Tag Archives: candy

Realistic Animal Lollipops and Sugar Sculptures by ‘Amezaiku’ Artisan Shinri Tezuka

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Ever had a hankering to taste a slippery goldfish or a wriggling tadpole? Now you’re in luck thanks to a new candy shop in Tokyo called Ameshin that offers traditional Japanese amezaiku, a form of artisinal candy making that dates back to the 8th century when the edible objects were offered at temples or given as gifts. The lollipops and other confectionary beasts are made by the shop’s owner, 26-year-old Shinri Tezuka, from a mixture of starch and sugary syrup (somewhat like taffy) that results in a translucent, almost glasslike candy. Tezuka shares more of his latest creations on the Ameshin website and Facebook page. (via Spoon & Tamago)

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Colorful Psychedelic Installations of Sugar and Candy by Pip & Pop

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“I saw a dream like this” at Australian Experimental Art Foundation, Adelaide 2013. Photos by Andre Castellucci and Pip & Pop

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“I saw a dream like this” at Australian Experimental Art Foundation, Adelaide 2013. Photos by Andre Castellucci and Pip & Pop

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“Through a hole in the mountain” at MT Kurashiki, Japan 2014. Photos by Keizo Kioku

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“Through a hole in the mountain” at MT Kurashiki, Japan 2014. Photos by Keizo Kioku

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“Candy Lab” at Mediamatic, Amsterdam, Netherlands 2014. Photos by Willem Velthoven and Pip & Pop

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“Candy Lab” at Mediamatic, Amsterdam, Netherlands 2014. Photos by Willem Velthoven and Pip & Pop

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“Candy Lab” at Mediamatic, Amsterdam, Netherlands 2014. Photos by Willem Velthoven and Pip & Pop

Australian artist Tanya Schultz creates immersive wonderlands using the sweetest materials: colorful sugar and candy. But along with the hundreds of pounds of sugar, the miniature worlds, which are reminiscent of mythological lands made from food, often incorporate as many ingredients as there are colors. Working under the pseudonym Pip & Pop, Schultz uses everything from glitter and pipe cleaners to beads and figurines to create her psychedelic installations, which have been exhibited all around the world.

Pip and Pop began as a duo in 2007 but since 2011 Schultz has been working alone, or sometimes collaborating with other artist or creative companies, to create her elaborate installations. Check out what she’s been up to recently and allow yourself to be transported to imaginary worlds where sugar rains from the sky and streets are paved with candies. (via Cross Connect)

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Handmade Candy: Watch as Giant Blobs of Melted Sugar are Embedded with Tiny Designs

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This video from La Confiserie CandyLabs in Montreal demonstrates the labor-intensive process of rolling traditional hard candy. Each design starts with colored and flavored strips of heated sugar which are precisely rolled together into an increasingly large log-like shape. Despite reaching a final diameter of nearly 6″, the form is then stretched impossibly thin to create hundreds of pieces of tiny hard candies. From start to finish the entire process takes about three hours, during which the candy (and candy maker) never stop moving for more than a few seconds. You can see more of their candy designs over on Facebook. (via Neatorama)

An Edible Zen Rock Garden Made From Japanese Sweets

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Zen rock gardens are typically composed of carefully placed rocks, surrounded by sand that is raked to represent water ripples. They’re supposed to inspire a meditative state of calm and relaxation. They’re not supposed to inspire hunger and a sudden urge to put it in your mouth. Except this one does because it’s made of entirely edible ingredients. “In cities today, people do not have the luxury of gazing at gardens,” says Japanese designer Tomonori Saito, lamenting the loss of one his nation’s most relaxing pastimes. So he decided to create “Shin-an-ji Rock Garden” made from black sesame (the rocks) and sugar (the sand). Now you can have your garden and eat it too. (syndicated from Spoon & Tamago)

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Gingerbread Art Museums by Caitlin Levin and Henry Hargreaves

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Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York, Frank Lloyd Wright. Icing, gingerbread, cotton candy, candy wrappers, licorice, sugar.

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Karuizawa Museum, Nagano, Yasui Hideo. Chocolate, gingerbread, hard candy, cotton candy, sour flush.

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The Louvre, Paris, I.M.Pei. Gingerbread, hard candy, licorice.

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Museum Aan de Stroom (MAS), Antwerp, Neutelings Riedijk Architects. Gingerbread, lego candy, hard candy, sesame candy, chocolate, bubble gum, sour rolls.

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Maxxi – National Museum of the 21st Century Arts, Rome, Zaha Hadid. Gingerbread, hard candy, lollipop sticks.

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Museo Soumaya, Mexico City, Fernando Romero. Candy balls, gingerbread, sour rolls, taffy.

Tate Modern
Tate Modern, London, Herzog & de Meuron. Gingerbread, hard candy, cotton candy, bubble gum.

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Recently completed for display at Dylan’s Candy Bar during Art Basel Miami, these towering architectural creations of the world’s most famous art museums and galleries were created with gingerbread and candy by food artists Caitlin Levin and Henry Hargreaves. An array of hard candy windows forms the iconic pyramid extension at the Louvre, while icing and gingerbread form the smooth curves of the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum. Some of the iconic structures are so immaculately detailed that once photographed in black and white they almost look like the real thing. You can see more behind the scenes photos here.

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Color Coded Candy by Emily Blincoe

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Earlier this summer Austin-based photographer Emily Blincoe created this comprehensive series of various candy organized by color called her Sugar Series. Such a great mix of common and nostalgic sweets. And … white underpants on a stick. You can see these and many additional objects organized by shape or color in her Colors Organized Neatly set on Flickr. You can also follow her adventures over on Instagram.

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The Time You Have (In Jelly Beans)

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In a poignant new video, online performance artist Ze Frank physically illustrates how most people spend the majority of their life using jelly beans to delineate time. Starting with 28,835 beans representing days of the average human lifespan he slowly subtracts the time spent sleeping, working, eating, and commuting to arrive at a much smaller square by proportion that represents our “free” time that suddenly puts things in stark perspective. Hopefully some of those working, cooking, and caring days are just as fulfilling as the days you have left to fill with fun, art, and adventure.

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