coral

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Art

Hyperrealistic Depictions of Fish Merged With Their Coral Environments by Lisa Ericson

December 15, 2016

Kate Sierzputowski

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Artist, illustrator, and designer Lisa Ericson (previously) paints hyperrealistic images of imaginary animals, hybrids that intertwine species. Previously focused on a body of work that merged mice and butterflies, Ericson’s newest series focuses on the creatures below, painting bright fish against matte black backgrounds. The vibrant works highlight a variety of coral integrated into fins and tails of scaly animals, as well as showcasing the groups of fish that have decided to make these tails their home.

Ericson’s work is currently in a two-person exhibition titled Supernature at Antler Gallery in Portland, OR which runs through December 22. You can view more of her in-process and completed animal paintings on her Instagram and Facebook.

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Art

A Translucent Figurative Sculpture Appears Camouflaged Against the Horizon of Bondi Beach

November 11, 2016

Christopher Jobson

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Recently on view as part of Sculpture by the Sea in Bondi, this unusual figurative sculpture by artist Alessandra Rossi seems to have captured the imagination of many, becoming one of the most popular pieces of this year’s exhibition. Titled Untitled (coral), Rossi says the piece depicting a solitary young girl in a dress is inspired in part by the phenomenon of coral bleaching, something that occurs in nature when ocean water becomes too warm and coral begins to expel an algae giving it a white appearance. Additionally, the work grapples with modern issues of identity, functioning “as a metaphor for the patination and discoloration of emotion engendered by the digital era.”

The sculpture’s translucent layered appearance changes dramatically when viewed from different angles during the day and at times almost vanishes against the horizon of Bondi beach. You can see more sculptures from Sculpture by the Sea 2016 here.

Alessandra Rossi, Untitled Coral. Sculpture by the Sea, Bondi 2016. Photo by Tony Wakeham.

Alessandra Rossi, Untitled Coral. Sculpture by the Sea, Bondi 2016. Photo by Tony Wakeham.

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Alessandra Rossi, Untitled Coral. Sculpture by the Sea, Bondi 2016. Photo by Clyde Yee.

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Alessandra Rossi, Untitled Coral. Sculpture by the Sea, Bondi 2016. Photo by Grace Sui.

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Photo by Brian Thomas

 

 



Photography Science

A Macro Timelapse Highlights the Micro Movements of Spectacularly Colored Coral

September 29, 2016

Kate Sierzputowski

Interested in documenting one of the oldest animals on Earth, Barcelona-based production company myLapse set to capture the minimal movements of brightly colored coral, recording actions rarely seen by the human eye. The short film took nearly 25,000 individual images of the marine invertebrates to compose, and photography of species, such as the Acanthophyllia, Trachyphyllia, Heteropsammia cochlea, Physogyra, took over a year.

The production team hopes the film attracts attention to the Great Barrier Reef, encouraging watchers to take a deeper interest in one of the natural wonders of the world that is being rapidly bleached due to climate change. You can see more up-close images of the coral species featured in this film on Flickr. (via Sploid)

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Art

Human Skeletons Assembled with Found Coral by Gregory Halili

June 16, 2016

Christopher Jobson

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With parched white pieces of found sea coral, artist Gregory Halili has been creating skeletal parts of the human anatomy from hands and arms all the way up to a lifesize recreation of a human skeleton suspended atop a giant piece of driftwood. The irregular coral segments are uncanny stand-ins for human bones, and it’s no surprise the artist is able to identify anatomical details within sea life due to his previous work with skulls carved from mother of pearl. Halili was born in the Philippines in 1975 and spent his childhood surrounded by tropical wildlife and abundant regional flora and fauna that would go on to influence his artistic career in New Jersey. You can see more of his recent work on Artsy and at Nancy Hoffman Gallery.

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Art

Spiraling Coral Reefs Assembled from Precisely Cut Wood by Joshua Abarbanel

April 30, 2016

Christopher Jobson

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LA-based sculptor Joshua Abarbanel fabricates wood sculptures and installations reminiscent of coral reefs comprised of concentric flower-like blooms. The artist builds both smaller standalone artworks that rest on a pedestal and larger wall or ceiling-mounted pieces that seem to grow organically in every direction. Each piece first takes shape on a computer before being cut from assorted woods with the aid of a laser cutter. From Abarbanel’s artists statement:

Finding inspiration in fractals, accretive formations, and the Fibonacci sequence, Abarbanel creates art that often simultaneously evokes microscopic and aerial perspectives, such that the compositions serve as metaphors for archetypal relationships between people, between individuals and communities, and between humankind and the planet. His work also illustrates how disparate parts can come together to make a whole in beautiful and startling ways.

Abarbanel recently opened an exhibition of work at Porch Gallery in Ojai, California through May 29, 2016. (via Hi-Fructose)

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Art

New Ceramic Coral Reefs by Courtney Mattison Draw Attention to Earth’s Changing Oceans

February 17, 2016

Kate Sierzputowski

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“Aqueduct” (2016), glazed stoneware and porcelain, 8 x 8 x 1 feet, all images via Courtney Mattison

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“Aqueduct” (2016), glazed stoneware and porcelain, 8 x 8 x 1 feet

Doubling as an artist and ocean advocate, Courtney Mattison (previously) produces large-scale ceramic installations that draw attention to conservation of our planet’s seas. Her latest installation “Aqueduct” showcases hundreds of porcelain sea creatures including anemones, sponges, and coral sprouting from a porcelain air duct. The piece asks us to imagine the plight of these undersea creatures as tropical sea temperatures begin to rise, asking where they might migrate to once their homes have been rendered uninhabitable.

In addition to large-scale installations, Mattison also sculpts more intimate vignettes. Her series “Hope Spots” depicts areas in our seas that are critical to the overall health of the ecosystem. Each of the sculptures is a representation of one of these spots as identified by Mattison’s longtime hero and marine biologist Dr. Sylvia Earle.

The Denver-based artist studied marine ecology and ceramics at Skidmore College and received a Master of Arts degree in environmental studies from Brown University. Last year she was named one of the top 100 “Ocean Heroes” by Origin Magazine. Her most recent exhibition is “Sea Change” currently at the Virginia Museum of Contemporary Art through April 17, 2016. You can see more of Mattison’s finished and in-progress installations on her Instagram.

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“Aqueduct” (2016), glazed stoneware and porcelain, 8 x 8 x 1 feet

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“Aqueduct” (2016), glazed stoneware and porcelain, 8 x 8 x 1 feet

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“Coral Sea II” (2015), glazed stoneware + porcelain, 17 x 16.5 x 11.5 inches

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“Chagos Archipelago II” (2015), glazed stoneware + porcelain, 17 x 16 x 9 inches

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“Outer Seychelles II” (2015), glazed stoneware, 17 x 16 x 9 inches

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“Micronesian Islands” (2015), glazed stoneware + porcelain, 17 x 17.5 x 12.5 inches

 

 



Amazing Science

An Extraordinary Macro Timelapse of Aquatic Wildlife by Sandro Bocci

February 19, 2015

Christopher Jobson

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The above clip is a trailer of sorts for an upcoming non-verbal film titled Prograve by Italian filmmaker and documentarist Sandro Bocci. The feature is billed as (translated from Italian) “an experimental film orbiting scientific and philosophical reflections on time and space, and that through various shooting techniques, fields of magnification, and an exciting soundtrack, weaves a web between science and magic.” The section shown here depicts beautiful macro timelapses of coral, sponges and other aquatic wildlife filmed under ultraviolet light. You can see additional stills from the upcoming film here. Music by Maurizio Morganti. (via Vimeo Staff Picks, Coudal)