Tag Archives: ceramics

New Scenes of Fantasy and Disaster on Traditional Blue Porcelain Dinner Plates by Calamityware 

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Look once you see your grandmother’s china, look twice and you see… Big Foot? Don Moyer, the graphic designer behind Calamityware (previously here and here), has designed several more white porcelain plates playfully poking the traditional blue Willow pattern design. On his plates, intricate patterns found on the outer edge trick the eye until one notices mysterious occurrences happening near the center. Pirate ships take over Victorian villages, swamp monsters grab for traditional Japanese pagodas, and erupting volcanoes threaten to overtake peaceful towns.

Two of Moyer’s newest plate designs, a group of savage zombie poodles and a soaring pterodactyl, are currently on Kickstarter. You can purchase these plates on Calamityware’s website, where you will also find some dishware crawling with ants and flies.

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New Surgically Sliced Porcelain Dishes Reveal Vibrant Floral Insides 

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With layers of porcelain surgically peeled back like skin, UK artist Beccy Ridsdel (previously) reveals the colorful internal workings of ceramic dishes. The artist refers to the pieces as “dissections in progress” and displayed earlier iterations alongside actual surgical implements to further heighten their anatomical nature. Titled “Under the Surface,” the ongoing series suggests each porcelain cup or plate has an internal biology of floral decorations that can be explored by removing bits of exterior. Many of Ridsdel’s latest pieces are currently available in her online shop.

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Ultra Satisfying Porcelain Carving Videos by Abe Haruya 

・ #ceramics #pottery #porcelain#carving #うつわ #器 #しのぎ#飯碗#帳尻合わせ #阿部春弥 ・・

A video posted by Haruya Abe 阿部春弥 (@abe_haruya) on

・ #ceramics #pottery #porcelain #うつわ#器#面取#阿部春弥 #帳尻合わせ

A video posted by Haruya Abe 阿部春弥 (@abe_haruya) on

Japanese ceramic artist Haruya Abe shares short clips of a ceramic carving technique where top layers of porcelain are gently scraped away using a scalpel-like instrument. Not only does it create beautiful results, the process is just satisfying to watch. Given the same tools, I’d scrape these pieces into oblivion. You can see more photos and videos of Haruya’s studio work here. (via @StreetArtGlobe)

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Broken Ceramics Found on the Beach, Turned Into Chopstick Rests Using Kintsugi 

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“As every Japanese has realized, the waves can take away a great deal from us,” says artist Tomomi Kamoshita. But it is also true that we greatly benefit from it.” Using broken pieces of ceramics that she picked up on the shore, and combining it with pieces of her own broken ceramics, the Tokyo-based potter uses the ancient kintsugi method of repairing ceramics to turn the shards into one-of-a-kind chopstick rests.

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If the broken pieces of ceramics could talk, some would tell you that they fell off a ship. Others would tell you they were swept away by a tsunami. Some might even simply have been thrown away. But rather than focus on their tragic state of being, and how they got that way, Kamoshita looks to the future; the revival. “I wanted to revive what wave have brought us,” she says. In fact, many of the shards have been polished by the waves and sand while all the while retaining their beautiful colors.

As a potter, Kamoshita was skilled in the ancient craft of kintsugi: “a Japanese traditional repairing technique used to connect broken pieces together with gold.” Using this method – intended to accentuate the cracks rather than hide them – the artist pieces together the broken ceramics she’s collected. The pink pieces, she explains, are her own broken ceramics, which she likens to the cherry blossoms that come back to life every Spring.

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Kamoshita received honorable mention in the 2016 Ronin | Globus Artist-in-Residence Program, for which Spoon & Tamago [Colossal’s sister site] was a judge. The ceramic pieces will be on display in the group exhibition “Contemporary Talents of Japan” from June 23 to July 30, 2016 at the Ronin Gallery in New York. (Syndicated from Spoon & Tamago)

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Artist Mimics Japanese ‘Kintsugi’ Technique to Repair Broken Vases with Embroidery 

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Brighton-based artist Charlotte Bailey was fascinated by the traditional Japanese mending technique called kintsugi, where a broken ceramic object is repaired with gold, silver or platinum, to accentuate the damage and ‘honor’ its history. In this interpretation, Bailey utilizes an embroidery method to reassemble a broken vase—a sort of hybrid between kintsugi and darning with a beautiful result. She first wraps each broken piece in fabric and then uses gold metallic thread to painstakingly patchwork the pieces together. While the process isn’t meant to make the vase functional again, it does produce a striking sculptural object. We’d love to see many more of these. You can follow more of her embroidery work on Facebook.

Update: Artist Zoe Hillyard has been using a similar technique to create ceramic patchwork since 2010.

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A 150-Year-Old Porcelain Warehouse in Japan Opens for Daily ‘Treasure Hunts’ for Just $45 

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The Kouraku Kiln was founded in Arita (Saga Prefecture, Japan) in 1865 and has been producing ceramics for the past 150 years. Over that time the facility has accumulated a vast collection of pottery that has, for one reason or another, gone unsold. The warehouse is so vast that some workers use a bicycle to get from one side to the other. And they’ll be the first to admit that even they don’t really know what’s in there. The production facility is now inviting visitors on a “treasure hunt” to try and get rid of some of their stock.

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Here’s how the treasure hunt works:

— Make your reservation by phone (they only allow 10 people per day)
— Show up at your designated time and select your course and pay: 5,000 yen or 10,000 yen (about $45 to $90)
— Get a 30-min tour of the facility
— Begin your 90-min treasure hunt. You’ll be given a pair of gloves, a flashlight and a basket. You can take home everything you fit in your basket.
— The more expensive course gives you access to a special section of decoratively painted ceramics but both allow you to take home as much as you can fit in your basket. Once done you’ll get to wrap everything up in newspaper so that nothing breaks on your way home.

It sounds like a really fun excursion! They even have an English-speaking staff on hand to assist foreigners.

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(Syndicated from Spoon & Tamago)

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