Tag Archives: buildings

A “Quick Perspective” on the Scale of the Manmade and Natural Marvels That Surround Us 

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If the Willis Tower (1,729 ft) was placed into Russia’s Mir Mine, the tip would only stick out 7 feet past ground level. (All images via Kevin Wisbeth)

College student Kevin Wisbeth, creator of the Youtube series “A Quick Perspective,” puts size in layman’s terms for those who might not be able to conceptualize the true width of a B-2 Bomber’s wings, or understand the immense depth of Russia’s largest mine. Wisbeth digitally composes manmade structures and natural wonders to put into context each of their sizes, seamlessly fitting the world’s largest oil tanker into New York’s Central Park and hovering the M-1 Rocket motor just above a Smart Car.

You can watch the digital presentations of Wisbeth’s comparisons on his Youtube channel. (via Quipsologies)

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If the Seawise Giant (1,504 ft), the largest oil tanker ever produced, was placed into the main lake in New York City’s Central Park, it would only have 350 feet of extra room in the front and back of the tanker.

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The Burj Khalifa is currently the tallest standing structure in the world (almost measuring 2,722 feet tall). If placed in New York City, it would stretch almost 1,000 feet past the One World Trade center and almost 1,300 feet taller than the Empire State Building.

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If the Titanic (882 ft) was placed on the deck of the U.S.S. Ronald Reagan, the ship would have 210 feet of deck room left.

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The B-2 Bomber is one of the worlds most advanced and most expensive airplanes in the world. The wingspan of a B-2 is 172 feet, which is 12 feet wider than an NFL football field.

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Prehistoric bugs were larger than average day bugs due to the higher oxygen levels. The Pulmonoscorpius kirktonensis was a species of scorpion that grew to 24 inches long, or the size of a normal house cat.

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The M-1 Rocket motor was designed back in the 1950s for the NASA space program and would have been the biggest motor ever built had it been constructed. It’s designed diameter was 14 feet, or wide enough to fully cover a Smart Car with 2 feet to spare on either side.

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The Death Star’s estimated width is around 99 miles across, or around 1/4th the length of Florida.

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Photos of Hong Kong Construction Sites Wrapped in Colorful Cocoons by Peter Steinhauer 

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Like a burst of color on an otherwise grey canvas, a single majestically colored building rises out of a sea of dull grayness. This is not Christo’s latest “wrapping” project, which is what the photographer Peter Steinhaur first thought, naturally, upon encountering the phenomenon. In fact, these are construction sites wrapped in a colorful mesh material, a traditional method employed in Hong Kong to prevent debris from falling onto the streets below. According to Steinhauer, who’s lived and worked in Asia for the last 21 years – but was stunned to discover this unique construction method in Hong Kong – buildings are wrapped regardless of whether they’re coming up or going down. I’ve seen a similar method employed in Japan with smaller houses, but never anything of such monolithic scale. You can see many more photos over on Steinhauer’s site, where he has two series aptly titled “Cocoon.” (via Featureshoot)

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Incredible Time-lapse Capturing Exterior Painting of Sprawling Russian Industrial Plant 

Moscow-based filmmaker Sasha Aleksandrov captured this dramatic exterior paint job of what appears to be a cold-war era industrial plant. Aleksandrov shot everything by hand over a period of two months without the use of a steadicam or camera track slider&em;meaning he would move the camera and tripod every few feet, capture some footage, repeat 50 times, then used software to stabilize the final shots. The film takes what must have been a grueling physical process involving countless workers and makes it look almost fun.

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Seung Hoon Park’s Woven Photography 


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New works from South Korean photographer Seung Hoon Park as part of his ongoing series TEXTUS. Park uses a process to overlay or weave together film strips, however this appears to be a single print, so I’m unsure of how he’s making these. My assumption is that it’s not digital, but I could be wrong. Anybody venture a guess of how these are made? See more of his work at Sarah Lee Artworks (via ex-chamber)

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