Tag Archives: collage

Artist Alexey Kondakov Imagines Figures from Classical Paintings as Part of Contemporary Life

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For his ongoing series “Art History in Contemporary Life,” Ukrainian artist Alexey Kondakov takes scenes and figures lifted from classical paintings and drops them into modern-day life. Bouguereau’s Song of the Angels appears to take place on an empty subway car while a pair of men from Holbein’s famous The Ambassadors are transported to the table of a seedy bar. Much like Etienne Lavie’s billboard series and Julien de Casabianca’s recent Outings Project, the series creates an interesting and playful new context for artworks usually only encountered in museums and art history books. You can see more over on Facebook. (via Supersonic)

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Lola Dupré’s Fragmented Photograph Collages Appear as Funhouse Mirror Reflections

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Heavily influenced by the Dada aesthetic, Lola Dupré’s surreal collages bend and expand the traditional view of both object and human form. With a wide focus of subject matter it seems as if no human or animal can escape Dupré’s focus, her subjects ranging from famous presidents and celebrities to giraffes and hound dogs.

Each work includes some sort of distortion to the original image, either by the artist multiplying limbs or elongating torsos and faces into unnatural poses. Although the work appears digitally manipulated, the collage artist and illustrator uses paper and scissors as her medium, utilizing thousands of paper paper shards to produce her funhouse-like imagery.

Since 2000 Dupré has lived and worked in multiple countries, creating her detailed collages in countries such as Scotland, Switzerland, France, Portugal, and Spain. Currently the artist is located in Limerick, Ireland and is represented by Los Angeles-based CES Gallery. More of Dupré’s eerie work can be found on her Tumblr and Facebook page.

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Sweeping Lace Patterns Cut into Dense Collages of Newspaper Covers by Myriam Dion

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Vendredi 24 janvier, Tragédie de Isle-Verte, 2014. Newspapers cut with x-acto knife, collage. 57 x 56 in. (144.78 x 142.24 cm). Photo courtesy the artist and Division Gallery.

Starting with daily covers of the Financial Times, the Gazette, or the New York Times, Montreal-based paper artist Myriam Dion (previously) cuts sweeping lace-like patterns into collages of newsprint. In earlier artworks Dion left newspaper covers intact while delicately cutting her patterns with an X-ACTO knife, but in recent pieces she’s also incorporated collage. Sometimes multiple covers are cut to create repeating patterns or text is overlaid with photographs. The fragile collages are usually titled after each individual newspaper’s date and primary subject, a strange juxtaposition given the beauty conveyed in her patterns can be at odds with the content: “Thursday April 17, South Korean Ferry Disaster“. Via Division Gallery:

At a period in history where printed news faces extinction, Myriam Dion’s intricate newspaper cut-outs explore the intersection between folk traditions and popular culture. Crafting thoughtful mosaics out of world events, she questions our appetite for sound-bite news and sensational art, showing us the quiet power of a patient hand and an inquisitive eye.

Dion had her first solo exhibition at Division Gallery earlier this year which also represented the final project of her master’s degree from the Université du Québec à Montréal. You can see more in her portfolio and at Division Gallery.

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Monday October 20, Blessed Pope, 2015. Newspapers cut with x-acto knife, collage. 19 5/8 x 11 3/8 in. (50 x 29 cm). Photo courtesy the artist and Division Gallery.

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Thursday April 17, South Korean Ferry Disaster, 2015. Newspapers cut with x-acto knife, collage. 36 1/4 x 22 7/8 in. (92 x 58 cm). Photo courtesy the artist and Division Gallery.

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Vendredi 24 janvier, Tragédie de Isle-Verte, 2014. Newspapers cut with x-acto knife, collage. 57 x 56 in. (144.78 x 142.24 cm). Photo courtesy the artist and Division Gallery.

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Saturday, May 31st, Slow Down, 2014, 31″ × 31″, Newspapers cut with exacto knife. Photo courtesy the artist and Division Gallery.

dion-11Le Parisien, 1945 / Le Devoir, 100 ans après, 2014, 26″ × 24″, Newspapers cut with exacto knife. Photo courtesy the artist and Division Gallery.

