Tag Archives: Chicago

Moody Views of a Frigid Chicago Captured by Mike Meyers 

Chicago photographer Mike Meyers shot some amazing views of the windy city this winter, capturing unusual ice patterns on Lake Michigan, trains blasting through snow, and skyscrapers swallowed by clouds. Meyers shares more of his cityscape photography on his website and also sells a number of photos as prints. (via ARCHatlas)

See related posts on Colossal about , , .

The Shadowy Skyline of Chicago Towers Over Lake Michigan 

shadow-chicago

Last Friday afternoon, photographer Nick Ulivieri was on an aerial photoshoot for a client when the helicopter pilot took a long turn out over Lake Michigan so he could better capture the shadow of the Hancock Center. After reviewing his photos later he quickly realized the exaggerated autumn shadow of the skyline looked fantastic when he flipped the photo. The result is the image you see here. Ulivieri consistently takes some of the best photos of Chicago year-round, aerial or otherwise. Such as this, and this, and this. Well worth a follow.

See related posts on Colossal about , , , .

A Dramatic Roll Cloud Briefly Overtakes Chicago 

cloudy

Last night a cold front rolled through Chicago, and lucky for us art consultant Amy King was on the lakefront and stopped to shoot an amazing 5-second timelapse as a low-hanging roll cloud moved ominously down the shoreline. So, what’s a roll cloud? Meteorologist Cheryl Scott explains:

What is a Roll Cloud and how does it form? It’s a low, horizontal, tube-shaped cloud. It is formed by winds changing speed/direction when the air temperature reverses its state (resulting in warm air on top of cool air). The shear in the atmosphere sets up a rolling motion, think [of a] rolling pin used in a baking.

You can read a bit more about roll clouds—also called an Arcus Cloud—on Wikipedia. (via @kingartcollective)

A video posted by Colossal (@colossal) on

See related posts on Colossal about , , , .

Boiling Point by Paul Octavious 

boiling-point

Photographer Paul Octavious captured the above image using a drone in his Chicago neighborhood, editing the image with red marks in post production as a reaction to the hostile environment escalating both in the city and across the country. By using a drone to photograph the thermometer-like image Octavious was also able to capture the landscape surrounding his street intervention, adding a deeper context to his work by providing a glimpse of Chicago’s own streets.

“While photographing a street in my neighborhood from above, I immediately picked out the shape which resembled that of a classic glass thermometer,” said Octavious. “As I painted over the asphalt with red in post, it started to take on something more to me. With everything that’s going on right now in this country, and the violence happening on our streets, the boiling point is at an all-time high. I think while creating this, I had a few things on my mind.”

You can see more of Octavious’ work on his Instagram. (via This Isn’t Happiness)

See related posts on Colossal about , .

An Explosive New Mural and Paintings by Collin van der Sluijs 

collin-1

From the smallest details expressed on canvas to the cracked facade of a multi-story building, Dutch artist Collin van der Sluijs is comfortable investigating what he refers to as “personal pleasures and struggles in daily life.” Working without sketches or notes, the artist dives into each artwork with spray paint, acrylics, and ink as ideas take hold and images slowly emerge. He frequently examines themes of the natural world such as the cycle of life, the depictions of various species of birds, and the psychology of beings both human and animalistic.

Van der Sluijs was most recently in Chicago where he completed a tremendous mural in the south loop as part of the Wabash Arts Corridor that depicts two endangered Illinois birds amongst an explosion of blooms. He also opened his first solo show in the U.S. titled “Luctor Et Emergo” at Vertical Gallery, featuring a wide range of paintings and drawings. You can follow more of his work on Flickr.

collin-2

collin-3

collin-4

collin-7

collin-5

collin-6

See related posts on Colossal about , , , , , .

Page 1 of 141234...»