color

Posts tagged
with color



Photography

An Examination of the Color Black in Gorgeous Portraits by Yannis Davy Guibinga

May 14, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

Images from the series "The Darkest Colour," photographed by Yannis Davy Guibinga, featuring Tania Fines and Madjou Diallo, and with bodypainting by Jean Guy Leclerc. All images via Yannis Davy Guibinga.

Images from the series “The Darkest Colour,” photographed by Yannis Davy Guibinga, featuring Tania Fines and Madjou Diallo, and with bodypainting by Jean Guy Leclerc. All images via Yannis Davy Guibinga.

Self-taught Gabonese photographer Yannis Davy Guibinga is known for portraits that highlight the diversity of cultures and identities in the African diaspora. His works are often richly hued, with subjects positioned against bright gradient backgrounds or adorned in warm tones.

In his project The Darkest Colour however, Guibinga moves away from his multi-colored photo shoots to focus entirely on the color black and its relationship to darkness, mourning, and death. The series is set in front of a matte black background and features two nude models whose skin has also been painted black. The works seek to unpack the negative aspects of the both the color and its symbolism.

“Black is generally the colour associated with tragedy, death, and mourning, and the act of passing away is considered to be a tragedy in many cultures,” Guibinga tells Colossal. “‘The Darkest Colour’ seeks to redefine association of black and death with tragedy and sadness by representing the act of passing away as more of a relaxing experience.”

The 22-year-old photographer is currently a student in professional photography at Marsan College in Montreal. You can see more of his portraits, like his series 2050 which explores the future of fashion from a black woman’s perspective, on his website and Instagram. (via WideWalls)

Images from the series "The Darkest Colour, "photographed by Yannis Davy Guibinga, featuring Tania Fines and Madjou Diallo, and with bodypainting by Jean Guy Leclerc. All images via Yannis Davy Guibinga.

 

 



Design History Science

Werner’s Nomenclature of Colours: a Pre-Photographic Guide for Artists and Naturalists

January 31, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

First published in the pre-photographic age, Werner’s Nomenclature of Colours was the preeminent guide to color and its classification for artists, scientists, naturalists, and anthropologists in the 19th-century. Without an image for reference, the book provided immense handwritten detail describing where each specific shade could be found on an animal, plant, or mineral. Prussian Blue for instance could be located in the beauty spot of a mallard’s wing, on the stamina of a bluish-purple anemone, or in a piece of blue copper ore.

The system of classification was first devised by German mineralogist Abraham Gottlob Werner in the late 18th-century. Shortly after Scottish painter Patrick Syme updated Werner’s guide, matching color swatches and his own list of examples to the provided nomenclature.

The book’s poetic names, such as Arterial Blood Red, Berlin Blue, and Verdigris Green, added flourish to the writings of many researchers, allowing vivid descriptions for prose which had previously been limited to a more elementary color palette. Charles Darwin even used the guide during his voyage to the Madeira, Canary, and Cape Verde islands on the H.M.S. Beagle.

The 1814 book has now been republished by Smithsonian Books as a pocket-sized guide, providing a historic connection to vivid colors found in the field for a future generation of artists, scientists, and curious naturalists. You can preorder the 2018 hardcover for its release date on February 6, 2018.  (via Co.Design)

 

 



Craft

A Floating Coffee Cup Pours a Rainbow of Liquid Pencils

December 28, 2017

Christopher Jobson

Texas-based artist and maker Bobby Duke runs a popular YouTube channel where he posts a variety of art and craft videos on stone carving, sculpting, and painting projects. His latest piece was the creation of a fun floating cup that appears to pour a splash of liquid pencils. Duke is auctioning the final piece on Ebay with part of the proceeds going to St. Jude Children’s Hospital.

 

 



Art Photography

Everyday Objects Obsessively Organized into Patterns by Adam Hillman

December 11, 2017

Christopher Jobson

New Jersey-based “object arranger” Adam Hillman has really stepped up his organization efforts the last few months, pushing his precisely organized patterns of everyday objects into increasingly more complicated designs. Everything from breakfast cereal to office supplies finds its place in these tightly controlled symmetrical layouts that take hours to measure, cut, and arrange. Hillman now shares some of his best work as prints and you can follow him on Instagram.

 

 



Art

Collaborative Acrylic Paintings That Aim to Visually Map the Perceptual Experiences of Synesthesia

October 9, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

American artist and filmmaker Lucy Engelman has a far different experience of the world than most. Engelman has a phenomenon called Synesthesia, which crosses her perceptual pathways to allow her to taste colors, smell sounds, and even experience verbal data as a spectrum of vibrant colors. Engelman’s husband, Scottish painter Daniel Mullen, decided to translate her complex sensory world in a way that might be easier to understand for those of us who don’t see days and numbers as pockets of color.

The collaboration exists as a set of paintings titled A Different Kind of Time: Sequencing Spatial Temporal Synesthesia. The works each contain a sequence of flat rectangular shapes arranged in a variety of arches and lines. The angle of the shapes is switched in each work, some aligned with only one side facing the audience, while others seem to project right through the canvas or retreat back into the painting’s rotated plane. Engelman explains the works are the closest visual approximation to what she experiences, especially in relation to her mind’s translation of letters, numbers, and time.

You can view more of the paintings based on Engelman’s unique view of the world on Daniel Mullen’s website. (via Colossal Submissions)

 

 



Art

Giant Dabs of Thick Oil Paint Captured as Hyperrealist Colored Pencil Drawings

August 16, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

Australian artist Cj Hendry (previously) tricks the eye with her hyper-realistic drawings, works that recreate the appearance of thick swabs of brightly colored paint. To achieve the dimensionality and sheen of fresh oil paint she layers dry pigment atop colored pencil, accurately portraying the liquid medium’s viscosity.

The series, Complimentary Colors, is far different than the artist’s previous style, which for several years had been exclusively black and white. You can view pieces from her past and present, as well as a series of billboard-sized works, on the artist’s Instagram. (via My Modern Met)

 

 



Art Design

A Technicolor Basketball Court Emerges in Paris

June 26, 2017

Christopher Jobson

Photo © Sébastien Michelini

In a unique collaboration between French fashion brand Pigalle and design agency Ill-Studio, the Paris Duperré basketball court was recently redesigned and repainted with a vibrant new color scheme. The narrow basketball court is nestled between two apartment buildings in the 9th arrondissement and has become a backdrop of sorts for unconventional color schemes, the first of which appeared in 2015. Photos courtesy Alex Penfornis and Sébastien Michelini. (via It’s Nice That)

Photo © Penfornis Alex

Photo © Penfornis Alex

Photo © Penfornis Alex

Photo © Penfornis Alex

Photo © Penfornis Alex

Photo © Penfornis Alex

Photo © Penfornis Alex

Photo © Penfornis Alex