of Western styles of clothing by Chinese women. By painting classical Chinese motifs on Western shoes and other fashion-related items, Peng aims to deny the decline of China’s cultural heritage to rapid globalization.

Peg was born in Chengdu in 1974 and graduated from the Eastern art department of Nankai University with a BA in Literature and an MA in Philosophy. Her works have been collected by the National Art Museum of China, the Hong Kong Museum of Art, the Asian Art Museum of San Francisco, the Guangdong Art Museum, and many more international collections. You can see more of Peng’s paintings and sculptures on Artsy. (via Lustik)



Art Photography

Landscapes Formed From Human Bodies by Carl Warner

July 30, 2013

Christopher Jobson


Shin Knee Valley


Valley of the Reclining Woman


The Desert of Sleeping Men


Desert of Backs


Shoulder Hill Valley


Headless Horizon

In this series of photographs by Carl Warner, human bodies have been contorted, lit, and manipulated to form expansive landscapes reminiscent of barren deserts and mountains. The London-based photographer who might be best known for his Foodscapes, says that he shoots all of the forms in his studio to focus attention on “one person’s body, creating a sense of place so that a body that is lived in becomes a place to live.” The images are then digitally pieced together using Photoshop. If you liked this also check out the work of Arno Rafael Minkkinen and of course Spencer Tunick (nsfw). (via PetaPixel)




Geometric Paper Torso with Removable Organs

January 13, 2012

Christopher Jobson

Australian architect and paper artist Horst Kiechle recently constructed this geometric paper torso complete with modular organs including lungs, intestines, kidneys, pancreas, stomach and more. The piece was made for the Science Lab of the International School Nadi, Fiji. You should also check out some of his archisculptures. (via my modern met)




Self-Portrait Diagrams by Minjeong An

January 11, 2012

Christopher Jobson

(click images for detail)

Unfortunately I know very little about Korean artist Minjeong An (her website is currently down), but these are just a few of her incredibly complex self-portraits illustrated using some kind of information visualization. My guess is she’s using a mix of actual data, or a perceived translation of sensory input along with simply beautiful drawings. You can see a bit more on Prosthetic Knowledge and 50 Watts.




Figurative Sand Sculptures by Carl Jara

January 3, 2012

Christopher Jobson

Call me old fashioned, but when I think of a sand castle competitions my mind is filled with images of giant structures adorned with mermaids, pirates, and sand dollars, enormous boat-devouring sharks, and faithful replicas of Mount Rushmore or the Leaning Tower of Pisa. How pleasantly surprised I was to find these striking figurative sculptural works by Cleveland-based sand sculptor and woodworker Carl Jara, who says his intention is to sculpt things with sand you would never expect to see at a sand castle competition. His work is so accomplished you almost forget the medium you’re looking at, the pieces appearing as if carved from marble or wood.

Jara began working with sand in high school when a desperate art teacher, afraid Carl’s insatiable hunger for art might lead him to re-take the available art classes a third time, connected him with sand sculptor Tom Morrison. Once in college he studied fine arts, mainly illustration and graphic design, but when it came time for his degree show at Meyers School of Art in Akron, he realized he possessed neither the desire nor talent to become a designer, and decided to focus his efforts on a 15-foot sand sculpture. The response was overwhelming and landed Jara on the evening news and served as the formal launching point of his career that now includes nine World Championship medals. You can see much more of his work here.




Speedy PVC Pipe Sculptures

December 7, 2011

Christopher Jobson

These whimsical sculptures by Korean artist Kang Duck-Bong are made by adhering myriad cuts of PVC pipe and covering them in a thick shellac of urethane paint. The process creates an uncanny sense of motion, the figures appearing blurred and perpetually in motion. Kang’s work is on display at Gallery 4Walls in Seoul through December 23 as part of his solo show, Disguise. A huge thanks to Cho at Gallery 4Walls for providing the imagery for this post.