Tag Archives: collage

Picturesque Chinese Landscapes are Actually Disguised Photos of Landfills

Picturesque Chinese Landscapes are Actually Disguised Photos of Landfills  landscapes collage China

Picturesque Chinese Landscapes are Actually Disguised Photos of Landfills  landscapes collage China

Picturesque Chinese Landscapes are Actually Disguised Photos of Landfills  landscapes collage China

Picturesque Chinese Landscapes are Actually Disguised Photos of Landfills  landscapes collage China

Picturesque Chinese Landscapes are Actually Disguised Photos of Landfills  landscapes collage China

Take a few steps back or perhaps just squint your eyes and these images by artist Yao Lu might resemble traditional Chinese landscape paintings of cliffs, waterfalls, and mountains. Look a bit closer and your perspective may change. Lu digitally assembles each of her images using photographs of landfills and other aspects of urbanization draped in green mesh to mimic idyllic scenery. Similar to the recent work of Yang Yongliang featured on this blog just last week, Lu seems to be making a thinly-veiled commentary on the encroaching ecological threat of urbanization. See much more over at Bruce Silverstein Gallery. (via beautiful decay)

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Portraits Made of Shredded Poetry by Jamie Poole

Portraits Made of Shredded Poetry by Jamie Poole typography portraits paper collage

Portraits Made of Shredded Poetry by Jamie Poole typography portraits paper collage

Portraits Made of Shredded Poetry by Jamie Poole typography portraits paper collage

Portraits Made of Shredded Poetry by Jamie Poole typography portraits paper collage

Portraits Made of Shredded Poetry by Jamie Poole typography portraits paper collage

Portraits Made of Shredded Poetry by Jamie Poole typography portraits paper collage

Portraits Made of Shredded Poetry by Jamie Poole typography portraits paper collage

Portraits Made of Shredded Poetry by Jamie Poole typography portraits paper collage

While primarily working as a landscape painter and art teacher, UK artist Jamie Poole was struck with the idea of deconstructing printed poems into individual words and using the text to create large scale portraits. The final pieces are quite large measuring several feet tall, allowing for excruciating detail in both line and shadow, as well as creating an intriguing hybrid of portraiture, typography, and collage. You can see more images of Jamie’s work on his blog and in his Flickr stream. If you liked this, also check out the work of Evan Wondolowski and Lola Dupre. (via junk culture)

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The Silent City: Digitally Assembled Futuristic Megalopolises by Yang Yongliang

The Silent City: Digitally Assembled Futuristic Megalopolises by Yang Yongliang digital collage China
Sleepless Wonderland, Lightbox, 2012

The Silent City: Digitally Assembled Futuristic Megalopolises by Yang Yongliang digital collage China
Sleepless Wonderland, Lightbox, 2012 (detail)

The Silent City: Digitally Assembled Futuristic Megalopolises by Yang Yongliang digital collage China
Sleepless Wonderland, Lightbox, 2012 (detail)

The Silent City: Digitally Assembled Futuristic Megalopolises by Yang Yongliang digital collage China
Sleepless Wonderland, Lightbox, 2012 (detail)

The Silent City: Digitally Assembled Futuristic Megalopolises by Yang Yongliang digital collage China
Snake and Grenade, Lightbox, 2012

The Silent City: Digitally Assembled Futuristic Megalopolises by Yang Yongliang digital collage China
Snake and Grenade, Lightbox, 2012 (detail)

The Silent City: Digitally Assembled Futuristic Megalopolises by Yang Yongliang digital collage China
Wolf and Landmines, Lightbox, 2012

The Silent City: Digitally Assembled Futuristic Megalopolises by Yang Yongliang digital collage China
Full Moon, Lightbox, 2012

The Silent City: Digitally Assembled Futuristic Megalopolises by Yang Yongliang digital collage China
Bowl of Tapei No. 03, 2012

The Silent City: Digitally Assembled Futuristic Megalopolises by Yang Yongliang digital collage China
Bowl of Tapei No. 04, 2012

Chinese artist Yang Yongliang (previously) recently released three new bodies of work that will be on view at Galerie Paris-Beijing from from March 14th to April 27th, 2013. Born in Shanghai in 1980, Yongliang is known for his sprawling photographic collages that depict the devastating effects of uncontrolled urbanisation and industrialisation. At a distance the works look like traditional Chinese painting and calligraphy but when viewed up close, the peaceful mountains and seascapes are found to be choked with buildings, factories, and machinery. The images of above scarcely convey the detail in these pieces, but look at this high resolution version of Sleepless Wonderland to get an idea. Head over to Galerie Paris-Beijing to explore more of the three collections titled Silent Valley, Moonlight, and a Bowl of Taipei. All images courtesy the gallery.

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An Architect Gone Mad: Mysterious Buildings Assembled from Found Photographs by Jim Kazanjian

An Architect Gone Mad: Mysterious Buildings Assembled from Found Photographs by Jim Kazanjian digital collage black and white architecture

An Architect Gone Mad: Mysterious Buildings Assembled from Found Photographs by Jim Kazanjian digital collage black and white architecture

An Architect Gone Mad: Mysterious Buildings Assembled from Found Photographs by Jim Kazanjian digital collage black and white architecture

An Architect Gone Mad: Mysterious Buildings Assembled from Found Photographs by Jim Kazanjian digital collage black and white architecture

An Architect Gone Mad: Mysterious Buildings Assembled from Found Photographs by Jim Kazanjian digital collage black and white architecture

An Architect Gone Mad: Mysterious Buildings Assembled from Found Photographs by Jim Kazanjian digital collage black and white architecture

An Architect Gone Mad: Mysterious Buildings Assembled from Found Photographs by Jim Kazanjian digital collage black and white architecture

Without the use of a camera Portland-based artist Jim Kazanjian sifts through a library of some 25,000 images from which he carefully selects the perfect elements to digitally assemble mysterious buildings born from the mind of an architect gone mad. While the architectural and organic pieces seem wildly random and out of place, Kazanjian brings just enough cohesion to each structure to suggest a fictional purpose or story that begs to be told. You can see much more of his work over on Facebook, and prints are available at 23 Sandy Gallery.

