Tag Archives: collage

Expedition: Surreal Landscapes Composed from Hundreds of Photographs by Catherine Nelson

ApproachingStorm
Approaching Storm

ApproachingStormDetail
Approaching Storm, detail

Gully
Gully

Lost
Lost

lost-detail
Lost, detail

Pond
Pond

pond-detail
Pond, detail

Waterhole
Waterhole

Waterhole_detail2
Waterhole, detail

Belgium-based artist Catherine Nelson (previously) just unveiled a new series of works titled Expedition. The digitally “painted” collages are made from hundreds upon hundreds of photographs that Nelson meticulously assembles into sprawling worlds that straddle the line between real and imagined. The five pieces you see here were nearly 10 months in the making.

Unlike her previous collages that resemble tiny planets, the pieces from Expedition subvert traditional landscapes with a horizon and single vanishing point and instead seem to sprawl in every direction, as if being viewed from multiple vantage points at once. Each landscape is quite large, measuring 60″ tall by up to 115″ wide and is rich with details like hidden snakes, bats and lizards, all elements influenced by Nelson’s memories of her natural surroundings growing up along the east coast of Australia.

Nelson will soon have work at the Head On Photo Festival in Sydney this May with Michael Reid Gallery and a solo show in August at Gallerysmith in Melbourne.

See related posts on Colossal about , , .

Dutch Paintings Recreated Using Thousands of Photographic and Scientific Specimens

mapes-1
Dutch specimen MT1639, 2013. 28″w x 34″ h x 3.5″ d. Photographic prints, insect pins, pinning foam, gelatin capsules, glass vials, painted canvas, cast resin, pill organizer, plastic specimen bags, cotton thread, costume jewelry, sequins.

mapes-2
Dutch specimen MT1639, detail.

mapes-3
Dutch specimen MT1639, detail.

mapes-4
Dutch female specimen: J, 2013. 28″w x 34″ h x 3.5″ d. Photographic prints, insect pins, pinning foam, gelatin capsules, glass vials, test tubes, paint samples, cast resin, magnifying boxes, plastic specimen bags, cotton thread.

mapes-5
Dutch female specimen: J, detail.

mapes-6
Case no. 1627, female-Dutch, 2013. 29″w x 13″ h x 3″ d. Photographic prints, insect pins, pinning foam, gelatin capsules, glass vials, optometrist lens, paint samples, modeling clay, dried botanical matter, fabric, magnifying box, plastic specimen bags, cotton thread.

mapes-7
Case no. 1627, detail.

mapes-8
Case no. 1627, detail.

With hundreds of tiny photographic fragments, gelatin capsules, magnifiers, plastic bags and insect pins, New York artist Michael Mapes (previously) creates collages that are equal parts portraiture and scientific specimen. For his latest works Mapes used photographs of paintings by Dutch masters Rembrandt, Nicolaes Eliasz Pickenoy and others as inspiration for large scale specimen boxes. The deconstructed photos along with myriad other materials have effectively been transformed into a collage of a painting of a person. Of the work Mapes shares:

The samples are part of my most recent series of work examining Dutch Master Portraiture. In this work, I deconstruct the original subject, in both a figurative and literal sense by dissecting photos of a painting and considering ways in which the parts might serve to inspire new parts within the reconstruction to suggest unique and complex meanings. I’ve done these works with the use of a visual metaphor suggesting a pseudoscientific method specifically working with materials and processes signifying entomological, biological and forensic science.

Three of these works will be on view as part of an exhibition titled ‘Face to Face’ at the Yellowstone Art Museum in Montana starting March 20, 214. (via Juxtapoz, Designboom)

See related posts on Colossal about , , .

The Surreal Collages of Joseba Elorza

joseba-1

joseba-2

joseba-3

joseba-4

joseba-5

joseba-6

joseba-7

joseba-8

Joseba Elorza is a sound technician who makes a living with his unique brand of digital collage and illustration. The Spain-based artist blends humor, technology, science fiction and anonymous historical photography to create some really splendid digital imagery. You can see much more in his portfolio, and pickup prints in his shop. (via iGNANT)

See related posts on Colossal about , , .

Money is Material: Watch as Collage Artist Mark Wagner Turns the U.S. Dollar into Art

wagner-1

wagner-2

wagner-3

The Avant/Garde Diaries recently did a short feature on collage artist Mark Wagner (previously) and got some excellent footage of the artist at work as well as a timelapse of one of his recent pieces coming together. Directed and produced by Kelly Nyks and Jared P. Scott.

See related posts on Colossal about , , .

The Art of the Dollar: Meticulous Currency Collages by Mark Wagner

currency-1

currency-2

currency-3

currency-4

wagner-10

currency-5

currency-6

currency-7

currency-8

Brooklyn-based artist Mark Wagner (previously) has been referred to as “the greatest living collage artist” and even “the Michael Jordan of glue”. The artist has a wide variety of artistic pursuits from writing and artist bookmaking to drawing and assemblage, though he is probably best known for his intricately cut and assembled currency collages using the one dollar bill. From his artist statement:

The one dollar bill is the most ubiquitous piece of paper in America. Collage asks the question: what might be done to make it something else? It is a ripe material: intaglio printed on sturdy linen stock, covered in decorative filigree, and steeped in symbolism and concept. Blade and glue transform it-reproducing the effects of tapestries, paints, engravings, mosaics, and computers—striving for something bizarre, beautiful, or unbelievable… the foreign in the familiar.

Wagner had a solo show late last year at Western Exhibitions here in Chicago and is currently preparing for a large exhibition at Pavel Zoubok Gallery in NYC that opens September 6th. (via Faith is Torment)

See related posts on Colossal about , , .

Revelation: Cut Paper Collages and Illustrations by Christine Kim

And we have another great documentary short today. Meet Toronto-based artist Christine Kim whose recent artwork explores intersections between illustration, cut paper collage, and architecture. The video above is part 10 of an ongoing series of top-notch artist interviews conducted by filmmaker Jesse Brass called Making Art.

See related posts on Colossal about , , , , .

The Passage of Time Captured in Layered Landscape Collages by Fong Qi Wei

wei-1

wei-2

wei-3

wei-4

wei-5

wei-6

wei-7

Time can be a difficult variable to visually convey in still photography, both the length of time an exposure takes or a series of photos meant to depict the passage of time can be somewhat ambiguous without a written explanation. In his latest series, Time is a dimension, Singapore-based photographer Fong Qi Wei (previously) explores just that idea by shooting landscapes from a stationary position over a 2-4 hour period and then digitally slicing the images to create a layered collage. He shoots at sunset or sunrise to obtain a wide variation in light and then carefully cuts each image to reveal incremental timeframes. He explains:

The basic structure of a landscape is present in every piece. But each panel or concentric layer shows a different slice of time, which is related to the adjacent panel/layer. The transition from daytime to night is gradual and noticeable in every piece, but would not be something you expect to see in a still image.

Similarly, our experience of a scene is more than a snapshot. We often remember a sequence of events rather than a still frame full of details. In this series, I strive to capture both details and also a sequence of time in a single 2 dimensional canvas. I hope it gives you pause and reconsider what you experience versus what you shoot with your next camera phone.

You can see many more examples on his website, and read more about his process right here.

See related posts on Colossal about , , .

Page 3 of 9«...2345...»