Tag Archives: ceramics

Music and Sound Vibrations 3D Printed Into Ceramic Vessels 

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All images via Studio van Broekhoven

Bouncing rhythmically to a deep beat, Studio van Broekhoven’s 3D printer produces ceramic vessels scored by sound. The objects spins as clay is applied in response to the amplified noise, forging visual markings into the clay by way of audio wavelengths. The project, “Solid Vibration” was produced by spatial sound designer Ricky van Broekhoven and designer Olivier van Herpt, who have been co-producing the objects that appear almost like woven baskets.

The project developed out of the collaborators’ combined wish to host Broekhoven’s “noisescapes” as solidified objects that could physically represent his abstract tones. For each of the vessels, a specially constructed speaker rig is mounted below the printing platform to emit a low sound that will influence the printing. “A moment in time, a song, a sound, they can now become objects that encapsulate the moment forever,” explains van Herpt’s website.

You can hear more of van Broekhoven’s work here, while taking a glance at more of van Herpt’s ceramics here. (via The Creator’s Project)

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A Camera Mounted to a Potter’s Wheel Puts Ceramics in a Dizzying New Perspective 

Watching a ceramist work at a potter’s wheel is a mesmerizing and nearly meditative process as the wet clay slowly morphs into shape, spinning so quickly it loses definition almost completely. Eric Landon from Tortus Copenhagen was curious to see what things might look like from the clay’s perspective and mounted a camera to the edge of a potter’s wheel as he worked on a vase. It’s fascinating to see the world become a blur while the clay and wheel remains in sharp focus. If you liked this, also watch this video of Mikhail Sadovnikov as he draws unusual designs with leftover slip (clay sludge). (via The Kid Should See This)

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New Surrealist Sculptures by Ellen Jewett Effortlessly Combine Animals With Their Fantastical Surroundings 

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Ellen Jewett (previously) effortlessly blends animals with elements from their environments, creating ceramic pieces that often balance unexpected species together in a singular piece. Each work is highly detailed—flowers, leaves, and vines wrapping themselves around animals from coyotes to chameleons.

By focusing on negative spaces within the animals’ bodies, Jewett strips away the weight of her objects, a quality that is usually inextricably linked to the medium of sculpture. She constructs her ceramic pieces using an additive technique, beginning with the innermost parts of the sculptures and layering outward. As periphery components of the animals’ surroundings are added to the piece, a narrative begins to form. These additional pieces Jewett describes as being beautiful, grotesque, or fantastical and add to the object’s exploration of domestication, death, growth, visibility, and wildness.

Jewett’s materials are just as important as her process—only using clay, paints, finishes, and glazes that are free from toxic properties. In addition to being toxic free, she also attempts to source locally and naturally whenever possible. You can keep updated on the Canadian artist’s new work on her Facebook page, and several new pieces are currently available.

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Polymer Flower Sculptures and Tiles by Angela Schwer 

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Working from a tiny table in the nook of her living room, California-based artist Angela Schwer crafts explosive dahlias, gardenias, poppies, fungi, and sea creatures all from a custom blend of polymer clays. Meant primarily as decorative objects, the dense handmade pieces are surprisingly detailed, assembled from hundreds of perfectly formed clay pieces and formed into large tiles that can be hung from a wall or set on a table. You can see more in her online shop, Dilly Pad.

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Hypnotizing New Concentric Ceramic Vessels by Matthew Chambers 

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Usually people describe staring at a spinning pottery wheel as being somewhat hypnotizing, not staring at ceramic artworks themselves. But such is the case with these uncanny pieces by Matthew Chambers (previously) who continues to push the limits of his concentric stoneware vessels. Every visible layer in his sculptures is individually crafted on a wheel before Chambers assembles them, with a single piece containing dozens of objects. The artist experiments with color, scale, and the patterns by which each piece is internally situated to form colorful gradients or suggest motion across a sequences of sculptures.

Seen here is a collection of more recent work and you can see much more on Mouvements Mordernes and Puls Ceramics. Chambers will also have new pieces on view at the Campden Gallery in Gloucestershire starting October 10th.

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Ceramic Sculptures That Unravel Before Your Eyes 

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Ceramicist Haejin Lee creates sculptures that seem to unravel before your eyes, ceramic forms that open and splay outwards to make vessels unusable and faces far more interesting. Utilizing minimal color Lee instead focuses on her shapeshifting creations, often incorporating human elements like eyes and mouths that sprout from the banded chaos.

The South Korean artist worked in her native country for 10 years before moving to Vancouver, BC two years ago. She is a graduate of Hong-Ik University in Korea, where she received a masters degree in ceramic art. Her studio in Vancouver focuses on functional tableware designs that are modern and simple, balancing her more abstractly formed works. You can see more of her tableware line and other works from her Canadian studio on her Instagram. (via Cross Connect Magazine)

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Trompe L’Oeil Ceramics That Imitate the Natural Appearance of Decaying Wood 

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Going Hand In Hand, 8.5″ x 26″ x 15.5″, 2015, (Ceramic, acrylic)

Ceramicist Christopher David White (previously) accurately captures the decay of wood through ceramics, portraying the distinct character of the natural material from the fine wood grain to the light ash coloration at the pieces’ edges. By utilizing a trompe l’oeil technique, White forces the viewer to take a closer look at his work while also investigating the truth hidden in the hyperrealistic sculptures.

Through his ceramic pieces White explores the reality of impermanence, often combining man and nature through treelike limbs and faces. “I seek to expose the beauty that often results from decay while, at the same time, making my viewer question their own perception of the world around them,” explains White. He hopes to highlight the fact that we are not separate from nature, but rather intrinsically connected to it.

White has a BFA in Ceramics from Indiana University and MFA in Craft and Material Studies from Virginia Commonwealth University. White’s work will be included in the exhibition Hyper-realism at the Daejeon Museum of Art in South Korea opening this fall. (via Artist a Day)

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Going Hand In Hand, 8.5″ x 26″ x 15.5″, 2015, (Ceramic, acrylic)

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Going Hand In Hand, 8.5″ x 26″ x 15.5″, 2015, (Ceramic, acrylic)

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A Walk That Is Measured And Slow, 14″ x 14″ 29″, 2015, (Ceramic, acrylic, drywall, iron oxide)

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A Walk That Is Measured And Slow, 14″ x 14″ 29″, 2015, (Ceramic, acrylic, drywall, iron oxide)

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A Walk That Is Measured And Slow, 14″ x 14″ 29″, 2015, (Ceramic, acrylic, drywall, iron oxide)

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Asphyxia, 2013, H: 11″ W: 9″ D: 11″, (Ceramic, acrylic)

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Asphyxia, 2013, H: 11″ W: 9″ D: 11″, (Ceramic, acrylic)

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Asphyxia, 2013, H: 11″ W: 9″ D: 11″, (Ceramic, acrylic)

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