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New Sculptural Collages Made from Antiquarian Books by Alexander Korzer-Robinson

New Sculptural Collages Made from Antiquarian Books by Alexander Korzer Robinson sculpture paper collage books

New Sculptural Collages Made from Antiquarian Books by Alexander Korzer Robinson sculpture paper collage books

New Sculptural Collages Made from Antiquarian Books by Alexander Korzer Robinson sculpture paper collage books

New Sculptural Collages Made from Antiquarian Books by Alexander Korzer Robinson sculpture paper collage books

New Sculptural Collages Made from Antiquarian Books by Alexander Korzer Robinson sculpture paper collage books

New Sculptural Collages Made from Antiquarian Books by Alexander Korzer Robinson sculpture paper collage books

New Sculptural Collages Made from Antiquarian Books by Alexander Korzer Robinson sculpture paper collage books

New Sculptural Collages Made from Antiquarian Books by Alexander Korzer Robinson sculpture paper collage books

New Sculptural Collages Made from Antiquarian Books by Alexander Korzer Robinson sculpture paper collage books

New Sculptural Collages Made from Antiquarian Books by Alexander Korzer Robinson sculpture paper collage books

Like a traditional sculptor carving away at a piece of stone, artist Alexander Korzer-Robinson eviscerates text and whitespace leaving only the images. In doing so he creates entirely new narratives using only the pre-existing illustrations, charts, graphs and other visual elements printed inside of each book. Of his work he says:

By using pre-existing media as a starting point, certain boundaries are set by the material, which I aim to transform through my process. Thus, an encyclopedia can become a window into an alternate world, much like lived reality becomes its alternate in remembered experience. These books, having been stripped of their utilitarian value by the passage of time, regain new purpose. They are no longer tools to learn about the world, but rather a means to gain insight about oneself.

What you see above represents a selection of his work from 2012, but you can see much more on his website. He’ll also have work at the Affordable Art Fair in Hampstead, London starting next week.

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Miniature Worlds Digitally Assembled from Hundreds of Photographs by Catherine Nelson

Miniature Worlds Digitally Assembled from Hundreds of Photographs by Catherine Nelson planets Earth digital collage

Miniature Worlds Digitally Assembled from Hundreds of Photographs by Catherine Nelson planets Earth digital collage

Miniature Worlds Digitally Assembled from Hundreds of Photographs by Catherine Nelson planets Earth digital collage

Miniature Worlds Digitally Assembled from Hundreds of Photographs by Catherine Nelson planets Earth digital collage

Miniature Worlds Digitally Assembled from Hundreds of Photographs by Catherine Nelson planets Earth digital collage

Miniature Worlds Digitally Assembled from Hundreds of Photographs by Catherine Nelson planets Earth digital collage

Miniature Worlds Digitally Assembled from Hundreds of Photographs by Catherine Nelson planets Earth digital collage

Miniature Worlds Digitally Assembled from Hundreds of Photographs by Catherine Nelson planets Earth digital collage

Sydney-based artist Catherine Nelson refers to herself as a painter with a camera, in that she doesn’t see the world as a photographer does but instead uses photos as a medium with which she creates these fantastic miniature worlds. Each work is comprised of hundreds of photographs which she digitally stitches together, drawing from an extensive background in visual special effects having worked on such films as Moulin Rouge, Harry Potter and 300. Of her work Nelson says:

When I embraced the medium of photography, I felt that taking a picture that represented only what was within the frame of the lens wasn’t expressing my personal and inner experience of the world around me. With the eye and training of a painter and with years of experience behind me in film visual effects, I began to take my photos to another level. The ‘Future Memories’ series comprises of 20 floating worlds, meticulously composed with thousands of assembled details. Visual poetry, nature photography and digital techniques blend together to give shape to these transcendental landscapes. The result is a contemporary pictorial mythology that subtly reminds the viewer of a profound truth: that it is in the flourishing variety of the local that the fate of the world resides.

Although the pieces are quite gorgeous to look at right here on Colossal, it’s hard to convey the resolution and scale of each piece which measures about 40×40″ (100x100cm), a level of detail that requires Nelson to spend nearly a month on each piece. It was my assumption based on the perspective and detail that some of these works must be somehow partially rendered in 3D, however she assured me via email that this is not the case. Though she uses digital editing to assemble them, they are almost purely based in photography. Incredible.

Nelson had several pieces on display earlier this month at fotofever in Brussels and will have work later this year at Gallery NOW in Seoul and at CONTEXT in Miami. You can see much more of her work at Galerie Paris-Beijing.

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Portraits Made from Strips of Shredded Money

Portraits Made from Strips of Shredded Money portraits currency collage

Portraits Made from Strips of Shredded Money portraits currency collage

Portraits Made from Strips of Shredded Money portraits currency collage

Portraits Made from Strips of Shredded Money portraits currency collage

Portraits Made from Strips of Shredded Money portraits currency collage

Portraits Made from Strips of Shredded Money portraits currency collage

Artist Evan Wondolowski uses thousands of paper strips from shredded U.S. Federal Reserve Notes to create these amazingly detailed portraits of celebrities and politicians. Evan says that he starts with an underdrawing of the portrait on newsprint and then glues each shred of currency piece by piece before finishing up with a little vine charcoal to increase contrast. Each portrait can take up to a month or more. Keep an eye on his website for new works in the future.

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