Tag Archives: device

An Aerial Laser Display Capable of Projecting 3D Objects in Mid-Air

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A team of researchers in Japan lead by Akira Asano of Burton Inc. have developed a 3D aerial display capable of projecting text and imagery in mid-air. The Aerial Burton works by firing a 1kHz infrared pulse directly into a 3D scanner which in turn focuses and reflects the laser to a specific point in the air. Molecules at the end of the laser then ionize, releasing energy in the form of photons. While the full potential for such a display has yet to be seen, Asano suggests it could be used as a communication aid in the event of a disaster by communicating evacuation routes or broadcasting the location of emergency supplies. Personally, I would be satisfied with a 3D laser butterfly in my backyard. (via DigInfo)

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Electric Objects: A Dedicated Computer for the Display of Digital Artwork

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Currently funding over on Kickstarter, the E01 is a computer designed specifically for the display of art. The device was created by New York-based Electronic Objects who aims to simplify the display of digital art with the help of a dedicated system. The E01 can be wall-mounted or used with a stand and is controlled completely with your phone so you can swap out art, videos, GIFs, and even code-based projects that are executed in real time.

While there are several online services involving the sale and/or display of digital artworks (Sedition comes to mind), Electronic Objects is one of the first to offer the complete package of a digital display, distribution system, and artwork itself, not to mention a developer SDK which opens the door for untold applications in the future. They’ve also announced content partnerships with the New York Public Library, Behance, Giphy, and the Museum of the Moving Image. Several of their demos include artwork by artists seen right here on Colossal including David Szakaly and Zach Dougherty. The E01 is $300 over on Kickstarter. (via Kottke)

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New Bird & Butterfly Flip Book Machines by Juan Fontanive

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Artist Juan Fontanive (previously) constructs perpetually looping flip book machines that depict flying birds lifted from audubon guides and illustrations of butterflies. Part film and part sculpture, almost every aspect of the flip books are assembled by hand from the minutely toothed gears, clips, nuts, bolts, wormwheels and sprockets to the carefully screen printed imagery. Of the curious devices Gild Williams remarked, “Fontanive’s artworks seem strangely possessed, producing curiously moving animals that are neither living nor dead, or creating ghostly systems which seem to float mid-air and follow a pace and logic of their own.” You can see much more of his work over at Riflemaker.

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Turn Any iPhone Photo into a Polaroid with the Impossible Instant Lab

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After a wildly successful Kickstarter last year, the Impossible Project have finally made their handy iPhone polaroid printer, The Impossible Instant Lab, available to the general public. The portable lab allows you to turn any photograph on your iPhone or iPod Touch into a bonafide polaroid print in just moments, harkening back to ye olden days when photos were regarded more as physical artifacts that could be shared in real life. Learn more about it over on Co.Design.

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One Step Closer to Hover Boards: Three-Dimensional Mid-Air Acoustic Manipulation

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While we’ve seen examples of objects suspended mid-air using quantum levitation and acoustic levitation, a team of three Japanese engineers from The University of Tokyo and the Nagoya Institute of Technology recently unveiled an ambitious device that uses sound waves to move objects through three dimensional space. The machine uses four arrays of speakers to make soundwaves that intersect at a focal point that can be moved up, down, left, and right using external controls. You would think such machine would be extremely loud, but according to one of the engineers the device uses ultrasonic speakers and is almost completely silent. You can read more about it right here. (via Reddit)

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Incredible Dynamic Target Tracking Camera Perfectly Follows Moving Objects

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Currently under development at the Ishikawa Oku Lab at the University of Tokyo, the Dynamic Target Tracking Camera System can track a fast moving object while keeping it perfectly centered in the middle of a screen. The device consists of two mirrors for pan and tilt, and a group of lenses that move at extremely high speeds to track and film objects at a rate of one image every 1/1000th of a second. Not only can the camera film them but it can also dynamically project images onto them as demonstrated in the video. Slow motion playback in sports will never be the same. (via booooooom)

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Beautiful Thoughts: Artist Lisa Park Manipulates Water with Her Mind

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Conceptual artist Lisa Park has been experimenting with a specialized device called a NeuroSky EEG headset that helps transform brain activity into streams of data that can be manipulated for the purposes of research, or in this case, a Fluxus-inspired performance art piece titled Eunoia (Greek for “beautiful thought”). Park used the EEG headset to monitor the delta, theta, alpha, and beta waves of her brain as well as eye movements and transformed the resulting data with specialized software into sound waves. Five speakers are placed under shallow dishes of water which then vibrate in various patterns in accordance with her brain activity.

While the system is not an exact science, Park rehearsed for nearly a month by thinking about specific people whom she had strong emotional reactions to. The artist then correlated each of the five speakers with certain emotions: sadness, anger, hatred, desire, and happiness. According to the Creator’s Project her hope had been to achieve a sort of zen-like state resulting in complete silence, however it proved to be ultimately unattainable, a result that is actually somewhat poetic.

It’s important to note that artists have long been using EEG devices to create “music with the mind”. Composer and experimental musician Alvin Lucier had a somewhat similar performance called Music for Solo Performer back in 1965. Read more about Euonia over on the Creator’s Project. (via booooooom)

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