Tag Archives: ceramics

Ceramic Sculptures That Unravel Before Your Eyes

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Ceramicist Haejin Lee creates sculptures that seem to unravel before your eyes, ceramic forms that open and splay outwards to make vessels unusable and faces far more interesting. Utilizing minimal color Lee instead focuses on her shapeshifting creations, often incorporating human elements like eyes and mouths that sprout from the banded chaos.

The South Korean artist worked in her native country for 10 years before moving to Vancouver, BC two years ago. She is a graduate of Hong-Ik University in Korea, where she received a masters degree in ceramic art. Her studio in Vancouver focuses on functional tableware designs that are modern and simple, balancing her more abstractly formed works. You can see more of her tableware line and other works from her Canadian studio on her Instagram. (via Cross Connect Magazine)

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Reference Work 2_LeeHaejin_Reflection_L90 x D60 x H100cm_2008

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Trompe L’Oeil Ceramics That Imitate the Natural Appearance of Decaying Wood

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Going Hand In Hand, 8.5″ x 26″ x 15.5″, 2015, (Ceramic, acrylic)

Ceramicist Christopher David White (previously) accurately captures the decay of wood through ceramics, portraying the distinct character of the natural material from the fine wood grain to the light ash coloration at the pieces’ edges. By utilizing a trompe l’oeil technique, White forces the viewer to take a closer look at his work while also investigating the truth hidden in the hyperrealistic sculptures.

Through his ceramic pieces White explores the reality of impermanence, often combining man and nature through treelike limbs and faces. “I seek to expose the beauty that often results from decay while, at the same time, making my viewer question their own perception of the world around them,” explains White. He hopes to highlight the fact that we are not separate from nature, but rather intrinsically connected to it.

White has a BFA in Ceramics from Indiana University and MFA in Craft and Material Studies from Virginia Commonwealth University. White’s work will be included in the exhibition Hyper-realism at the Daejeon Museum of Art in South Korea opening this fall. (via Artist a Day)

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Going Hand In Hand, 8.5″ x 26″ x 15.5″, 2015, (Ceramic, acrylic)

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Going Hand In Hand, 8.5″ x 26″ x 15.5″, 2015, (Ceramic, acrylic)

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A Walk That Is Measured And Slow, 14″ x 14″ 29″, 2015, (Ceramic, acrylic, drywall, iron oxide)

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A Walk That Is Measured And Slow, 14″ x 14″ 29″, 2015, (Ceramic, acrylic, drywall, iron oxide)

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A Walk That Is Measured And Slow, 14″ x 14″ 29″, 2015, (Ceramic, acrylic, drywall, iron oxide)

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Asphyxia, 2013, H: 11″ W: 9″ D: 11″, (Ceramic, acrylic)

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Asphyxia, 2013, H: 11″ W: 9″ D: 11″, (Ceramic, acrylic)

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Asphyxia, 2013, H: 11″ W: 9″ D: 11″, (Ceramic, acrylic)

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Calamityware: Mugs That Remind You It Could Always Be Much Worse

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Rendered in a style mimicking traditional blue willow pattern design, artist Don Moyer illustrated these fun It-Could-Be-Worse Mugs that remind you that no matter how bad your day is, things could be catastrophically worse. How bad? Think zombie poodles, pirates, attacking UFOs, and aggressive pterodactyls swooping from the sky. The mugs are a companion piece to his ongoing series of Calamityware dishware with similar abominations depicted on fine porcelain plates first featured here last year. The set of 4 mugs are currently funding on Kickstarter. (via The Awesomer)

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Handmade Ceramic Animal Planters by Cumbuca Chic

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If you’ve been on the hunt for the perfect ceramic capybara planter, look no further. Ceramicist Priscilla Ramos from São Paulo, Brazil, has a fantastic line of animal planters in the form of foxes, whales, anteaters, and yes, even the world’s largest rodent. She’s even working on a sloth! The handmade stoneware pieces are perfect for small succulents or cacti, and you can see more in her shop: Cumbuca Chic. (via NOTCOT)

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Miniature Hand Thrown Pottery by Jon Almeda

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Master of the miniature Jon Almeda creates tiny hand thrown ceramics at 1″ scale that are every bit as detailed and perfect as their much larger counterparts. The Washington-based artist makes vases, bowls, and even tea kettles tiny enough to sit atop a coin or toothbrush. Despite their fragile beginnings, the pieces are sturdy enough to endure standard glazing and firing to emerge as fully finished ceramics. Almeda uses a custom designed motorized curio wheel that affords the precise control needed to execute minute handbuilding techniques need for each object.

To see more, you can follow him on Instagram or maybe even take a class through the International Guild of Miniature Artisans of which he is a member. (via Artfido)

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Alberto Bustos’ Paperlike Ceramics Imitate Sprouting Blades of Grass

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Inspired by forms of vegetation, Spanish artist Alberto Bustos' pieces appear like blades of grass sprouting from the earth, stretching and curling upwards towards an imagined sun. At first glance the pieces look delicate enough to be paper, layered works that exude a dual sharp and fragile quality. However, after a closer inspection one can see that the works are indeed porcelain, adding another dimension to their soft initial appearance.

Bustos lives and work in Spain and his work will be included in Mas De Les Gralles with 40 other international artists on June 13th just outside of Barcelona. Hundreds more images of his work can be found on his Facebook page here. (via Ron Beck Designs)

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Erosion: Layered Porcelain Sculptures Sandblasted to Mimic Biological Forms

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British ceramicist Tamsin van Essen is fascinated by what she describes as the “the fragile boundary between attraction and repulsion,” a place where tension is created by the visible and the obscured. For her Erosion series Essen created layered blocks of alternating black and white porcelain which she then sandblasted to mimic biological forms similar to a parasitic virus in the process of devouring a host. In a even more literal example, she created a series of ceramic vessels that appear to be infected with specific bacteria.

Essen just spent three months working on a new body of work currently on view at Siobhan Davies Studios in London, and you can see additional pieces over on Saatchi Art. (via Coroflot)

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