Posts tagged
with butterflies

Illustration Photography

New Flower Arrangements Formed Into Exotic Butterflies and Moths by Raku Inoue

February 6, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

Montreal-based fashion designer and creative Raku Inoue (previously) continues his Natura Insects series with a focus on brilliantly colored moths and butterflies. The delicate insects were created from seasonal leaves and blooms, with pastel petals and green leaves composing those made in late summer, and warmer tones and brown leaves forming the works made in mid-fall.

The artist learned the importance of utilizing seasonal materials while studying the art of Ikebana—the Japanese art of floral arrangement. This training taught Inoue to respect the nature he works with and only use what is most abundant, rather than focusing on what might look most attractive. Often after a rain he will collect the petals that have fallen to the ground, using these naturally-provided elements rather than searching for flowers still connected to their tree or stem.

You can see more arrangements from his continuing series on Instagram.




Butterfly Specimen Boxes Painted as Multi-Story Murals by Mantra

October 18, 2017

Christopher Jobson

Wiener Schmetterlinge, 2017. Wien, Austria.

France-based street artist Mantra has been unveiling a series of trompe l’oeil murals that convert the facades of commercial and residential buildings into larger-than-life butterfly display cases in Spain, Austria, France, and Bogota. Seen here are a few pieces from the last year, but you can explore a bit more on Facebook.
(via Lustik)

El asalto de Apollo, 2017. Saragosse, Spain.

Mariposas de Aragón, 2017. Festival Internacional de Arte Urbano. Photo by Juanjo Fernandez.

Mariposas de Aragón, progress.

Yasuni’s Imago, 2017. Thionville, France.

Bogota, 2015.

Collaboration with Stinkfish. Vienna, Austria.



Art Craft

Large New Embroidered Textile Moths and Cicadas by Yumi Okita

August 4, 2017

Christopher Jobson

These oversized moths and insects by Yumi Okita (previously) are constructed with fabric, embroidery thread, fake fur, wire, and feathers. The Raleigh-based artist makes each piece by hand, creating faithful interpretations of actual insects like the Oleander Hawk Moth or the Peacock Butterfly. You can see many of her most recent creations on Etsy.



Art Craft

Flora and Fauna Paper Constructions by Ann Wood and Dean Lucker

July 6, 2017

Christopher Jobson

Artist duo Ann Wood and Dean Lucker (aka Woodlucker) forged a partnership in 1987 shortly after graduating from Minneapolis College of Art and Design. Together they pursue a variety of both collaborative and personal projects from Lucker’s kinetic sculptures to Wood’s illustrated papercraft. Wood refers to her process as “drawing with scissors,” and merges aspects of both paper cutting and traditional illustration with ink. After forming the moths, butterflies, feathers, and flowers, the pieces are then carefully arranged within collection boxes designed by Dean. You can follow more of their work on Instagram and on their portfolio site. (thnx, Diana!)



Animation Illustration

Fictional Butterflies Animated as Illuminated GIFs by Vladimir Stankovic

April 20, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

Australia-based illustrator Vladimir Stankovic has created several series of GIFs depicting his fantastical portrayal of the natural world, animating subjects such as Cepharthropoda (animals with characteristics of both cephalopods and arthropods), Cephalopodoptera (his cross between mollusks and insects), and the Lepiodoptera Obscura (seen here). Within this series he illustrates the lifecycle of a “hidden butterfly,” extravagantly colored insects that exist in some of the most remote areas of tropical rainforests.

You can see more of his fictional additions to natural history on his Instagram and Behance, and find fine art prints of his subjects on his Etsy.



Photography Science

A Caiman Wearing a Crown of Butterflies Photographed by Mark Cowan

September 15, 2016

Christopher Jobson


Photograph by Mark Cowan

While traveling through the Amazon to study reptile and amphibian diversity with the Herpetology Division at the University of Michigan, photographer Mark Cowan happened upon a strange sight: a caiman whose head was nearly covered in butterflies. The phenomenon itself isn’t particularly unusual, salt is critical to the survival of many creatures like butterflies and bees who sometimes drink tears from reptiles in regions where the mineral is scarce (we’ve seen the same thing happen with turtles). What made this sight so unusual was seeing the butterflies organize themselves into three different species groups atop the caiman’s head.

Uh, also, that side eye!


Cowan’s photograph received special commendation from the 2016 Royal Society Publishing photography competition, you can see the rest of this year’s finalists here.




Welded Insects Produced From Salvaged Metal Scraps by John Brown

December 18, 2015

Kate Sierzputowski


Gathering spare pieces of metal, John Brown assembles his findings into sculptures of colorful butterflies, insects, and birds. Although the assemblages are formed from salvaged materials like nails and bicycle chains, the pieces somehow remain delicate, wings appearing just as thin as a butterfly’s own. After welding each piece together, Brown finishes the sculpture by painting the wings with oil paint, accurately copying the markings of specific species such as the Holly Blue and Red Admiral butterflies.

The Wales-based sculptor has lived in the rural west of his country for the past eight years, inspired by the fauna-rich valleys that compose the region. You can see more of his metal insects and other welded figures on his Facebook and Etsy page. (via Lustik)