Tag Archives: documentary

Perspective: Artist Zaria Forman Shares the Inspiration behind Her Large-Scale Pastel Waves and Icebergs

Perspective: Artist Zaria Forman Shares the Inspiration behind Her Large Scale Pastel Waves and Icebergs waves water pastel ice drawing documentary climate

Perspective: Artist Zaria Forman Shares the Inspiration behind Her Large Scale Pastel Waves and Icebergs waves water pastel ice drawing documentary climate

Perspective: Artist Zaria Forman Shares the Inspiration behind Her Large Scale Pastel Waves and Icebergs waves water pastel ice drawing documentary climate

As part of his ongoing Making Art series, filmmaker Jesse Brass sits down with artist Zaria Forman (previously) who discusses the inspiration and intent behind her giant pastel drawings of icebergs and ocean waves.

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Art and Craft: A Documentary about Mark Landis, One of the Most Prolific Art Forgers in U.S. History

Art and Craft: A Documentary about Mark Landis, One of the Most Prolific Art Forgers in U.S. History movies forgery documentary

Art and Craft: A Documentary about Mark Landis, One of the Most Prolific Art Forgers in U.S. History movies forgery documentary

Art and Craft is a new feature documentary about art forger Mark Landis (previously) who is arguably one of the most prolific art forgers in U.S. history, having tricked over 60 museums in 20 states into believing his masterfully created replicas are authentic artworks. The catch: so far, it appears Landis, who has been diagnosed as schizophrenic, has yet to commit a crime. While he’s caused headaches, confusion, and multi-year investigations, he has never sought to benefit or profit from his forgeries in any way. Instead, he enjoys the performative act of pretending to be a philanthropist who makes donations of obscure artwork to art institutions, many of which unknowingly exhibited the fakes, allowing Landis the secret thrill of seeing his work on display.

Art and Craft opens next month in a select number of theaters. (via Coudal)

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Residents of Rio de Janeiro Take to the Rooftops to Battle with Kites

For many of us, the idea of flying a kite involves stopping by a convenience store to purchase an inexpensive plastic kite emblazoned with a movie character, and heading over to the local park to launch it into the sky where it’s promptly swallowed by a tree. But for residents living in the crowded favelas of Rio de Janeiro, where resources and park space is scarce, flying kites is do or die. People of all ages take to the rooftops to fight with homemade kites using strings coated with wax and powdered glass in an attempt to cut the strings of competitors. Entire battles are fought between neighboring “turfs,” where real life conflicts between people and neighborhoods are settled through kite wars.

Filmmaker Guilherme Tensol, in collaboration with sports magazine Victory and Brazilian production company Mosquito Project, produced this stylized documentary short titled Kite Fight for the New York Times leading up to the World Cup a few weeks ago.

Residents of Rio de Janeiro Take to the Rooftops to Battle with Kites kites documentary Brazil

Residents of Rio de Janeiro Take to the Rooftops to Battle with Kites kites documentary Brazil

Residents of Rio de Janeiro Take to the Rooftops to Battle with Kites kites documentary Brazil

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A Tribute to Discomfort: Insights from National Geographic Photographer Cory Richards

A Tribute to Discomfort: Insights from National Geographic Photographer Cory Richards travel interview documentary adventure

A Tribute to Discomfort: Insights from National Geographic Photographer Cory Richards travel interview documentary adventure

A Tribute to Discomfort: Insights from National Geographic Photographer Cory Richards travel interview documentary adventure

A Tribute to Discomfort: Insights from National Geographic Photographer Cory Richards travel interview documentary adventure

A Tribute to Discomfort: Insights from National Geographic Photographer Cory Richards travel interview documentary adventure

At the age of 14, photographer Cory Richards had dropped out of high school and was technically homeless. His education, he says, was instead obtained through the observation of struggle. Through various forms of discomfort and adventure he would eventually become the first American to successfully summit an 8,000-meter peak in winter (Pakistan’s Gasherbrum II), and launch an incredible career in photography through the pages of National Geographic.

