collage

Posts tagged
with collage



Art Food History

The Wines of Gala: Salvador Dalí’s Surrealist Wine Guide Republished for the First Time in 40 Years

November 2, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

Last published in 1978, The Wines of Gala is Salvador Dalí’s eccentric guide to wine grapes and their origin. Filled with over 140 appropriated artworks and collages collected and created by Dalí, the book is an equally surreal follow-up to TASCHEN’s reprinting of the artist’s cookbook Les Diners de Gala. In addition to Jean-François Millet’s The Angelus, which was a constant point of reference in Dali’s works, visuals include a Bacchus-like kitten, and a sort of tableau vivant featuring Dali himself.

In keeping with Dalí’s efforts to create artwork based on his emotions, memories, and dreams, the artist chose to organize the wines in the book by how they influenced his mood. The groupings are appropriately imaginative classifications including such section titles as “Wines of Frivolity,” “Wines of the Impossible,” and “Wines of Light.” A section in the book also outlines Dalí’s method of ordering wine by emotional experience, quoting the artist’s famous credo: “A real connoisseur does not drink wine but tastes of its secrets.”

The 296-page wine bible published by TASCHEN is now available for pre-order. (via It’s Nice That)

 

 

 



Art Photography

Artist Yang Yongliang Imagines the Bleak Effects of Industrialization in Dense Photographic Collages

November 1, 2017

Christopher Jobson

Yang Yongliang, Endless Streams, 2017. Single Channel 4K video, 7’00”, © Yang Yongliang / Courtesy Galerie Paris-Beijing

In these stark photographic collages that seem to possess the infinite density of a fractal, artist Yang Yongliang (previously) questions unchecked industrialization, the impact of climate change, and pressing social issues in his native China. Each image seems to suggest a post-apocalyptic future where the forces of urbanization collide with the natural world, creating a drab black and white dystopia. “The artist keeps developing a critic approach to reality while searching for a spiritual source in his country’s relentless march between technological progress and annihilation,” states Galerie Paris-Beijing.

As part of this new series titled Time Immemorial, Yongliang began with a series of digital collages that were printed in negative on fine art paper. Each piece was then photographed with a traditional film camera and prints were developed by hand. Lastly, the artworks are mounted on back-lit wooden cases to fulfill the artist’s intent to preserve digital imagery on photographic film.

Time Immemorial opens at Galerie Paris-Beijing on November 4, 2017.

Sinking, 2016. Giclee print on Fine Art paper, 100 x 80 cm

Flooding, 2016. Giclee print on Fine Art paper, 80 x 100 cm

The Cliff, 2016. Giclee print on Fine Art paper, 80 x 80 cm

The Path, 2016. Giclee print on Fine Art paper, 80 x 80 cm

The Streams, 2016. Giclee print on Fine Art paper, 100 x 80 cm

The Flock, 2016. Giclee print on Fine Art paper, 80 x 100 cm

 

 



Art

Surreal Architectural Collages That Float Above Serene Landscapes by Matthias Jung

October 26, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

Artist and designer Matthias Jung (previously here and here) collages unique elements of architecture to create imaginary homes set in isolated landscapes. The works float above environments on the outskirts of civilization, appearing like a mirage above rolling plains or an arctic glacier.

The details Jung chooses for his compositions are selected based on the feelings they elicit. For example, the German designer might select latticed windows to convey a sense of coziness in a work, while including concrete to provoke a certain coldness. When combined, the homes serve as short poems, collaged emotions packaged into surreal structures.

Jung began the series of houses in early January 2015. You can view more of his past architectural collages by visiting his website gallery here.

 

 



Animation

Paper Trail: An Animated Collage by Jake Fried

October 13, 2017

Christopher Jobson

Animator Jake Fried (previously) is known for his hand-drawn ink and white-out films that incorporate dense imagery and symbolism across a rapidly changing field of view, all photographed frame by frame through nearly 1,500 layers. His latest piece, Paper Trail, introduces a collage-like feel through a lovely layering technique. You can see many more of his films on Vimeo.

 

 



Photography

The Serendipitous Clouds and Faux Reflections of Photographer Kanghee Kim

July 12, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

Photographer Kanghee Kim juxtaposes day-to-day moments to create scenes that peek into an alternate world, subtly placing faux reflections in coils of cable or in the streak of a rear windshield. The Brooklyn-based photographer’s manipulations come from the desire to manifest magical moments in the mundane, using post-production edits as an additional artistic medium within her work.

“I started to think of [my photography] as a painting and allow the post-production process to act as a kind of mark-making,” said Kanghee to i-D. “Photoshop is widely used in commercial photography to refine the details and make the images look flawless.”

Kanghee decided that she wanted to do the opposite with the tool, keeping the flaws that appeared in her images rather than editing them out. The works’ small imperfections highlight the human quality of each combined moment rather than glossing over it. You can view more of the photographer’s softly edited images and unexpected reflections on her website and Instagram. (via This Isn’t Happiness)

 

 



Art Illustration

Elongated Female Figures Composed From Elements of Natural and Urban Scenery by Johanna Goodman

June 21, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

Taller than trees and towering over buildings, Johanna Goodman‘s pieced together female forms appear to stretch far above the landscapes before them. The collaged works, which combine elements of art, design, and architecture, are a part Goodman’s series titled The Catalogue of Imaginary Beings, which aims to explore the individual’s role in history and popular culture.

“[The Catalogue of Imaginary Beings] draws its inspiration from a wide spectrum of sources—including magical realism, surrealism and symbolism—and more specifically references such cultural artifacts as talismans, idols, totems and all of the material detritus that surrounds all of us all the time,” Goodman told Ms. “These characters are composites embodying notions of ‘the warrior,’ vulnerability, industry, the universal and the personal. They reference these identities as they’ve been depicted historically through art, literature and commerce.”

Recently Goodman has created works that commemorate the strong women involved in the Women’s March on Washington and its sister marches across the globe. She has also created work inspired by the Climate March that occurred this past April (like the figure seen erupting from a smoke stack below). You can view more of Goodman’s elongated collages on her Instagram and Tumblr. (via Tu Recepcja)

 

 



Art Photography

New Flying Houses Hover Above Paris by Laurent Chéhère

March 27, 2017

Christopher Jobson

As part of his ongoing series titled Flying Houses, French artist Laurent Chéhère (previously) imagines a world without gravity where unusual architectural structures seem to float midair, tethered only by loose strands of power lines. Each house seems dense with details, telling the story of fictional inhabitants through purposeful details that allude to much deeper stories behind each image. Chéhère draws influence from Jules Verne to Hayao Miyazaki, but most poignantly brings attention to marginalized communities found in Paris, specifically Gypsies and immigrants. By uprooting the houses he hopes the viewer focuses more clearly on them, an act he refers to as “releasing them from the anonymity of the street.”

Each house is actually an extremely detailed photomontage and begins life as a series of sketches. Chéhère then photographs hundreds of elements like antennas, walls, roofs, graffiti, and birds which he then assembles digitally into the pieces you see here.

Several recent artworks by Chéhère are currently on view at Muriel Guepin Gallery in New York along with miniature buildings by Joshua Smith. You can see more of his photographic work on Instagram.