Tag Archives: digital

Star Wars Characters Reimagined as Ancient Greek Statues by French Artist Travis Durden 


I’ve never specifically asked myself what Yoda and and Darth Vader might look like if reimagined as classical Greek nudes, but I can’t say I’m disappointed that somebody made this non-dream a reality. Artist Travis Durden took this idea to an artistic level, using digital technology to sculpt five Star Wars figures out of faux-marble. The heads of each of the sculptures are pulled directly from the movie franchise, while the bodies are sourced from statues found within Paris’s Louvre. The new amalgamations display a softer side to the characters, Darth Vader now sporting tendrils of hair that fall from his once menacing mask, and a stormtrooper casually reads from an ancient text.

The artist behind the sculptures chooses to remain hidden, his artist’s name a mash-up of characters from two of his favorite cult films. [I can only guess where his last name comes from.] Durden is interested in also creating mash-ups within his work, opposite worlds converging to create an original composite. His Star Wars sculptures are his newest works, and can be seen in the exhibition “Contre Attaque,” or counter attack, currently at Galerie Sakura in Paris. Prints are available on Galerie Sakura’s website here. (via Designboom)


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More Figures from Classical Paintings Imagined as Part of Modern-Day Life in Kiev by Alexey Kondakov 



Ukranian artist Alexey Kondakov continues his ongoing digital collage project “Art History in Contemporary Life” (previously) with these latest additions. Kondakov uses his own photographs of urban Kiev as a backdrop for gods, angels, and other figures from classical paintings which look like they’re joining your daily commute. You can see a few more images scrolling through his Facebook page.







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Artist Jane Long Digitally Manipulates Black and White WWI-Era Photos Into Colorful Works of Fantasy 

All Hands on Deck

All images provided by Jane Long Photography

Australian artist Jane Long transforms cracked and faded black and white photographs into colorful works of fantasy, giving the subjects a new, and entirely surreal context. The images she uses for her series, Dancing with Costica, were captured over a half century ago by Costică Acsinte a Romanian war photographer who documented WWI.

The glass-plate photographs by Costica capture the straight faces and intense eyes of the subjects taken long before smiling was common in images. “I wanted to change the context of the images,” says Long. “Photographic practices at the time meant people rarely smiled in photos but that doesn’t mean they didn’t laugh and love. I wanted to introduce that to the images.”

By altering the images Long imagines the subjects as characters, letting the audience decide whether they are bad or good. These colorful transformations have been a source of controversy as some viewers have felt it improper to alter images of those she doesn’t know. In response to these accusations the artist stands by her work and explains, “I wanted people to see these figures as real people, more than just an old photograph. Adding colour completely changes our perception of images.”

Long’s series Dancing with Costica will be exhibited from August 22nd to September 20th as part of the Ballarat International Photo Biennale. You can see more work by Long on her Facebook page here. (via My Modern Met)

Neptune's Bride



Tall Poppies


Burn it Down

A Fond Farewell



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Artist Alexey Kondakov Imagines Figures from Classical Paintings as Part of Contemporary Life 


For his ongoing series “Art History in Contemporary Life,” Ukrainian artist Alexey Kondakov takes scenes and figures lifted from classical paintings and drops them into modern-day life. Bouguereau’s Song of the Angels appears to take place on an empty subway car while a pair of men from Holbein’s famous The Ambassadors are transported to the table of a seedy bar. Much like Etienne Lavie’s billboard series and Julien de Casabianca’s recent Outings Project, the series creates an interesting and playful new context for artworks usually only encountered in museums and art history books. You can see more over on Facebook. (via Supersonic)






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Raw & Rendered: Experimental 3D Artworks by Joey Camacho 


In early 2014, Vancouver-based graphic artist Joey Camacho set out to learn more about rendering images using Cinema 4D and Octane Render, with the goal of creating a new piece each day. His first attempts were pretty rudimentary, but it wasn’t long before his exploration and experimentation began to pay off with increasinly subtle details inspired by biology, sound, and geometry. Only several months into his ‘Progress Before Perfection‘ project, he started getting requests for prints as his images were shared widely around Tumblr and elsewhere. You can see more of his work on Behance and prints of many pieces are available through his website.











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Asphyxia: A Striking Fusion of Dance and Motion Capture Technology 





Asphyxia is an experimental film project by Maria Takeuchi and Frederico Phillips that explores human movement through motion capture technology. The team used two inexpensive Xbox One Kinect sensors to capture the movements of dancer Shiho Tanaka and then rendered the data inside a near photo-realistic environment. From their description of the project:

The project is an effort to explore new ways to use and/or combine technologies and different fields in an experiment without many of the common commercial limitations. The performance is centered in an eloquent choreography that stresses the desire to be expressive without bounds.

Motion data was captured using inexpensive sensors and that data paved the way through an extensive number of steps. Once all the scanned point cloud data was combined, that was then used as the base for the creative development on the piece. A series of iterative studies on styles followed and several techniques and dynamic simulations were then applied using a number 3D tools for various results.

You can see a making of video here. If you liked this you might also enjoy Walking City, Choros, or these 2013 idents for CCTV. (via Prosthetic Knowledge)

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A Bioluminescent Forest Created with Digital Projection Mapping 







While we’ve seen many examples of projection mapping on the sides of buildings or other relatively flat surfaces in an attempt to add depth or dimension, it seems photographers and digital artists are getting progressively more innovative as the technology continues to evolve. Last week we saw a commendable dance performance making use of projection mapping, and now photographer Tarek Mawad and animator Friedrich van Schoor just spent six weeks embedded in nature to create Bioluminescent Forest. The 4-minute short film imagines what various plants, insects, spiderwebs, and mushrooms might look like if they possessed the ability to emit bioluminescent light, creating a strange wonderland of blinking and twinkling organisms. The filmmakers state that everything you see was created live, without any effects added in post-production. You can watch a behind-the-scenes clip here. (via PetaPixel, The Kid Should See This)

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