Tag Archives: digital

Artist Alexey Kondakov Imagines Figures from Classical Paintings as Part of Contemporary Life

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For his ongoing series “Art History in Contemporary Life,” Ukrainian artist Alexey Kondakov takes scenes and figures lifted from classical paintings and drops them into modern-day life. Bouguereau’s Song of the Angels appears to take place on an empty subway car while a pair of men from Holbein’s famous The Ambassadors are transported to the table of a seedy bar. Much like Etienne Lavie’s billboard series and Julien de Casabianca’s recent Outings Project, the series creates an interesting and playful new context for artworks usually only encountered in museums and art history books. You can see more over on Facebook. (via Supersonic)

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Raw & Rendered: Experimental 3D Artworks by Joey Camacho

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In early 2014, Vancouver-based graphic artist Joey Camacho set out to learn more about rendering images using Cinema 4D and Octane Render, with the goal of creating a new piece each day. His first attempts were pretty rudimentary, but it wasn’t long before his exploration and experimentation began to pay off with increasinly subtle details inspired by biology, sound, and geometry. Only several months into his ‘Progress Before Perfection‘ project, he started getting requests for prints as his images were shared widely around Tumblr and elsewhere. You can see more of his work on Behance and prints of many pieces are available through his website.

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Asphyxia: A Striking Fusion of Dance and Motion Capture Technology

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Asphyxia is an experimental film project by Maria Takeuchi and Frederico Phillips that explores human movement through motion capture technology. The team used two inexpensive Xbox One Kinect sensors to capture the movements of dancer Shiho Tanaka and then rendered the data inside a near photo-realistic environment. From their description of the project:

The project is an effort to explore new ways to use and/or combine technologies and different fields in an experiment without many of the common commercial limitations. The performance is centered in an eloquent choreography that stresses the desire to be expressive without bounds.

Motion data was captured using inexpensive sensors and that data paved the way through an extensive number of steps. Once all the scanned point cloud data was combined, that was then used as the base for the creative development on the piece. A series of iterative studies on styles followed and several techniques and dynamic simulations were then applied using a number 3D tools for various results.

You can see a making of video here. If you liked this you might also enjoy Walking City, Choros, or these 2013 idents for CCTV. (via Prosthetic Knowledge)

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A Bioluminescent Forest Created with Digital Projection Mapping

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While we’ve seen many examples of projection mapping on the sides of buildings or other relatively flat surfaces in an attempt to add depth or dimension, it seems photographers and digital artists are getting progressively more innovative as the technology continues to evolve. Last week we saw a commendable dance performance making use of projection mapping, and now photographer Tarek Mawad and animator Friedrich van Schoor just spent six weeks embedded in nature to create Bioluminescent Forest. The 4-minute short film imagines what various plants, insects, spiderwebs, and mushrooms might look like if they possessed the ability to emit bioluminescent light, creating a strange wonderland of blinking and twinkling organisms. The filmmakers state that everything you see was created live, without any effects added in post-production. You can watch a behind-the-scenes clip here. (via PetaPixel, The Kid Should See This)

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Flowing City Maps Imagine the Influence of Cities on the Environment

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Rio de Janeiro

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As part of a new exhibition in Venice that explores the relationship between cities and inhabitants, digital artist and illustrator Istvan (previously) created a series of city maps that seem to bleed into their surroundings. The works aren’t scientific by any means, but are meant as a representation of how cities might affect the local environment. The maps were created digitally and printed on large slabs of acrylic glass for display as part of Contemporary Venice through January 2015. You can see much more over on Behance.

Digital Artist Giuseppe Randazzo Creates Elaborate Arrays of 3D-Printed Stones

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Stone Field 00 / exp00 – simple attractor exponential field. Digital rendering.

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Stone Field 05 / three attractors field. Digital rendering.

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Stone Field 04 / field based on vert dist from horizontal axis. Digital rendering.

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StoneFields 02 / polar 2d Perlin field. 3D-printed sculpture.

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Stone Field 00 / exp00 – simple attractor exponential field. 3D-printed sculpture.

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Stone Field 07 /simple 1d linear polar field. 3D-printed sculpture.

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Stone Field 07 /simple 1d linear polar field. 3D-printed sculpture, detail.

Back in 2009, Italian designer Giuseppe Randazzo of Novastructura released a series of generative digital “sculptures” that depicted carefully organized pebbles and rocks on a flat plane. Titled Stone Fields, the works were inspired in part by similar land art pieces by English sculptor Richard Long. As the images spread around the web (pre-dating this publication entirely) many people were somewhat disheartened to learn the images were created with software instead of tweezers, a testament to Randazzo’s C++ programming skills used to create a custom application that rendered 3D files based on a number of parameters.

Fast forward to 2014, and technology has finally caught up with Randazzo’s original vision. The designer recently teamed up with Shapeways to create physical prototypes of the Stone Fields project. He shares about the process:

Starting from 2009 project “Stone Fields”, some 3dmodels were produced from the original meshes. The conversion was rather difficult, the initial models weren’t created with 3dprinting in mind. The handling of millions of triangles and the check for errors required a complex process. Each model is 25cm x 25cm wide and was produced by Shapeways in polyamide (white strong & flexible). Subsequently they were painted with airbrush. […] The minute details of the original meshes were by far too tiny to be printed, however despite the small scale, these prototypes give an idea of the complexity of the gradients of artificial stones.

Watch the video above to see the sculptures up close, and you can see a few more photos over on Randazzo’s project site. If you liked this, also check out Lee Griggs.

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These Beautiful 3D Topographies Rendered by Lee Griggs Look Like Weather Patterns and Ocean Floors

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Madrid-based 3D artist Lee Griggs created some fascinating topographical illustrations using 3D animation and rendering software Maya Xgen and Arnold. Each piece is comprised of countless spheres, cylinders, or cubes that have been extruded and colored to create images reminiscent of ocean floors, bacterial growth, or even weather patterns. Griggs talks a bit more about how he renders these and shares a number of tutorials over on his blog. (via Colossal Submissions)

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