Tag Archives: cardboard

Sprawling Cardboard Architecture by Nina Lindgren

Sprawling Cardboard Architecture by Nina Lindgren sculpture cardboard architecture

Sprawling Cardboard Architecture by Nina Lindgren sculpture cardboard architecture

Sprawling Cardboard Architecture by Nina Lindgren sculpture cardboard architecture

Sprawling Cardboard Architecture by Nina Lindgren sculpture cardboard architecture

Sprawling Cardboard Architecture by Nina Lindgren sculpture cardboard architecture

Sprawling Cardboard Architecture by Nina Lindgren sculpture cardboard architecture

Stockholm-based illustrator, printmaker, and artist Nina Lindgren was been working with cardboard to build a series of stacked geometric cityscapes that look like small architectural islands. The works are assembled like puzzles from carefully cut cardboard panels with internal lights for some of the houses. Her most recent piece, “Floating City” was recently on view at ArtRebels Gallery. You can see more over on her website. (via Hi-Fructose)

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Imaginative Industrial Flying Machines Made From Cardboard by Daniel Agdag

Imaginative Industrial Flying Machines Made From Cardboard by Daniel Agdag sculpture flying flight cardboard

Imaginative Industrial Flying Machines Made From Cardboard by Daniel Agdag sculpture flying flight cardboard

Imaginative Industrial Flying Machines Made From Cardboard by Daniel Agdag sculpture flying flight cardboard

Imaginative Industrial Flying Machines Made From Cardboard by Daniel Agdag sculpture flying flight cardboard

Imaginative Industrial Flying Machines Made From Cardboard by Daniel Agdag sculpture flying flight cardboard

If you want to create detailed and imaginative flying machine sculptures that look like they’re about to take flight, cardboard is hardly the material to use. Unless of course you’re artist Daniel Agdag (previously), who has been toiling away creating a series of new works each more detailed and fascinating than the next. “The Principles of Aerodynamics” is Agdag’s first solo exhibition where his series of cardboard contraptions that portray his “ongoing pursuit of escape through the metaphor of flight” will be on display through Aug 31, 2014.

As he’s done in the past, Agdag forfeits all blueprints, drawings and plans choosing, instead, to work only from mind and scalpel. His industrial beasts–get close and you can almost smell the oil and smoke; hear the clanking and buzzing–come together only from sliced cardboard hinged with glue.

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Ordinary Behavior: Cardboard Electronics Containing Absurd Miniature Dioramas

Ordinary Behavior: Cardboard Electronics Containing Absurd Miniature Dioramas paper miniature electronics dioramas cardboard

Ordinary Behavior: Cardboard Electronics Containing Absurd Miniature Dioramas paper miniature electronics dioramas cardboard

Ordinary Behavior: Cardboard Electronics Containing Absurd Miniature Dioramas paper miniature electronics dioramas cardboard

Ordinary Behavior: Cardboard Electronics Containing Absurd Miniature Dioramas paper miniature electronics dioramas cardboard

Artist and illustrator Kevin LCK works almost exclusively in black and white, so it comes as no surprise that as he’s ventured into sculptural objects the aesthetic has remained the same, while the dimensions clearly haven’t. In his new series Ordinary Behavior the artist builds dioramas into everyday electronic objects made from cardboard such as a computer, camera, and iPhone. The artist says his intention is to highlight the sometimes unhealthy relationship people have with technology and explains his thoughts in his artist statement:

‘Ordinary Behavior’ is a project about the unhealthy relationship between human and technology in an everyday context. […] I seeked to detach the audience from the real world temporarily, provide them with a space to rethink and reconsider the way we behave and think about the relationship between ourselves, objects and environment with technology in a more conscious way.

You can see several more from the series here, and see how several of the objects came together on his blog. (via beautiful/decay, junk culture)

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Cardboard Cutout Stop Motion Animations by Rogier Wieland

Cardboard Cutout Stop Motion Animations by Rogier Wieland stop motion cardboard animation

Cardboard Cutout Stop Motion Animations by Rogier Wieland stop motion cardboard animation

These two videos by animator Rogier Wieland (previously) have been around for quite a bit but somehow the totally escaped me. The two shorts were created using video stills transferred to cardboard cutouts that were then animated on location to create a fantastic visual. If you liked this also check out Sticky Man by 15-year-old budding animator Eduard Taberner.

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Sets for a Film I’ll Never Make: The Unbelievably Intricate Cardboard Sculptures of Daniel Agdag

Sets for a Film Ill Never Make: The Unbelievably Intricate Cardboard Sculptures of Daniel Agdag sculpture paper cardboard

Sets for a Film Ill Never Make: The Unbelievably Intricate Cardboard Sculptures of Daniel Agdag sculpture paper cardboard

Sets for a Film Ill Never Make: The Unbelievably Intricate Cardboard Sculptures of Daniel Agdag sculpture paper cardboard

Sets for a Film Ill Never Make: The Unbelievably Intricate Cardboard Sculptures of Daniel Agdag sculpture paper cardboard

Sets for a Film Ill Never Make: The Unbelievably Intricate Cardboard Sculptures of Daniel Agdag sculpture paper cardboard

Sets for a Film Ill Never Make: The Unbelievably Intricate Cardboard Sculptures of Daniel Agdag sculpture paper cardboard

Sets for a Film Ill Never Make: The Unbelievably Intricate Cardboard Sculptures of Daniel Agdag sculpture paper cardboard

Sets for a Film Ill Never Make: The Unbelievably Intricate Cardboard Sculptures of Daniel Agdag sculpture paper cardboard

If you ask Melbourne-based artist Daniel Agdag what he does, he’ll tell you that he makes things out of cardboard. However this statement hardly captures the absurd complexity and detail of his boxboard and PVA glue sculptures that push the limits of the medium. Agdag is an award-winning creator of stop-motion films and this new series of work, Sets for a Film I’ll Never Make, feature a number of his structural experiments which he refers to simply as “sketching with cardboard”. Miraculously, each work is created without detailed plans or drawings and are almost wholly improvised as he works. You can see these latest sculptures at Off the Kerb Gallery starting October 26, 2012 in Melbourne’s inner north suburb of Collingwood.

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Cardboard Sculptures by Bartek Elsner

Cardboard Sculptures by Bartek Elsner sculpture installation cardboard

Cardboard Sculptures by Bartek Elsner sculpture installation cardboard

Cardboard Sculptures by Bartek Elsner sculpture installation cardboard

Cardboard Sculptures by Bartek Elsner sculpture installation cardboard

Cardboard Sculptures by Bartek Elsner sculpture installation cardboard

Cardboard Sculptures by Bartek Elsner sculpture installation cardboard

Cardboard Sculptures by Bartek Elsner sculpture installation cardboard

Cardboard Sculptures by Bartek Elsner sculpture installation cardboard

German art director and designer Bartek Elsner creates all kinds of clever sculptures using only humble cardboard. The pieces range from public street art, to large scale sculptures of trees, birds and even a gigantic internet device. You can see much more on his Paper Stuff blog and on Behance. (via who killed bambi)

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Box Typography

Box Typography typography fonts cardboard alphabet

Box Typography typography fonts cardboard alphabet

Box Typography typography fonts cardboard alphabet

Box Typography typography fonts cardboard alphabet

Graphic design by Belinda De Bruyn.

We had to make a Typo-poster for the ABC-House (Art Basics for Children) that would both speak to the children and their parents. The type is completely made out of boxes. It says: “Teaching is the art of assisting discovery”

(via behance)

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