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Art

Surreal Beasts Carrying the Weight of the World by Wang Ruilin

January 7, 2016

Christopher Jobson

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DREAMS-Crocodile, 2013. Copper & paint, 120×46×120 cm. Photo by Zou Shengwu.

Beijing-based artist Wang Ruilin (previously) is known for his gentle depictions of animals both real and fictional that appear to carry the heavy weight of mountains, oceans, and entire miniature worlds on their backs. The smooth and sinuous copper sculptures borrow from elements of Eastern classical painting merged with Ruilin’s personal experiences and interpretations of his dreams. The artist frequently shares a mix of old and new artworks on Behance, and you can see more on his website.

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DREAMS-Crocodile, detail.

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DREAMS-Crocodile, studio view.

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DREAMS-FAWN, 2015. Copper & paint.

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DREAMS-FAWN (small size), 2015. Copper & paint.

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DREAMS-FAWN, detail.

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DREAMS-Mountain&Sea No.2, 2013. Copper & paint.

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DREAMS-Mountain & Sea No.1, detail.

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DREAMS-Mountain & Sea No.1, detail.

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DREAMS-Mountain & Sea No.1, 2013. Copper and paint.

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Horse.Play – No.3, 2011. 120×95×35 cm, copper and paint. Photo by Zou Shengwu.

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Horse.Play – No.3, detail.

 

 



Art

Surreal Animal Sculptures Carrying Monumental Elements of Nature by Wang Ruilin

September 23, 2014

Johnny Strategy

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In an ongoing series titled “Dreams,” Chinese sculptor Wang Ruilin creates surreal animals that don’t act like animals at all. Their backs, and sometimes their antlers, function as arcs that carry monumental elements of nature like lakes and mountain cliffs. It’s like an animal-version of Noah’s Arc without people. “Leaving individuals behind is painful”, admits the 29-year old sculptor, but it allows us to reduce confusion and see the value and force of life.

Ruilin’s copper sculptures are the result of Eastern classical painting and imagery that’s been combined with past experiences. He recalls a life-changing incident when, at the age of 4 or 5, he encountered a painting of a horse by the artist Xu Beihong. He became obsessed with the vigorous animal and has ever since identified with it. The artist describes his creative process as digging deep into his heart and excavating “works that originally exist from various experiences.”

Ruilin’s “Dreams” series was most recently part of ART Beijing earlier this year. You can see more of his work on his website or follow him on Behance.

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