Tag Archives: color

What Color Is It? A Website that Translates the Current Time into Color

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Created by Berlin-based artist and designer James E. Murphy, What Color Is It is a website that translates the current time (based on a 24-hour clock) into a corresponding hex color value. The color of the page changes gradually as each second ticks by. This could be a great start to a watch face for the Apple Watch. (via Swissmiss)

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A 1,000-piece CMYK Color Gamut Jigsaw Puzzle by Clemens Habicht

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This 1,000-piece jigsaw puzzle contains exactly 1,000 different colors arranged in the form of a CMYK gamut and is guaranteed to drive you insane. The creator of the 1,000 Colors puzzle, Clemens Habicht, suggests the puzzle is actually easier than traditional image-based puzzles. When faced with a field of color, he says the placement of every piece becomes almost intuitive.

The idea came from enjoying the subtle differences in the blue of a sky in a particularly brutal jigsaw puzzle, I found that without the presence of image detail to help locate a piece I was relying only on an intuitive sense of colour, and this was much more satisfying to do than the areas with image details.

What is strange is that unlike ordinary puzzles where you are in effect redrawing a specific picture from a reference you have a sense of where every piece belongs compared to every other piece. There is a real logic in the doing that is weirdly soothing, therapeutic, it must be the German coming out in me. As each piece clicks perfectly into place, just so, it’s a little win, like a little pat on the back.

The 1,000 Colors puzzle ships from Australia and costs about $33 (about $58 with shipping to the U.S.). (via Boing Boing)

Update: The 1,000 Colors Puzzle is now in the Colossal Shop.

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Swirling Photographs of Mixed Paint by Mark Lovejoy

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Working from his studio in Alpine, Texas, artist Mark Lovejoy creates richly textured images of mixed paint, but although he’s somewhat secretive about his process, one thing is clear: they aren’t just photographs of mixed paint. The act of creating the color formations alone sounds more like an act of chemistry than art as he mixes resins, oils, diluents, waxes, and drying agents to create the gloppy textures you see here. Portions are then photographed, reworked, and reshot. In the end, we’re left staring at beautifully colorful images that exist somewhere between salt water taffy, Jackson Pollock paintings, and an alluring industrial accident. Whatever they are, Lovejoy is extremely proficient, cranking out several images each day which he shares on his website. Prints are available of every image. (via It’s Nice That)

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Purple Views of the San Francisco Bay Salt Ponds by Julieanne Kost

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While flying south of San Francisco recently, photographer Julieanne Kost managed to capture this beautiful series of photographs that look like something out of a Dr. Seuss book. The color in the photos isn’t altered, nor were the images taken with an infrared lens, instead what you’re seeing are countless trillions of microorganisms thriving away inside shallow salt ponds. It takes an average of five years to transform bay water into salt brine, during which the various organisms that live in the ponds undergo a dramatic chromatic shift as the salinity increases. You can a bit more about the process over on Amusing Planet, and see more of Kost’s photographs on Behance. All photos courtesy the photographer. (via This Isn’t Happiness)

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Color Coded Food and Flowers Photographed by Emily Blincoe

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Photographer Emily Blincoe (previously) continues to make us smile with her arrays of food and plants perfectly organized by color. Blincoe collects every color permutation of tomatoes, oranges, eggs, and even candy and then sorts them into groups and gradients for each image. Her wildly popular photos have attracted a huge following on Instagram and Tumblr, and many are available as prints.

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The Cyanometer Is a 225-Year-Old Tool for Measuring the Blueness of the Sky

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Bibliothèque de Genève, Switzerland

Hot on the heels of a post earlier this week about centuries-old guide for mixing watercolors, I stumbled onto this 18th century instrument designed to measure the blueness of the sky called a Cyanometer. The simple device was invented in 1789 by Swiss physicist Horace-Bénédict de Saussure and German naturalist Alexander von Humboldt who used the circular array of 53 shaded sections in experiments above the skies over Geneva, Chamonix and Mont Blanc. The Cyanometer helped lead to a successful conclusion that the blueness of the sky is a measure of transparency caused by the amount of water vapor in the atmosphere. You can learn more at the Royal Society of Chemistry. (via Free Parking)

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Colorful City Silhouette Prints by Yoni Alter

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London-based designer Yoni Alter has a huge line of colorful prints featuring overlaid silhouettes (to scale) of every major landmark found in different cities. There’s too many places to list here, but you can explore more in his shop, and many if his pieces were just on view at Kemistry Gallery earlier this week. Love that Colossal NYC print.

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