Tag Archives: butterflies

Large New Embroidered Textile Moths and Cicadas by Yumi Okita 

These oversized moths and insects by Yumi Okita (previously) are constructed with fabric, embroidery thread, fake fur, wire, and feathers. The Raleigh-based artist makes each piece by hand, creating faithful interpretations of actual insects like the Oleander Hawk Moth or the Peacock Butterfly. You can see many of her most recent creations on Etsy.

See related posts on Colossal about , , , .

Flora and Fauna Paper Constructions by Ann Wood and Dean Lucker 

Artist duo Ann Wood and Dean Lucker (aka Woodlucker) forged a partnership in 1987 shortly after graduating from Minneapolis College of Art and Design. Together they pursue a variety of both collaborative and personal projects from Lucker’s kinetic sculptures to Wood’s illustrated papercraft. Wood refers to her process as “drawing with scissors,” and merges aspects of both paper cutting and traditional illustration with ink. After forming the moths, butterflies, feathers, and flowers, the pieces are then carefully arranged within collection boxes designed by Dean. You can follow more of their work on Instagram and on their portfolio site. (thnx, Diana!)

See related posts on Colossal about , , , , .

Fictional Butterflies Animated as Illuminated GIFs by Vladimir Stankovic 

Australia-based illustrator Vladimir Stankovic has created several series of GIFs depicting his fantastical portrayal of the natural world, animating subjects such as Cepharthropoda (animals with characteristics of both cephalopods and arthropods), Cephalopodoptera (his cross between mollusks and insects), and the Lepiodoptera Obscura (seen here). Within this series he illustrates the lifecycle of a “hidden butterfly,” extravagantly colored insects that exist in some of the most remote areas of tropical rainforests.

You can see more of his fictional additions to natural history on his Instagram and Behance, and find fine art prints of his subjects on his Etsy.

See related posts on Colossal about , , .

A Caiman Wearing a Crown of Butterflies Photographed by Mark Cowan 

cowan-caiman

Photograph by Mark Cowan

While traveling through the Amazon to study reptile and amphibian diversity with the Herpetology Division at the University of Michigan, photographer Mark Cowan happened upon a strange sight: a caiman whose head was nearly covered in butterflies. The phenomenon itself isn’t particularly unusual, salt is critical to the survival of many creatures like butterflies and bees who sometimes drink tears from reptiles in regions where the mineral is scarce (we’ve seen the same thing happen with turtles). What made this sight so unusual was seeing the butterflies organize themselves into three different species groups atop the caiman’s head.

Uh, also, that side eye!

closeup

Cowan’s photograph received special commendation from the 2016 Royal Society Publishing photography competition, you can see the rest of this year’s finalists here.

See related posts on Colossal about , , .

Welded Insects Produced From Salvaged Metal Scraps by John Brown 

GreenHand_05

Gathering spare pieces of metal, John Brown assembles his findings into sculptures of colorful butterflies, insects, and birds. Although the assemblages are formed from salvaged materials like nails and bicycle chains, the pieces somehow remain delicate, wings appearing just as thin as a butterfly’s own. After welding each piece together, Brown finishes the sculpture by painting the wings with oil paint, accurately copying the markings of specific species such as the Holly Blue and Red Admiral butterflies.

The Wales-based sculptor has lived in the rural west of his country for the past eight years, inspired by the fauna-rich valleys that compose the region. You can see more of his metal insects and other welded figures on his Facebook and Etsy page. (via Lustik)

GreenHand_06

Greenhand_08

GreenHand_03

GreenHand_07

GreenHand_09

mantis-3

mantis

See related posts on Colossal about , , , , , .

Artist Paul Villinski Brings Flight to the Gallery with Swarms of Repurposed Aluminum Can Butterflies 

paul-3
Fallen, 2015 Steel, aluminum (found cans), wire, soot, Flashe; 62-3/4″ x 113-1/4″ x 9-1/2″

Working with repurposed objects like aluminum cans and old gloves, artist Paul Villinski (previously) explores themes of flight, environmentalism, as well as addiction and recovery. His primary muse has taken the form of butterflies rendered in multiples as they swirl across walls, or carefully organize into shapes (fun fact: a group of butterflies is called a kaleidoscope).

“Underlying everything is the drive to simply share human experience in a way that elicits feelings of recognition and belonging — an impulse behind much of the history of art,” says Villinski. “I want to create images and experiences that allow viewers to ‘identify,’ to feel our commonality, to know that they are not alone.”

The son of an Air Force navigator, Villinski is an experienced pilot of sailplanes, paragliders and single-engine airplanes. These experiences of soaring through the sky are something he hopes to connect his audience with through his artwork. He shares with Jonathan Ferrara Gallery:

I’m not alone in this: from Leonardo to Lindbergh to Lenny Kravitz, the desire to “fly away” has had a grip on our collective imagination for millennia. Now and then, I have the extraordinary luck to spend a few hours floating along on currents of warm air, the earth’s surface slipping silently by, the mundane anxieties of daily life thousands of feet below the long, white wings of my glider. Back in the studio, I wish I could bring everyone I’ve ever met along in the tiny cockpit of my sailplane. Instead, I look for forms to describe the longing to enter the sky, to get us all aloft, even from within the confines of the gallery.

You can see Villinski’s current exhibition Departure at Jonathan Ferrara Gallery in New Orleans through December 26, 2015.

paul-10

paul-4
Mirror VIII, 2015. Wood frame, aluminum (found cans) wire, steel, Flashe; 50-1/2″ x 43-1/4″ x 9-1/2″

paul-5
Cirrus, 2015. Powder coated steel, found aluminum cans, wire, blue Flashe; Overall: 114 x 37 x 8 in

paul-6
Lense, 2015. Aluminum (found cans), wire, Flashe, latex on MDF and steel panel; 48″ x 48″ x 11″

paul-7
Paradigm (installation view), 2014. Wall: Return Floor: Self-Portrait

paul-8
Arcus, 2012. Aluminum (found cans), stainless steel wire, Flashe; 62” x 142” x 9”

paul-9
Arcus, detail

paul-1
Nightfall, 2015. Found gloves, rivets, steel; 122″ x 36″ x 12″

paul-2
Nightfall, detail

See related posts on Colossal about , , .

Page 1 of 41234