Tag Archives: crayons

The First Blue Pigment Created in Over 200 Years to be Used in a Crayon 

YInMn blue (photo courtesy Oregon State University)

YInMn blue (photo courtesy Oregon State University)

The first blue pigment to have been created in over 200 years will serve as the newest Crayola crayon. “YlnMn blue” was not developed within an arts context, but rather accidentally discovered in in an Oregon State University (OSU) chemistry lab in 2009. Graduate student Andrew Smith made the discovery alongside Mas Subramanian after combining manganese oxide, yttrium, and indium, elements which also serve as the inspiration for the pigment’s name.

“Most pigments are discovered by chance,” Subramanian explained in a statement. “The reason is because the origin of the color of a material depends not only on the chemical composition, but also on the intricate arrangement of atoms in the crystal structure. So someone has to make the material first, then study its crystal structure thoroughly to explain the color.”

YlnMn blue has a unique elemental structure which allows its manganese ions to absorb red and green wavelengths of light, only reflecting back a deep blue. This color is so durable that even when placed in oil or water it does not fade which makes it an attractive and versatile commercial product.

Shepherd Color Company, which received exclusive licensing to YlnMn blue in 2015, has since partnered with Crayola to launch its newest crayon. YlnMn blue’s name will be replaced this summer after a public rebranding contest by Crayola which ends June 2. The vibrant blue will take the place of Crayola’s yellow Dandelion crayon, which is being retired after a 27-year-run. (via Hyperallergic)

Photo courtesy of Karl Maasdam/Oregon State University

Professor Mas Subramanian gazes at YInMn blue which was discovered in his lab in 2009. (Photo courtesy of Karl Maasdam/Oregon State University)

See related posts on Colossal about , .

Chemical Compound Stickers for Crayons Help Teach Kids Chemistry While Coloring 

colors-1

The folks over at Que Interesante created this clever sticker pack for crayons, effectively turning color names into the chemical compounds the correlate with each hue. The sets seem like a fun way to learn for a science-minded family and are available in number of different packs or in bulk for schools. (via Laughing Squid)

colors-2

colors-4

colors-3

See related posts on Colossal about , , , .

Designers Construct Crayon-Inspired Looks for New York City Bloomingdale’s 

"Unmellow Yellow" by Nanette Lepore

“Unmellow Yellow” by Nanette Lepore

For spring 2015, Bloomingdale’s reached out to several designers to create pieces that both matched and were constructed by iconic Crayola colors. The pieces are designed with playful colors, yet have a sharp edge, the points of the crayons adding 3D elements to many of the elaborate pieces. The most dynamic, a bright yellow dress designed by Nanette Lepore, showcases a bustier of organized pinwheel crayon segments extending from the ornate neckline.

Other designers chosen were Rebecca Taylor, Clover Canyon, Rebecca Minkoff, Torn by Ronny Kobo, and Parker. Parker added a creative spin to the project, incorporating the Jungle Green crayon wrappers as faux-fabric within their designed romper. Designers Derek Farrar and Laurieanne Gilner explained that not only was the piece environmentally sound, but also gave them a serious case of spring fever.

The pieces, photographed by Matthew Carasella, are currently on display at the 59th Street Bloomingdale’s location in New York City, and more detailed shots can be found on Carasella’s portfolio site here. (via Laughing Squid)

Update: It should also be noted that another artist, Herb Williams (previously), has been creating similar Crayon fashions since 2007.

"Unmellow Yellow" by Nanette Lepore

“Unmellow Yellow” by Nanette Lepore

"Bittersweet" by Torn by Ronny Kobo

“Bittersweet” by Torn by Ronny Kobo

"Clover Canyon" by Mountain Meadow

“Clover Canyon” by Mountain Meadow

"Midnight Blue" by Rebecca Taylor

“Midnight Blue” by Rebecca Taylor

"Banana Mania" by Rebecca Minkoff

“Banana Mania” by Rebecca Minkoff

"Banana Mania" by Rebecca Minkoff

“Banana Mania” by Rebecca Minkoff

"Jungle Green" by Parker

“Jungle Green” by Parker

See related posts on Colossal about , , .

An Alphabet of Animals Carved from Crayons and Other Miniature Pencil Works by Diem Chau 

chau-1
Armadillo, Boy, Cat, Dove, Elephant, Frog

chau-2
Girl, Handstand, Iguana, Jellyfish, Koala, Ladybug

chau-3
Manatee, Nautilus, Owl, Penguin, Quail, Rabbit, Seahorse

chau-4
Tiger, Urchin, Viper, Wolf, Xiphosura (Horseshoecrab), Yoga, Zebra

chau-5

chau-6

chau-9

chau-7

chau-8

An artist’s medium is as varied as imagination allows and you’ll find hundreds, maybe even thousands of them here on Colossal. But occasionally a medium itself is altered to create an artwork, as is the case with Seattle artist Diem Chau (previously here and here) who works within the narrow confines of graphite pencil leads and colored crayons to carve her delicate sculptures of animals and people. A native of Vietnam, Chau and her family came to America as refugees in 1986 and would later receive a BFA from Cornish College of the Arts after which she began exhibiting her works in New York, Miami, Seattle and Los Angeles.

Luckily we’ll finally get a glimpse of Chau’s miniature carvings here in Chicago at Packer Schopf Gallery opening this Friday. Almost everything you see here will be on view and the artist will be giving a talk at 1pm the following day on April 6th, 2013. See more of her new A-Z series on Flickr and on her blog.

See related posts on Colossal about , , , , , .

Crayon Fire Sculptures by Herb Williams 

Artist Herb Williams is one of the only people in the world to have an account with Crayola. I imagine him whipping out his cell phone, speed dialing Crayola Headquarters and saying “I need 40,000 Screamin’ Greens and 20,000 Tickle Me Pinks. Tonight.” I’m not sure if that’s exactly how it works, but lets go with it.

This latest work by Williams, Unwanted Visitor: Portrait of Wildfire, just opened at the National Ranching Heritage Center at Texas Tech University in Lubbock. The five swirling flames made of thousands of crayons are meant to resemble the recent wildfires that ravaged the state several weeks ago. Over time, the sculptures themselves will be ravaged by the hot Texas heat, and will gradually begin to melt, turning the already brilliant color gradation into a dripping, gooey mess. Awesome right? The project began as a small proof-of-concept on Kickstarter only a month ago and is now open to the public at NRHC. Special thanks to Emily Arellano, Herb Williams, and photographer Ashton Thornhill who captured the images above. (via kelly podzemny)

See related posts on Colossal about , , , .

Page 1 of 212