Tag Archives: Brazil

Light Appears to Drip from Trees in these Long-Exposure Photos by Vitor Schietti


For his series of experimental photography titled Impermanent Sculptures, photographer Vitor Schietti worked with fireworks and long-exposure photography to illuminate the branches and stems of trees in his native Brazil. The photos are a mixture of in-camera light painting, and a bit of post-processing that can combine up to 12 shots into a final image. He shares with us about the project:

The series is the result of several years of research on long exposure photography, and the usage of ND filters was vital to find a perfect balance between the fading twilight and the brightness of the fireworks. Only a few attempts were allowed per day, since the time frame during which this balance is possible is very narrow (30 to 50 minutes). The Brazilian central plateau, in a kind of savanna called “Cerrado” was the scenery for most of these experimentations. The margins of the lake Paranoa, the streets and some iconic monuments from Brasilia were also locations for some of the light paintings. It’s important to say the series is an ongoing process, and more will follow in the coming year or so.

You can see much more of Schietti’s photography on Flickr. (via This Isn’t Happiness)






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Bird Portraits Painted On Secondhand Books Featuring Their Native Brazilian Habitats Carved from the Pages



Guy Laramée‘s (previously) new series Onde Elles Moran (Where They Live) captures the mystique of the native birds of the Brazilian region Serra do Corvo Branco (Range of the White Raven) through both portrait and carved landscape. The series contains nine sculptures sourced from secondhand bookstores within the country—tomes of the Classicos Jackson which is a series of literature classics published in the ‘50s in Brazil. The rich linen covers inspired the palettes of many of the portraits, the original colors working their way into Laramée’s artistic remodeling.

Although Laramée had originally planned to photograph the vast canyons of the region during his 4-month visit, the diversity, songs, and liveliness of the native birds kept persuading him to eclipse the beautiful scenes with their portraits. The series is dedicated to these birds and their habitat, each book containing a portrait of one on the cover against a faded background and an environmental carving into the pages of the book on the opposite side. The size ratio of the bird to corresponding landscape highlights the creatures’ importance, acknowledging their role as the true owners and rulers of the region.

“Being in the company of these lively beings were one thing, painting them was another story,” explained Laramée while discussing his process. “They became like ghosts on a theater backdrop, posing in front of wallpaper, looking at a vanishing scenery.”

Laramée hopes that this series exudes the stark differences between Man and bird, recognizing that we do not live within the same world. Man’s world has been transformed into an object from which we now feel alienated he explains—we live within our heads and books, not the canyons or earth. “Maybe where they live is where we should live,” says Laramée. “In the solitude of virgin landscapes, we might rediscover our intimate relationships to the world.”

Laramée is represented by JHB Gallery in New York City.














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A Fearless Hummingbird Visits a Man in His Kitchen

This is a wonderful slice of life video featuring a man named João Silvestrini from Barretos, Brazil who is visited daily by hummingbirds… in his kitchen. It’s fun enough to see him feeding the bird from his finger, but the kicker is what happens when it flies back outside. (via Twisted Sifter)

Residents of Rio de Janeiro Take to the Rooftops to Battle with Kites

For many of us, the idea of flying a kite involves stopping by a convenience store to purchase an inexpensive plastic kite emblazoned with a movie character, and heading over to the local park to launch it into the sky where it’s promptly swallowed by a tree. But for residents living in the crowded favelas of Rio de Janeiro, where resources and park space is scarce, flying kites is do or die. People of all ages take to the rooftops to fight with homemade kites using strings coated with wax and powdered glass in an attempt to cut the strings of competitors. Entire battles are fought between neighboring “turfs,” where real life conflicts between people and neighborhoods are settled through kite wars.

Filmmaker Guilherme Tensol, in collaboration with sports magazine Victory and Brazilian production company Mosquito Project, produced this stylized documentary short titled Kite Fight for the New York Times leading up to the World Cup a few weeks ago.




Os Gemeos Paint a Mural on a Boeing 737 with 1,200 Cans of Spray Paint for Brazil’s World Cup Team

Junior Lago/UOL

Brazilian graffiti artists Os Gemeos recently partnered up with GOL Airlines to paint this gargantuan mural on the fuselage of a Boeing 737 that will be used to carry Brazil’s team during the World Cup. The duo used some 1,200 cans of spray paint to depict a crowd of fans in their signature vibrant yellow which coincidentally is the same color used by the Brazilian team. Completed in only a week, the plane first flew today and will remain in use for at least another two years after use by the team. See many more photos over on Arrested Motion.

Junior Lago/UOL

Junior Lago/UOL

Junior Lago/UOL


Junior Lago/UOL

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Crawling Art on the Streets of São Paulo by Tec





Over the last two years or so artist Tec has taken to the streets of São Paulo, literally, to paint several large-scale works of crawling animals and people. You can see several more of the giant pieces that run almost the length of a city blocks over on Flickr. If you liked this also check out the work of Roadsworth. (via Wooster Collective, This Isn’t Happiness)

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Urban Vertical Garden Built From Hundreds of Recycled Soda Bottles









As part of an innovative partnership called Home Sweet Home (Lar Doce Lar) between multidisciplinary design firm Rosenbaum and TV producer Luciano Huck, the teams went through dozens of Brazilian homes doing dramatic makeovers of interior and exterior spaces. On their 48th home Rosenbaum designed a pretty amazing vertical garden that was suspended in a narrow walkway just outside the house. Response to the garden was so huge the firm quickly released design schematics (in Portuguese) detailing how to build one. A huge thanks to the team at Rosenbaum for sharing these photos with Colossal!

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