bones

Posts tagged
with bones



Art

Brittle Skeletons Crocheted from Discarded Textiles by Caitlin McCormack

October 31, 2017

Laura Staugaitis

Philadelphia-based artist Caitlin McCormack (previously) continues to explore the decay and remains of once-living things in her intricate crochet work. McCormick constructs her pieces using a labor intensive process that involves stiffening discarded textile materials with enamel paint to create brittle bone-like material. She then crochets fantastical intertwined skeletons of humans, birds, snakes, devils, and two-headed bats, which are displayed with stark black backdrops, glass cases, and lathed bases that reference old-fashioned displays for scientific specimens.

Her new show, Lazarus Taxa, refers to the paleontological concept of species that disappear and reappear in the fossil record. Lazarus Taxa is currently on display at Paradigm Gallery + Studio. You can also follow her on Instagram.

 

 



Art Music

An Antique Piano Cut in Half, Connected Only by a Wishbone

June 28, 2016

Christopher Jobson

wish-1

We’ve long marveled at artist Maskull Lasserre's masterful ability to carve anatomical details into everyday objects. One of his recent sculptures, titled Improbable Worlds, is no exception. For this piece the Canadian artist split an old upright piano in two, slicing through every last component leaving only a single point of connection: a tiny wishbone carved from the wooden piano back. The visual tension created by the piece is astounding, let alone the head-scratching question of how he technically accomplished it, knowing that if the weight of the piano shifted just slightly the piece would snap in half.

You can see more of Lasserre’s recent artworks in his portfolio.

wish-2

wish-3

wish-6

wish-5

wish-7

wish-4

wish-last

 

 



Art

Human Skeletons Assembled with Found Coral by Gregory Halili

June 16, 2016

Christopher Jobson

coral-1

With parched white pieces of found sea coral, artist Gregory Halili has been creating skeletal parts of the human anatomy from hands and arms all the way up to a lifesize recreation of a human skeleton suspended atop a giant piece of driftwood. The irregular coral segments are uncanny stand-ins for human bones, and it’s no surprise the artist is able to identify anatomical details within sea life due to his previous work with skulls carved from mother of pearl. Halili was born in the Philippines in 1975 and spent his childhood surrounded by tropical wildlife and abundant regional flora and fauna that would go on to influence his artistic career in New Jersey. You can see more of his recent work on Artsy and at Nancy Hoffman Gallery.

coral-2

coral-3

coral-4

coral-5

coral-6

coral-7

final

coral-8

 

 



Craft Design

Miniature DIY Paper Skeleton Kits by Tinysaur

January 26, 2016

Christopher Jobson

dino-1

The folks over at Brooklyn-based Tinysaurs build DIY paper model kits of the world’s smallest dinosaurs and other skeletons, both real and fictional. Each tiny kit stands about 2 inches tall when finished and takes about 20-30 minutes to assemble with a pair of tweezers. Kits are available as a standalone paper model, or as a deluxe kit with included borosilicate glass display dome. See more in their Etsy shop. (via So Super Awesome)

dino-2

dino-3

dino-6

dino-4

dino-5

 

 



Art Craft

Decaying Animal Skeletons Crocheted From String by Artist Caitlin McCormack

July 17, 2015

Kate Sierzputowski

c-orexis

Caitlin McCormack creates crocheted animals that appear to decay in front of your eyes, delicate corpses crafted from cotton string and glue. To produce each of her sculptures she must stiffen the string which produces a consistency similar to the bone tissue of the animals she is recreating. These fragile remains appear extremely macabre, a typically cute hobby made somewhat morbid.

Documented on dark backgrounds, the details of her creations are all the more apparent, string dangling from bits of the animals’s arms and wings as if it was truly decomposing. By using a technique inherited from her deceased relatives McCormack says she “aim[s] to generate emblems of my diminishing bloodline, embodied by each organism’s skeletal remains.”

McCormack studied Illustration at the University of Fine Arts in Philadelphia, PA. Her work will be featured within Opus Hypnagogia: Sacred Spaces of the Visionary and Vernacular at The Morbid Anatomy Museum in Brooklyn, New York which runs through October 15th. (via Laughing Squid and Beautiful Decay)

World Before the World, 2014

World Before the World, 2014

World Before the World II, 2014

World Before the World II, 2014

Bound, As It Were, 2015

Bound, As It Were, 2015

Mothering, 2015

Mothering, 2015

Ghost, 2014

Ghost, 2014

Crawlspace, 2014

Crawlspace, 2014

The Organist, 2013

The Organist, 2013

 

 



Art

A Giant Twisting Serpent Skeleton Emerges from the Loire River in France

January 2, 2014

Christopher Jobson

ESTUAIRE 2012 ©Gino Maccarinelli

Kamel Mennour, photo by Gino Maccarinelli

snake4

via Flickr

Completed in 2012, Serpent d’océan is a giant aluminum sea serpent skeleton by artist Huang Yong Ping (previously) situated off the shore of the Loire River where it empties into the Bay of Biscay just outside of Nantes, France. Measuring nearly 425 feet (130 meters) in length the curving skeleton mirrors the curves of the nearby Saint-Nazaire bridge and was created as a permanent work for the final Estuaire contemporary art exhibition in 2012. Via Nantes Tourisme:

By having a major figure from Chinese mythology appear on European shores, Huang Yong Ping examines, the notions of identity and cultural hybridity, as is often the case in his work. The environmental question is also very present in his art where he regularly exposes the paradox of the man sawing the branch he is sitting on, torn between creative abilities and destructive impulses. This is one of the many possible interpretations of this work: placed on the beach, the skeleton appears with the tide and, little by little, will be home to marine fauna and flora.

Depending on weather conditions, tide levels, or the perspective of a photographer, Serpent d’océan appears dramatically different from day to day, a phenomenon you can witness over on Flickr. (via Beautiful Decay)

 

 



Art Photography

Evolution: A Stunning Monochromatic Exploration of Vertebrate Skeletons by Patrick Gries

November 20, 2013

Christopher Jobson

Horse and rider

Horse and Rider © Patrick Gries

Opah

Opah © Patrick Gries

Cheetah

Cheetah © Patrick Gries

African Elephant

African Elephant © Patrick Gries

gries-5

Rattlesnake © Patrick Gries

gries-6

Mandrill & Humbolt’s Wooly Monkey © Patrick Gries

Orca

Orca © Patrick Gries

gries-8

Lemur © Patrick Gries

gries-9

Flamingo & Water Monitor © Patrick Gries

gries-11

© Xavier Barral

gries-12

© Xavier Barral

Created in collaboration with the National Museum of Natural History in Paris, Evolution is an extraodinary collection of images by photographer Patrick Gries that tells the visual story of evolution through 300 black and white photos of vertebrate skeletons. Unlike a textbook approach to photography, the skeletons Gries’ photos appear to have been reanimated, artfully posed and lit in lifelike scenarios resulting in images that are both beautiful and haunting.

In addition to the National Museum of Natural History in Paris, Gries acquired anatomical specimens from numerous veterinary and natural history museums throughout France and Monaco to round out the series of photos that are accompanied by passages from writer and scientist Dr. Jean-Baptiste de Panafieu. Evolution is available through Editions Xavier Barral.

All images courtesy Patrick Gries. (via Photojojo)

 

 

A Colossal

Highlight

Advanced Yoga Joes