Tag Archives: collage

New Classical Paintings Reimagined as Part of Modern-Day Italian Life by Alexey Kondakov 

For his latest works in the ongoing series Art History in Contemporary Life, Ukrainian artist and designer Alexey Kondakov (previously here and here) has staged classical paintings in scenes from modern day Naples, Italy. The figures effortless merge with their present day surroundings, two women looking perfectly bored flipping through comic books in the back of a dusty book store, while a different woman takes a nap beside a latte and half-eaten sandwich. You can view more of his digitally altered scenes on his Instagram and Facebook page. (via My Modern Met)

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Photomontages That Trace Light Through Overgrown Countrysides and Abandoned Interiors 

"Thicket" (2015)

“Thicket” (2015), all images © Suzanne Moxhay

Artist Suzanne Moxhay produces photomontage scenes which seem to effortlessly combine elements from both her own photography practice and her large archive of collected images. To compose her taken and collected photographs, Moxhay relies on a film technique dating back to the early 20th century called matte painting, a process where backdrops are illustrated on glass panels and integrated into live-action sets. Using this method she creates the illusion that all of her disparate pictures are one cohesive image, first arranging the fragments on glass, then re-photographing the new configuration, and finally touching up the compositions digitally.

“In my recent work I have been exploring concepts of spatial containment in montages built from fragments of photographed and painted interiors,” says Moxhay. “Architectures are disrupted by anomalous elements – contradictory light sources, faulty perspective, paradoxes of scale. Light casts shadows in the wrong direction, walls fail to meet in corners, an area of the image can be seen either as an enclosing wall or dark overcast sky.”

Moxhay lives and works in London. You can see more of her photomontage scenes on her website. (via ArtistADay)

Eventide (2012)

“Eventide” (2012)

"Arch" (2016)

“Arch” (2016)

"Antechamber" (2014)

“Antechamber” (2014)

"Feralis" (2011)

“Feralis” (2011)

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New #ComboPhoto Mashups from Stephen McMennamy 

Atlanta-based photographer and art director Stephen McMennamy (previously) continues his humorous split-image photo juxtapositions that he refers to as #combophotos. It would be easy enough to sort through countless images on the web to find unusual ways to overlap images, however McMennamy dramatically elevates the quality of his work by utilizing his original photography. In this way, he’s able to perfectly execute the ideas in his head, creating objects, scenes, and hilarious creatures that matchup almost seamlessly. One exception: for a recent elephant/tree mashup McMennamy relied on a photo by Zimbabwe-based photographer Jez Bennett.

You can follow more of McMennamy’s recent work on Instagram and some of his best #combophotos are available as prints.

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A Surreal Three-Dimensional World Encased in Layers of Glass by Dustin Yellin 

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Installation view, courtesy GRIMM Gallery.

Dustin Yellin‘s latest installation (previously here and here) is more of an encased world than environment—ten modular glass blocks that together measure 20 feet long. Densely layered, each glass brick contains thousands of images meticulously sourced from magazines and books, arranged to created Yellin’s own alternate National Geographic universe. The pieces, which differ in dimension at the ends of the work and are uniformly sized near the middle, all contribute to a larger, and perhaps forecasted, story of war and peril. Not a pleasant look at the future of humanity, Yellin outlines scenes of greed and global warming, literally showing the fall of humanity from the tip of a glass-encased mountain to the depths of a turbulent sea.

This installation, titled Ten Parts, is part of a solo exhibition of Yellin’s work by the same name at GRIMM Gallery in Amsterdam which opens this Friday, November 25, and runs through January 7, 2017.

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Installation view, courtesy GRIMM Gallery.

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Installation view, courtesy GRIMM Gallery.

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Salvador Dali’s Rare Surrealist Cookbook Republished for the First Time in over 40 Years 

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Published only once in 1973, Les Diners de Gala was a dream fulfilled for surrealist artist Salvador Dali who claimed at the age of 6 that he wanted to be a chef. The bizarro cookbook pairs 136 recipes over 12 chapters (the 10th of which is dedicated to aphrodisiacs) with the his exceptionally strange illustrations and collages created especially for the publication. The artworks depict towering mountains of crayfish with unsettling overtones of cannibalism, an unusual meeting of a swan and a toothbrush in a pastry case, and portraits of Dali himself mingling with chefs against decadent place settings. Recipes include such delicacies as “Thousand Year Old Eggs”, “Veal Cutlets Stuffed With Snails”, “Frog Pasties”, and “Toffee with Pine Cones”.

Dali is widely known for his opulent dinner parties thrown with his wife Gala, events that were almost more theatrical than gustatory. Guests, many of the celebrities, were required to wear completely outlandish costumes and an accompaniment of wild animals often roamed free around the dinner table. Despite the unusual ingredients and preparation methods, many of the old school recipes in Les Diners de Gala originated in some of the top restaurants in Paris at the time including Lasserre, La Tour d’Argent, Maxim’s, and Le Train Bleu. Lest you think anything in the book might be remotely healthy, it offers a cautionary disclaimer at the outset:

We would like to state clearly that, beginning with the very first recipes, Les Diners de Gala, with its precepts and its illustrations, is uniquely devoted to the pleasures of Taste. Don’t look for dietetic formulas here.

We intend to ignore those charts and tables in which chemistry takes the place of gastronomy. If you are a disciple of one of those calorie-counters who turn the joys of eating into a form of punishment, close this book at once; it is too lively, too aggressive, and far too impertinent for you.

Only around 400 copies of Les Diners de Gala are known to survive, most of which sell for hundreds of dollars. However Taschen has finally made this rare book available for the first time in 43 years as a new reprint currently available for pre-order. If this whets your Dali appetite, don’t miss the 150th anniversary edition of his 1969 illustrations for Alice in Wonderland. (via Brain Pickings, It’s Nice That)

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Buildings Shaped Like Letters of the Alphabet Made with Photographic Collage by Lola Dupre 

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As part of a personal project exploring typography, artist Lola Dupre (previously) imagined a series of unusual structures shaped like letters of the alphabet. The artist utilized her well-known collage technique that incorporates existing photographs that are cut into tiny pieces, often in duplicate, to make each building. Dupre recently started an Instagram account where you can see some of her latest completed works. (via Soft Shock)

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