Tag Archives: collage

The Art of the Dollar: Meticulous Currency Collages by Mark Wagner

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Brooklyn-based artist Mark Wagner (previously) has been referred to as “the greatest living collage artist” and even “the Michael Jordan of glue”. The artist has a wide variety of artistic pursuits from writing and artist bookmaking to drawing and assemblage, though he is probably best known for his intricately cut and assembled currency collages using the one dollar bill. From his artist statement:

The one dollar bill is the most ubiquitous piece of paper in America. Collage asks the question: what might be done to make it something else? It is a ripe material: intaglio printed on sturdy linen stock, covered in decorative filigree, and steeped in symbolism and concept. Blade and glue transform it-reproducing the effects of tapestries, paints, engravings, mosaics, and computers—striving for something bizarre, beautiful, or unbelievable… the foreign in the familiar.

Wagner had a solo show late last year at Western Exhibitions here in Chicago and is currently preparing for a large exhibition at Pavel Zoubok Gallery in NYC that opens September 6th. (via Faith is Torment)

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Revelation: Cut Paper Collages and Illustrations by Christine Kim

And we have another great documentary short today. Meet Toronto-based artist Christine Kim whose recent artwork explores intersections between illustration, cut paper collage, and architecture. The video above is part 10 of an ongoing series of top-notch artist interviews conducted by filmmaker Jesse Brass called Making Art.

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The Passage of Time Captured in Layered Landscape Collages by Fong Qi Wei

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Time can be a difficult variable to visually convey in still photography, both the length of time an exposure takes or a series of photos meant to depict the passage of time can be somewhat ambiguous without a written explanation. In his latest series, Time is a dimension, Singapore-based photographer Fong Qi Wei (previously) explores just that idea by shooting landscapes from a stationary position over a 2-4 hour period and then digitally slicing the images to create a layered collage. He shoots at sunset or sunrise to obtain a wide variation in light and then carefully cuts each image to reveal incremental timeframes. He explains:

The basic structure of a landscape is present in every piece. But each panel or concentric layer shows a different slice of time, which is related to the adjacent panel/layer. The transition from daytime to night is gradual and noticeable in every piece, but would not be something you expect to see in a still image.

Similarly, our experience of a scene is more than a snapshot. We often remember a sequence of events rather than a still frame full of details. In this series, I strive to capture both details and also a sequence of time in a single 2 dimensional canvas. I hope it gives you pause and reconsider what you experience versus what you shoot with your next camera phone.

You can see many more examples on his website, and read more about his process right here.

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Book Paintings by Ekaterina Panikanova

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© Ekaterina Panikanova

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© Ekaterina Panikanova, courtesy z2o Galleria

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© Ekaterina Panikanova, courtesy z2o Galleria

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© Ekaterina Panikanova, courtesy z2o Galleria

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© Ekaterina Panikanova

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© Ekaterina Panikanova

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© Ekaterina Panikanova, courtesy z2o Galleria

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© Ekaterina Panikanova, courtesy z2o Galleria

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© Ekaterina Panikanova, courtesy z2o Galleria

Artist Ekaterina Panikanova creates densely layered paintings across large spreads of old books and other documents, resulting in artwork that blurs the lines between painting, installation and collage. Born in St. Petersburg in 1975 Panikanova graduated at the top of her class from the Academy of Fine Arts and was subsequently given a studio to work from for five years. She now lives and works in Rome. Much of what you see above was from her second ever solo show Un, due, tre, fuoco at z2o Galleria earlier this year, and if you’d like to see more, check out her website. (via this isn’t happiness)

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Mirrored Photographs Combined with Watercolor by Fabienne Rivory

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French artist Fabienne Rivory creates these unusually beautiful images by working with mirrored photographs and watercolor paints. Rivory has been making artwork that blends paint and photography since 2007, a process she likens to the exploration of memory versus reality. Her most recent series titled Miroir is well worth a look, and prints are available here. (via colossal submissions)

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Picturesque Chinese Landscapes are Actually Disguised Photos of Landfills

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Take a few steps back or perhaps just squint your eyes and these images by artist Yao Lu might resemble traditional Chinese landscape paintings of cliffs, waterfalls, and mountains. Look a bit closer and your perspective may change. Lu digitally assembles each of her images using photographs of landfills and other aspects of urbanization draped in green mesh to mimic idyllic scenery. Similar to the recent work of Yang Yongliang featured on this blog just last week, Lu seems to be making a thinly-veiled commentary on the encroaching ecological threat of urbanization. See much more over at Bruce Silverstein Gallery. (via beautiful decay)

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Portraits Made of Shredded Poetry by Jamie Poole

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While primarily working as a landscape painter and art teacher, UK artist Jamie Poole was struck with the idea of deconstructing printed poems into individual words and using the text to create large scale portraits. The final pieces are quite large measuring several feet tall, allowing for excruciating detail in both line and shadow, as well as creating an intriguing hybrid of portraiture, typography, and collage. You can see more images of Jamie’s work on his blog and in his Flickr stream. If you liked this, also check out the work of Evan Wondolowski and Lola Dupre. (via junk culture)

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