cityscapes

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with cityscapes



Art Photography

The Neon Glow of Tokyo and London’s Nightlife Captured by Liam Wong

May 13, 2016

Kate Sierzputowski

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All images via @liamwon9

Art Director Liam Wong spends his days directing the visual identity of video games at Ubisoft, while his nights are spent exploring the neon-splashed streets of his city of Tokyo, and sometimes London. Wong places these images, that seem to mimic the appearance of a video game themselves, on Instagram. Here he has a huge archive that explores how the digital has embedded itself within the cities’ landscapes, meshing reality with flashing LED lights, scrolling messages, and neon signs. You can also see more of Wong’s imagery on his Facebook, and Society6 where you can buy his prints. (via My Modern Met)

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Art

New Oil-Based Cityscapes Set at Dawn and Dusk by Jeremy Mann

April 19, 2016

Kate Sierzputowski

"NYC #19, oil on panel, 30 x 30 inches, all images via Jeremy Mann

“NYC #19, oil on panel, 30 x 30 inches, all images via Jeremy Mann

Jeremy Mann (previously here and here) paints cityscapes set during the low-lit moments of the early morning or evening, just when natural light has begun to creep in or fade from a city’s car-lined streets. Using oil paints, Mann applies and wipes away areas of the canvas to recreate these hazy environments, adding layers of paint back on top of the slightly smeared works with more detailed strokes. This layered effects makes the works appear like double exposed images, two scenes gently blurring into one.

Mann’s work will be featured in an upcoming June 3 exhibition at John Pence Gallery in San Francisco which will run through July 9, 2016. You can view more of his cityscapes on his Instagram and Facebook.

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“Market St., Midnight” (2016), oil on panel, 36 x 36 inches

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“The Geary St. Storm” (2016), oil on panel, 48 x 48 inches

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“Cityscape – Composed Form Study 13,” oil on panel, 6 x 6 in.

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“NYC #20,” oil on panel, 48 x 48 inches.

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“NYC #22,” oil on panel, 36 x 36 inches

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“Morning Downpour on Market Street” (2016), oil on panel, 25 x 25 inches

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Photography

Cinematic Photographs of Tokyo at Night by Masashi Wakui

January 21, 2016

Christopher Jobson

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All photos © Masashi Wakui

Tokyo is an infinitely photogenic city. And there’s no shortage of photographers capturing its vibrant landscape. But local resident and photography aficionado Masashi Wakui has a unique, surreal style of capturing Tokyo by night and making it look like an animated still from Akira or a Ghibli film.

Wakui has a penchant for the backstreets of Tokyo, specifically those with plenty of lanterns, streetlights and neon signs that only add to the surreal, cinematic quality of the scene. And those who have spent any number of nights wandering these streets will find Wakui’s photos achingly captivating.

Once the scene is captured Wakui then digitally manipulates the image, giving it a color grading effect that works perfectly with his busy nighttime cityscapes. There are tutorials that have even sprouted up, analyzing the “Masashi Wakui Look,” as its been coined. Wakui himself even points to one, admitting it’s close but not perfect.

You can see many more of Wakui’s photos on Flickr, where he constantly posts new work. (syndicated from Spoon & Tamago)

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Photography

Futuristic Views of London Shot From a Helicopter at Night by Vincent Laforet

May 22, 2015

Christopher Jobson

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Earlier this month, photographer Vincent Laforet spent two hours in a helicopter at 6,000 feet above London to capture these surprisingly futuristic aerial views of the sprawling metropolis. The photographer’s approach to image processing and perspective creates electrified cityscapes that look like something right out of a scene from Tron or Blade Runner. But perhaps the most significant aspect of the shots is the attention to color and light. Laforet discusses this a bit on Storehouse:

Big Ben is a wonderful example of the different types of lights and their color temperatures due to the older yellow (sodium vapor) and the green (fluorescent) mixed in with magenta (fluorescent) and white daylight balanced LED lights. I find this to be one of the most fascinating aspects of this AIR project: had we shot it just a few years ago, you’d have see much more monochromatic (mostly yellow) lighting throughout the cities … It would simply not be the same and not nearly as visually appealing.

This new series of London photos is part of an ongoing project and soon-to-be book by called Air, featuring similar aerial photos of Las Vegas, Los Angeles, New York, and San Francisco. Laforet will continue to travel around Europe over the next few weeks with stops in Paris and Berlin. You can see many more photos and read a detailed account of the London photoshoot on Storehouse. The entire Air Series in Europe is sponsored by G-Technology. (via Sploid)

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Photography

Chicago in the Fog by Michael Salisbury

September 12, 2014

Christopher Jobson

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Local photographer Michael Salisbury snapped some excellent photos of the fog swallowing Chicago this summer. You can see more over on his Flickr stream and on Instagram.

 

 



Photography

Photos of Hong Kong Construction Sites Wrapped in Colorful Cocoons by Peter Steinhauer

May 15, 2014

Johnny Strategy

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Like a burst of color on an otherwise grey canvas, a single majestically colored building rises out of a sea of dull grayness. This is not Christo’s latest “wrapping” project, which is what the photographer Peter Steinhaur first thought, naturally, upon encountering the phenomenon. In fact, these are construction sites wrapped in a colorful mesh material, a traditional method employed in Hong Kong to prevent debris from falling onto the streets below. According to Steinhauer, who’s lived and worked in Asia for the last 21 years – but was stunned to discover this unique construction method in Hong Kong – buildings are wrapped regardless of whether they’re coming up or going down. I’ve seen a similar method employed in Japan with smaller houses, but never anything of such monolithic scale. You can see many more photos over on Steinhauer’s site, where he has two series aptly titled “Cocoon.” (via Featureshoot)

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Art

New Blurred Cityscapes by Valerio D’Ospina

April 28, 2014

Christopher Jobson

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Cattedrale di Milano (2014). Oil on canvas, 40 x 40in.

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Manhattan (2013). Oil on panel, 35 x 48in.

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Driving on Madison Avenue (2013). Oil on panel, 48 x 24in.

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Broadway and West 25th (2013). Oil on panel, 24 x 16.5in.

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Duomo di Milano (2012) Oil on linen, 39 x 56in. / Facade (2012). Oil on panel, 24 x 30in.

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Bivio (2011). Oil on panel, 40 x 24in.

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La Strada (2014). Oil on panel, 48 x 40in.

It’s hard not to get lost in these dramatically blurred architectural renderings and cityscapes of New York and Italy by Italian painter Valerio D’Ospina (previously). The Pennsylvania-based artist most recently had a show last year at Mason Murer, and you can now follow him on Facebook and Instagram. (This Isn’t Happiness)