Brooklyn-based digital media company Blue Chalk recently sat down with Richards to discuss his motivations and driving desire to connect with the people he photographs. (via ISO 1200, PetaPixel)

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Valley of Dolls: A Bizarre Town in Japan Where an Artist is Replacing Departed Residents with Life-Sized Dolls

Valley of Dolls: A Bizarre Town in Japan Where an Artist is Replacing Departed Residents with Life Sized Dolls Japan dolls documentary

Valley of Dolls: A Bizarre Town in Japan Where an Artist is Replacing Departed Residents with Life Sized Dolls Japan dolls documentary

Valley of Dolls: A Bizarre Town in Japan Where an Artist is Replacing Departed Residents with Life Sized Dolls Japan dolls documentary

Valley of Dolls: A Bizarre Town in Japan Where an Artist is Replacing Departed Residents with Life Sized Dolls Japan dolls documentary

Valley of Dolls: A Bizarre Town in Japan Where an Artist is Replacing Departed Residents with Life Sized Dolls Japan dolls documentary

Valley of Dolls: A Bizarre Town in Japan Where an Artist is Replacing Departed Residents with Life Sized Dolls Japan dolls documentary

Valley of Dolls: A Bizarre Town in Japan Where an Artist is Replacing Departed Residents with Life Sized Dolls Japan dolls documentary

Valley of Dolls: A Bizarre Town in Japan Where an Artist is Replacing Departed Residents with Life Sized Dolls Japan dolls documentary

Valley of Dolls: A Bizarre Town in Japan Where an Artist is Replacing Departed Residents with Life Sized Dolls Japan dolls documentary
Photo by horiyan

This is one of those things you might never believe if somebody told you, and yet even when faced with the evidence in photos, video, or Google Maps, you find yourself questioning reality (and maybe shaking off a serious case of the heebie jeebies). Welcome to Nagoro, a small village tucked into the valleys of Shikoku, Japan, a place where old residents are being replaced by life-sized dolls.

The work is part of a project by longtime resident and artist Ayano Tsukimi who returned to the village after an 11-year absence to discover many of her old neighbors and friends had left for larger cities or simply passed away. The town itself is dying with a dwindling population of about 35 people.

While gardening one day, Tsukimi constructed a scarecrow in the image of her father and was suddenly struck with the idea to replace other friends and family members with similar dolls. Over 350 dolls and 10 years later, her work continues. She places each doll in a place she feels is important to the memory of that person, so strolling through the down you might discover these inanimate memorials working in fields, fishing in rivers, or passing time in chairs along the road.

Berlin-based filmmaker Fritz Schumann recently visited with the 64-year-old artist and shot the documentary short above. (via Dan Sinker, The Verge)

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Woman Creates Touching Animated Portrait of Her Grandmother Using Her Old Possessions

After the death of her grandmother in 2010, animator and illustrator Gemma Green-Hope was called to help sort through some of her remaining posessions. What she discovered evoked not only memories, but also resulted in a new understanding of who her grandmother was by cataloging the objects she left behind. Green-Hope transformed the old books, clothes, jewelry and photos into this touching stop-motion portrait. Also, spoiler: her grandmother shot a spider. (via Vimeo Staff Picks)

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Creative Compulsive Disorder: Remembering Zina Nicole Lahr

Creative Compulsive Disorder: Remembering Zina Nicole Lahr documentary creativity

Creative Compulsive Disorder: Remembering Zina Nicole Lahr documentary creativity

This short clip about artist and maker Zina Nicole Lahr may be as tragic as it is beautiful. Earlier this fall Lahr approached her friend Stormy Pyeatte and asked if they might shoot a quick video for her portfolio. The video was shot and edited in just two days and demonstrates Lahr’s insatiable desire to build, invent, and “bring life to something inanimate,” a process she called her “creative compulsive disorder.” Almost unthinkably, Lahr was killed in a hiking accident in Colorado on November 20th, a few weeks after this was shot.

I didn’t know Lahr, but if this brief glimpse into her life is any indicator it’s clear she possessed an extremely rare spirit that feels completely genuine and infectious. It seems she was involved in practically every genre of creativity we normally cover here on Colossal. Make the most out of every day, folks. Lahr certainly did.

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