Tag Archives: cameras

A Homemade Multipoint Pinhole Camera Made from 32,000 Drinking Straws 

Using 32,000 black drinking straws, collaborators Michael (Mick) Farrell and Cliff Haynes created the Straw Camera, a homemade camera they began experimenting with in 2007. Despite the connection one might draw to a pinhole camera, the Straw Camera actually functions quite differently, producing a multipoint perspective from an array rather than a single point perspective.

The direct analogue process records the light collected from each straw onto a piece of paper secured to the back of the camera. The camera gives a direct 1:1 view of the subject that is placed before it, however it translates the image to one that mirrors that of pointillist painting, breaking the subject into thousands of little dots.

“In a world beset by selfies with their immediate gratification, and HD television in all its glory feeding our visual appetite, a Straw Camera image of an individual, with its engineering projection and disappearance of the subject into the near fog of visual capture, gives the viewer a glimpse of just how transitory perception is,” said Cliff about the camera.

To read more about the project, check out the photography duo’s website for the Straw Camera, or their book which was published earlier this month. (via PetaPixel)

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The Jollylook Is a ‘Retro’ Folding Polaroid Camera Made from Recycled Cardboard 

The Jollylook is a new camera concept that merges the retro form-factor of a fold out camera utilizing polaroid film, and it’s fabricated primarily from recycled cardboard. Despite the bare-bones construction the Jollylook has an adjustable aperture, lens settings for different shooting modes (landscape, portrait, group, or macro), and a crank for extracting the polaroid once the image is taken. All you have to do is load it up with commonly available Fujifilm “instax mini” instant film cartridges. The project is currently funding on Kickstarter and reached their goal in just a few hours. (via PetaPixel)

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New Camera Allows You to Zoom in to the Surface of the Moon. Way In. 

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In a great example of just how powerful consumer cameras have become, watch as this Nikon P900 zooms into the night sky, transporting you from a parking lot in Quebec to the surface of the moon. According to DL Cade at PetaPixel, the built-in optical zoom maxes out at 83x but the camera is capable of continuing with digital zoom. “The P900 features 166x ‘Dynamic Fine Zoom,’ putting the final equivalent focal length at a mind-numbing 4000mm.” I don’t even know that that means exactly but it sounds like a whole lotta zoom. Video by Daniel Pelletier. (via Sploid, PetaPixel)

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Site-Specific Pinhole Cameras Constructed From Nature Capture the Pacific Northwest 

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Site-specific pinhole image of Pescadero Creek, image via David Janesko

In a meta, Mother Nature-inspired project, artists David Janesko and Adam Donnelly use objects from the earth to photograph the environment from which they are found, often utilizing leaves, logs, dirt, and scattered wood to produce hazy images of the world around them. To date, the pair has made approximately 28 cameras, each with a preexisting lens. Janesko and Donnelly do not create an aperture for the natural cameras by hand, but rather use ones already available in the form of a chewed hole in a leaf or a piece of bark that already has a crack.

The body of the camera is much larger, and like the lens, is only constructed from the material around them, much like a small fort. One of the two will stand outside the camera as a shutter, while the other remains inside with the photographic paper, sometimes for as long as 45 minutes. “We build and photograph with the camera in a single day, we leave the camera as we made it, to fall apart and disappear back into the environment,” Janesko told The Creators Project.

Janesko and Donnelly attempt to capture the physical experience of their cameras in each photograph—producing a muffled and patient image of the lands which they enter. Previously the two had documented the San Francisco Bay Area, but are now heading to the Rio Grande River where their new land cameras will be recorded for an upcoming documentary. You can learn more about the film on their IndieGoGo. (via The Creators Project)

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Pinhole leaf lens, image via David Janesko

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Coachella Valley (2015), image via Adam Donnelly

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Site-specific pinhole image of Big Basin, image via David Janesko

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Alamere Falls (2015), image via Adam Donnelly

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King’s Canyon (2015), image via Adam Donnelly

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Coachella Valley (2015), image via Adam Donnelly

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Site-specific pinhole image of Point Reyes Kehoe Beach, image via David Janesko

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Gazo’s Creek (2015), image via Adam Donnelly

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Gazo’s Creek (2015), image via Adam Donnelly

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This Book Is a Camera: A Functioning Pinhole Camera Inside a Pop-Up Book 

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Artist and designer Kelli Anderson just released her latest book This Book is a Camera, a pop-up book that turns into a fully functional pinhole camera. The book acts as a simple educational tool to help explain how photography worked before we all had camera phones in our pockets. Anderson points out that making a simple camera obscura really isn’t too difficult and provides instructions on how you can make one yourself.

This Book is a Camera comes complete with a starter pack of B/W Ilford photo paper and instructions on how to use the camera to take photos. You’ll still need to pick up some developer fluid and have a dark room to develop photos in. Stay tuned for Anderson’s forthcoming This Book is a Planetarium from Chronicle Books. (via Quipsologies)

Update: This Book is a Camera is now available in the Colossal Shop.

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Example photograph taken with This Book is a Camera

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Example photograph taken with This Book is a Camera

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Artist Installs Flocks of Surveillance Cameras and Satellite Dishes in Outdoor Settings 

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From far away Czech artist Jakub Geltner's works appear as flocks of birds, seagulls and pigeons gathered on clusters of rocks or resting just beneath a busy overpass. When one looks closer however they realize the groupings are not perched birds, but rather surveillance cameras and satellite dishes the artist has installed as a part of his series “Nest.”

Geltner’s most recent installation is titled ‘Nest 05,’ which was presented at the 2015 Sculpture by the Sea in Aarhus, Denmark. The installation, which covers a stretch of mossy rocks, explores the notion of surveillance in even our most peaceful places—the areas we seek when we want to escape.

The Prague-based artist has been installing these works since 2011, bringing together groups of technological equipment commonly used to observe, and turning them into the focal point for the viewer. Within the last four years his works have been placed at a former elementary school, church facade, waterfront, and the skeleton structure of a former KV KSC (Regional Committee of the Communist Party of Czechoslovakia).

Geltner lives and works in Prague and graduated from two universities also in the city, Czech Technical University in 2004 and the Academy of Fine Arts in 2013. (via iGNANT)

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Photo by Claire Voon for Hyperallergic

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