Tag Archives: computers

Be Your Own Souvenir 

So you’re at the museum, and deep down in the sub-basement right next to the restrooms you happen to discover an enormous machine that looks like it was pulled from the Aliens II movie set. And then you notice you can insert a dollar, and suddenly the machine whirs to life and pipes hot, neon green plasticine into a mold in front of your very eyes as you inahale noxious fumes. Within moments you’re in the possession of a bona-fide neon green submarine, a memento of your visit to the museum that smells strange for days. Be Your Own Souvenir by Barcelona-based blablabLAB is just like that, except a trillion times more awesome. Using custom software developed using openFrameworks and openKinect, visitors film themselves in front of 3 kinect sensors for a full 360-degree scan and within moments a 3D printer known as a RepRap machine spits out a little army guy version of themselves. Every museum in the world should have one of these in their sub-basement, though they can probably install this by the front door. (via vimeo)

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Junkyard Jumbotron 

The Junkyard Jumbotron is a system that allows laptops or phones in close proximity to be ganged together to form a large display. The idea is actually pretty simple: enter a unique URL on all the devices which displays a QR code on each device, then photograph the resulting array of screens and email it to a special address and that’s all the system needs to slice and orient images on your new jumbo display. The whole projected was designed by Rick Borovoy at MIT and there’s a beta version for you to start tinkering with.

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Visualizing Wifi 

This is one of those things I’ve always wondered in the back of my mind. How far does a WiFi network actually reach and what would it look like? How come I have reception in one spot and not in another? Well a team from Oslo including Timo Arnall, Jørn Knutsen, and Einar Sneve Martinussen set out to answer just such a question by creating visual representations of actual Wifi networks to spectacular effect. Utilizing long-exposure photography and a four-metre long measuring rod with 80 LED light points they were able to “reveal” cross-sections in wireless networks.

We built the WiFi measuring rod, a 4-metre tall probe containing 80 lights that respond to the Received Signal Strength (RSSI) of a particular WiFi network. When we walk through architectural, urban spaces with this probe, while taking long-exposure photographs, we visualise the cross-sections, or strata, of WiFi signal strength, situated within photographic urban scenes. The cross-sections are an abstraction of WiFi signal strength, a line graph of RSSI across physical space. Although it can be used to determine actual signal strength at a given point, it is much more interesting as a way of seeing the overall pattern, the relative peaks and the troughs situated in the surrounding physical space.

See the full photo set and read much more about the project here.

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