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Unusually Beautiful Architectural Collages by Matthias Jung

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German graphic artist Matthias Jung creates collages of fictional structures that seemingly turn the logic of architecture upside down. Buildings sprout mountains populated by livestock, homes hover in mid-air, and contrasting architectural styles are fused together in strangely harmonious ways like something straight out of a Terry Gilliam movie. You can see more of Jung’s work on his website where he also has a number of prints available. (via iGNANT)

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New Three-Dimensional Figurative Collages Encased in Multiple Layers of Glass by Dustin Yellin

Photo by Andrew Romer Photography courtesy the artist

Photo by Andrew Romer Photography courtesy the artist

The Brooklyn-based artist Dustin Yellin (previously) was commissioned by the New York City Ballet to install a new series of his figurative collages. The artist refers to the sculptures as Psychogeographies because “they feel like maps of the psyche.”

Each large-scale sculpture is individually embellished with bizarre found objects—cut-up books, magazines and trash found on the street—which are then sealed within layers of glass. “Imagine if you were to make a drawing on a window,” said Yellin, explaining his process. “And then you were to take another window and glue it to that window… until you had a window sandwich. I make window sandwiches.”

The resulting forms resemble dancers striking various poses: their multi-dimensional bodies encapsulated in suspended animation. A grand total of 15 of these “window sandwiches,” each weighing in at 3,000 pounds each, were installed in the atrium of the David H. Koch Theater at Lincoln Center. The installation is on view for all performances through March 1, 2015 but there’s also free public viewing through February 22. If you can’t make it you can always follow Yellin’s activities on Instagram.

Photo by David Deng courtesy the artist

Photo by David Deng courtesy the artist

Photo by Andrew Romer Photography courtesy the artist

Photo by Andrew Romer Photography courtesy the artist

Photo by Andrew Romer Photography courtesy the artist

Photo by Andrew Romer Photography courtesy the artist

Photo by David Deng courtesy the artist

Photo by David Deng courtesy the artist

Photo by David Deng courtesy the artist

Photo by David Deng courtesy the artist

Photo by David Deng courtesy the artist

Photo by David Deng courtesy the artist

Photo by David Deng courtesy the artist

Photo by David Deng courtesy the artist

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Sinister Architecture Constructed from Archival Library of Congress Images by Jim Kazanjian

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Inspired in part by the classic horror literature of H.P. Lovecraft, artist Jim Kazanjian (previously) assembles foreboding buildings using snippets of photographs found in the Library of Congress archives. Equal parts secret lair, insane asylum, and the work of a deranged architect, Kazanjian’s collages are created from 50-70 separate photographs taken over the last century. Each piece takes nearly three months to complete as he painstakingly searches for just the right elements, a process he likens to “solving a puzzle, except in reverse.” From his artist statement:

I’ve chosen photography as a medium because of the cultural misunderstanding that it has a sort of built-in objectivity. This allows me to set up a visual tension within the work, to make it resonate and lure the viewer further inside. My current series is inspired by the classic horror literature of H.P. Lovecraft, Algernon Blackwood and similar authors. I am intrigued with the narrative archetypes these writers utilize to transform the commonplace into something sinister and foreboding. In my work, I prefer to use these devices as a means to generate entry points for the viewer. I’m interested in occupying a space where the mundane intersects the strange, and the familiar becomes alien. In a sense, I am attempting to render the sublime.

You can see much more of Kazanjian’s work on his website, and at Jennifer Kostuik Gallery in Vancouver later this year. (via Colossal Submissions)

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Surreal Collages by Eugenia Loli

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Collage artist Eugenia Loli uses photography scanned from vintage magazines and science publications to create bizarre visual narratives that borrow from aspects of pop art, dada, and traditional surrealism. Loli’s background is almost as diverse as the imagery she employs, having been born in Greece and living in Germany and the UK before settling in California. She previously worked as a nurse, a computer programmer, and as a technology journalist, but has only recently found a calling in collage work with publication in numerous magazines since 2013.

Loli gives much of her work away as high-resolution files which you can download and print directly from hrt Flickr account for personal usage. She also has a collection of official, signed art prints available here. (via Asylum Art, iGNANT)

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