Tag Archives: digital

New Classical Paintings Reimagined as Part of Modern-Day Italian Life by Alexey Kondakov 

For his latest works in the ongoing series Art History in Contemporary Life, Ukrainian artist and designer Alexey Kondakov (previously here and here) has staged classical paintings in scenes from modern day Naples, Italy. The figures effortless merge with their present day surroundings, two women looking perfectly bored flipping through comic books in the back of a dusty book store, while a different woman takes a nap beside a latte and half-eaten sandwich. You can view more of his digitally altered scenes on his Instagram and Facebook page. (via My Modern Met)

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Photomontages That Trace Light Through Overgrown Countrysides and Abandoned Interiors 

"Thicket" (2015)

“Thicket” (2015), all images © Suzanne Moxhay

Artist Suzanne Moxhay produces photomontage scenes which seem to effortlessly combine elements from both her own photography practice and her large archive of collected images. To compose her taken and collected photographs, Moxhay relies on a film technique dating back to the early 20th century called matte painting, a process where backdrops are illustrated on glass panels and integrated into live-action sets. Using this method she creates the illusion that all of her disparate pictures are one cohesive image, first arranging the fragments on glass, then re-photographing the new configuration, and finally touching up the compositions digitally.

“In my recent work I have been exploring concepts of spatial containment in montages built from fragments of photographed and painted interiors,” says Moxhay. “Architectures are disrupted by anomalous elements – contradictory light sources, faulty perspective, paradoxes of scale. Light casts shadows in the wrong direction, walls fail to meet in corners, an area of the image can be seen either as an enclosing wall or dark overcast sky.”

Moxhay lives and works in London. You can see more of her photomontage scenes on her website. (via ArtistADay)

Eventide (2012)

“Eventide” (2012)

"Arch" (2016)

“Arch” (2016)

"Antechamber" (2014)

“Antechamber” (2014)

"Feralis" (2011)

“Feralis” (2011)

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Elegant Dimensional Renderings of Animals and People by Maxim Shkret 

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Moscow-based illustrator Maxim Shkret conjurs the flowing hair of people and the tangled fur of beasts in this lovely ongoing series of digital illustrations. Mixing a unique method of 3d modeling with carefully applied shadows, each piece evokes the form of a paper-like sculpture. You can see more on Shkret’s Instagram.

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Elegant Wireframe Animal Renderings by 3D Artist Mat Szulik 

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Freelance illustrator and 3D artist Mat Szulik (previously) creates incredibly realistic models, digitally rendering figures that appear as if they were formed from materials such as wood, and most recently wire. His latest project, titled The Wires v2, presents the outlines of forest creatures, horses, and beetles, each placed in stark, white environments or amongst trees built in the same style as the wire animals. The renderings are almost entirely silver wire, yet many also contain a gold core to add a further layer of dimensionality. You can see works from Szulik’s first wire series, The Wires v1, as well as other 3D projects on his Behance.

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Digital Artist Mike Winkelmann Creates Daily Conceptual Illustrations Spanning Nearly a Decade 

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For over 9 years, graphic designer and digital artist Mike Winkelmann (aka Beeple) has endeavored to create a new digital illustration every single day. From abstract blobs of metallic goo to fully-realized science fiction landscapes, Winkelmann shares every creation he makes in an uninterrupated stream online via Tumblr, Facebook and elsewhere. While some pieces are more successful than others, he says the daily act of creation is less about producing consistently solid work, and more about working through ideas, quickly working through the bad ones, and learning new tools or methods. The vast majority of what he imagines simply defies explanation or genre, and themes change dramatically from image to image. Winkelmann shares more about his process and tools in this interview with iO9. (via Behance)

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