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Art

Paper-Cast Sculptures of Legs and Torsos Covered in Traditional Chinese Paintings by Peng Wei

January 10, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

Beijing-based artist Peng Wei places traditional Chinese painting on rice paper to create contemporary sculptures of human legs, shoes, and torsos. These paper-cast works display scenes of the natural and domestic, including lush gardens, animals, and interiors of Chinese homes. Peng has been troubled by the adoption of Western styles of clothing by Chinese women. By painting classical Chinese motifs on Western shoes and other fashion-related items, Peng aims to deny the decline of China’s cultural heritage to rapid globalization.

Peg was born in Chengdu in 1974 and graduated from the Eastern art department of Nankai University with a BA in Literature and an MA in Philosophy. Her works have been collected by the National Art Museum of China, the Hong Kong Museum of Art, the Asian Art Museum of San Francisco, the Guangdong Art Museum, and many more international collections. You can see more of Peng’s paintings and sculptures on Artsy. (via Lustik)

 

 



Art

Life-Size Cardboard Sculptures of Chinese Villagers Tap Into Artist Warren King’s Ancestral Heritage

December 31, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

Warren King began sculpting with cardboard as an attempt to add fantasy to the lives of his children, creatively crafting masks and helmets out of the recyclable material. This slowly evolved into a more time-consuming arts practice as King began focusing less time on costumes, and more time making large sculptures of his own. After a visit to his grandparents’ village in Shaoxing, China, the New York City-based artist felt compelled to more deeply connect with his cultural past. This sparked Grandfather’s Friend, and Arrival Times, a series of life-size cardboard recreations of his ancestors. 

“During my first visit to China about 7 years ago, I visited the village and spoke with residents who actually remembered my grandparents from over 50 years ago,” said King. “It was a pivotal experience for me, one that inspired me to become an artist. Through my work, I am attempting to understand the fragile connections to people and culture, and examine whether those connections, once broken, can be restored.”

King’s cardboard sculptures will be shown in the exhibition Art of Asia at the Peninsula Fine Arts Center from February 2 to March 28, 2018. You can see more of his work on his Instagram and Flickr.

 

 



Photography

Ultraviolet Break of Day: A Midnight Walk Through the Neon-Hued Streets of Asian Cities by Marcus Wendt

August 11, 2017

Christopher Jobson

While on a recent trip through Hong Kong, Shenzhen, and Seoul, London-based photographer Marcus Wendt found himself suffering from a bout of jetlag induced insomnia and ended up wandering the streets of several cities late at night. With a camera in-hand he captured these mesmerising shots that channel the cyberpunk vibe of movies like Bladerunner where narrow urban alleys are bathed in cool ultraviolet light. Over several days Wendt worked his way through the Kowloon area of Hong Kong and then Shenzhen’s Huaqiangbei area known for its sprawling electronics market, before eventually traveling to Seoul. You can see more from the project on his website. (via Colossal Submissions)

Seoul, South Korea

 

 



Design

The First Annual International Bamboo Architectural Biennale Explores Material’s Use in Contemporary Design

May 23, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

Youth Hostel / Design Hotel by Anna Heringer. All images via Julien Lanoo.

Last fall the very first International Bamboo Architecture Biennale premiered in the small village of Baoxi, China, placing eighteen permanent works by twelve international architects within the traditionally agriculture-centered town. The biennale, curated by artist Ge Qiantao and architect George Kunihiro, reveals how the traditional material can be incorporated into contemporary design. The plant serves as the base to new buildings in the village including a youth hostel and a ceramics museum, which Baoxi hopes to draw tourism to through supplementary infrastructures such as a visitors building, hotel, and learning center. (via My Modern Met)

Youth Hostel / Design Hotel by Anna Heringer.

Youth Hostel / Design Hotel by Anna Heringer.

Bridge by Ge Quantao.

Bridge by Ge Quantao.

Bamboo product research and design center (interior) by Li Xiaodong.

Bamboo product research and design center (interior) by Li Xiaodong.

Contemporary celadon ceramic museum by Kengo Kuma.

Contemporary celadon ceramic museum by Kengo Kuma.

Bamboo product research and design center (interior) by Li Xiaodong.

Bamboo product research and design center (interior) by Li Xiaodong.

Bamboo product research and design center (interior) by Li Xiaodong.

Bamboo product research and design center (interior) by Li Xiaodong.

Bridge by Ge Quantao.

Bridge by Ge Quantao.

Invited ceramist workshop by Keisuke Maeda.

 

 



Design

The Shaolin Flying Monks Temple Blasts Monks Into the Sky Above a Mountainside Amphitheater

March 13, 2017

Christopher Jobson

All photos by Ansis Starks, courtesy Mailitis Architects

Perched on the Songshan mountain in rural Henan, China, this new temple designed by Latvian architecture studio Mailītis Architects brings a whole new perspective to the legendary Shaolin monks: specifically an aerial perspective. The recently completed Shaolin Flying Monks Temple contains a one-of-a-kind levitation pavilion that houses a vertical wind tunnel designed in part by Aerodium that blasts participants toward the sky in the center of a 230-seat amphitheater.

“The concept is to tell the history of Zen and Kung-Fu through artistic performances and architectural image of the building itself,” says Mailītis. “It serves as a metaphor for mountain and trees and was inspired by Songshan mountain – the natural environment for monks to develop their skills.”

You can see more photos of the new landmark building on Mailītis Architects’ website. (via Dezeen)

 

 



Art

Drawings on Discarded Trash Left in Public Places by Artist Wenyi

September 2, 2016

Kate Sierzputowski

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Chinese artist Wenyi wanders the streets of his home in Dali, Yunnan Province, China, gathering bits of discarded cardboard to use as his canvas. Wenyi then takes the bits of trash he finds and draws the surroundings on each object. The small pieces range from quick black and white sketches to colorful drawings of entire homes, each a snapshot of his hometown. After sketching the scenery Wenyi places his completed works back into their original locations, imbuing the everyday refuse with art. “I want people to see art in our everyday life,” said Wenyi to Bored Panda, “even if it’s on wasted paper.” (via Booooooom, Bored Panda)

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Photography

Clouds, Rivers, and Mountains Converge in Breathtaking Landscapes of Guilin, China

May 25, 2016

Christopher Jobson

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Perched high atop the city of Guilin, China, photographer Kyon.J had an extraordinary view of the Li River as it winds through an unusually steep mountainscape. Early in the morning the area is often filled with fog or haze trapped in the mountains, certainly a dream scenario for any landscape photographer. You can see more of Kyon.J’s work in her portfolio where she also shares equally impressive photos of her native Japan.

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