Tag Archives: collage

Elongated Female Figures Composed From Elements of Natural and Urban Scenery by Johanna Goodman 

Taller than trees and towering over buildings, Johanna Goodman's pieced together female forms appear to stretch far above the landscapes before them. The collaged works, which combine elements of art, design, and architecture, are a part Goodman’s series titled The Catalogue of Imaginary Beings, which aims to explore the individual’s role in history and popular culture.

“[The Catalogue of Imaginary Beings] draws its inspiration from a wide spectrum of sources—including magical realism, surrealism and symbolism—and more specifically references such cultural artifacts as talismans, idols, totems and all of the material detritus that surrounds all of us all the time,” Goodman told Ms. “These characters are composites embodying notions of ‘the warrior,’ vulnerability, industry, the universal and the personal. They reference these identities as they’ve been depicted historically through art, literature and commerce.”

Recently Goodman has created works that commemorate the strong women involved in the Women’s March on Washington and its sister marches across the globe. She has also created work inspired by the Climate March that occurred this past April (like the figure seen erupting from a smoke stack below). You can view more of Goodman’s elongated collages on her Instagram and Tumblr. (via Tu Recepcja)

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New Flying Houses Hover Above Paris by Laurent Chéhère 

As part of his ongoing series titled Flying Houses, French artist Laurent Chéhère (previously) imagines a world without gravity where unusual architectural structures seem to float midair, tethered only by loose strands of power lines. Each house seems dense with details, telling the story of fictional inhabitants through purposeful details that allude to much deeper stories behind each image. Chéhère draws influence from Jules Verne to Hayao Miyazaki, but most poignantly brings attention to marginalized communities found in Paris, specifically Gypsies and immigrants. By uprooting the houses he hopes the viewer focuses more clearly on them, an act he refers to as “releasing them from the anonymity of the street.”

Each house is actually an extremely detailed photomontage and begins life as a series of sketches. Chéhère then photographs hundreds of elements like antennas, walls, roofs, graffiti, and birds which he then assembles digitally into the pieces you see here.

Several recent artworks by Chéhère are currently on view at Muriel Guepin Gallery in New York along with miniature buildings by Joshua Smith. You can see more of his photographic work on Instagram.

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Digital Photo Collages of Dreamlike Scenes by Hüseyin Sahin 

Turkish art director and visual artist Hüseyin Şahin has an uncanny eye for combining disparate photographs into cohesive scenes, where technology, nature, and humankind collide. Sahin works with a variety of digital photographs which he then edits into collages that he shares on Instagram and Behance. (via ARCHatlas)

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Abstracted Alterations to The New York Times’ Front Pages by Fred Tomaselli 

“Sunday, October 4, 2009” (2016) Acrylic and ink on paper. 72 1/4 x 43 in. (183.5 x 109.2 cm) Photo © White Cube (Max Yawney)

Since 2005, artist Fred Tomaselli has been altering the front page of The New York Times, highlighting the day’s catastrophes and nightmares with layered collages and detailed paintings. The series, simply titled The Times, focuses on the tactility of newsprint in a hyper-digital society, as well as the absurdity our contemporary political climate.

The displayed works are large-scale reproductions of the paper’s front page, each titled based on the date of which the original newspaper was published. Tomaselli views these artistic interventions as abstract editorials, just another decision made in the production of the news and its byproducts.

Tomaselli’s works will be featured in the solo exhibition Paper at White Cube gallery in London opening March 17. The exhibition will continue through May 13, 2017. (via Creative Boom)

“Wednesday, July 23, 2014” (2016), acrylic and photo collage over archival inkjet print, 43 x 47 1/2 in. (109.2 x 120.7 cm) © Fred Tomaselli. Photo © White Cube (Max Yawney)

“Wednesday, March 4, 2015” (2016), acrylic, photo collage and leaves over archival inkjet print, 50 3/4 x 81 3/4 in. (128.9 x 207.6 cm) © Fred Tomaselli. Photo © White Cube (Max Yawney)

“Thursday, May 12, 2011” (2016), acrylic over archival digital print, 43 x 54 in. (109.2 x 137.2 cm), 56 x 67 x 2 in. (142.2 x 170.2 x 5.1 cm) (framed) © Fred Tomaselli. Photo © White Cube (Max Yawney)

“Thursday, Feb. 27, 2014” (2016), acrylic over archival inkjet print, 43 x 59 3/4 in. (109.2 x 151.8 cm) © Fred Tomaselli. Photo © White Cube (Max Yawney)

“Thursday, April 2, 2015” (2016), acrylic over archival inkjet print, 72 1/4 x 43 in. (183.5 x 109.2 cm) © Fred Tomaselli. Photo © White Cube (Max Yawney)

“Bloom (Dec. 17)” (2017), acrylic and ink on paper, 44 x 65 1/2 in. (111.8 x 166.4 cm), 52 3/4 x 74 1/4 x 2 1/2 in. (134 x 188.6 x 6.4 cm) (framed) © Fred Tomaselli. Photo © White Cube (Max Yawney)

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Flatland II: A New Series of Dramatically Skewed Photographic Landscapes by Aydin Büyüktas 

Turkish digital artist and photographer Aydin Büyüktas continues his dizzying landscape series Flatland with this new collection of collages shot in various locations around the United States including Texas, Arizona, New Mexico, and California. Each image requires around 18-20 aerial drone shots which are then stitched together digitally to form sweeping landscapes that curl upward without a visible horizon. As we’ve noted before, Büyüktas found inspiration in a century-old satirical novel titled Flatland about a two-dimensional world inhabited by geometric figures. You can see more from the series on his Facebook page.

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New Classical Paintings Reimagined as Part of Modern-Day Italian Life by Alexey Kondakov 

For his latest works in the ongoing series Art History in Contemporary Life, Ukrainian artist and designer Alexey Kondakov (previously here and here) has staged classical paintings in scenes from modern day Naples, Italy. The figures effortless merge with their present day surroundings, two women looking perfectly bored flipping through comic books in the back of a dusty book store, while a different woman takes a nap beside a latte and half-eaten sandwich. You can view more of his digitally altered scenes on his Instagram and Facebook page. (via My Modern Met)

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