Tag Archives: drawing

An Architect Maps the Familiar Urban Details of Cities onto Moonlike Globes 

planet-1

As part of his ongoing Globes series, London-based architect Amer TendToTravel sketches the familiar landmarks and textural street patterns of familiar cities onto tiny moon-sized spheres. Seen here are locales like Paris, Hong Kong, and Melbourne whose skyscrapers reach out like tiny spikes atop the Death Star. You can see more of his completed globes and works-in-progress on his website and on Instagram. If you liked this, also check out the work of Ben Sak. (via Colossal Submissions)

planet-2

planet-4

planet-3

See related posts on Colossal about , , .

Rebirth: Artist Manabu Ikeda Unveils a Monumental Pen & Ink Drawing Nearly 3.5 Years in the Making 

Rebirth, 2016. Pen & ink, 13 x 10' (300 x 100cm). Courtesy the Chazen Museum of Art.

Rebirth, 2016. Pen & ink, 13 x 10′ (300 x 100cm). Courtesy the Chazen Museum of Art.

The 2011 Tōhoku earthquake and tsunami in Japan was one of the most devastating environmental events of our time, with its overall impact rippling across the globe for years to come. But just as stated in Newton’s third law—for every action, there is an equal and opposite reaction—so too did the people of Japan respond to the magnitude of the destruction in an effort to rebuild their country anew as captured in this staggering new artwork by Manabu Ikeda titled Rebirth. Starting in July of 2013, Ikeda toiled away on the 13 x 10 foot piece for 10 hours a day inside a basement studio at the Chazen Museum of Art in Madison, Wisconsin. He finished work just last week.

process-4

Manabu Ikeda at work.

A video posted by Colossal (@colossal) on

At its core, Rebirth depicts a tree rising from the debris of the tsunami as enormous waves crash nearby, but a closer inspection reveals thousands of tiny details, the individual stories of anonymous people, plants, and animals as they fight for survival and try to return their world to a semblance of order. Ikeda says that in his work he seeks to replicate the beautiful chaos of life that rarely fits a simple linear narrative. Instead, everything crashes together and interacts in unknown and unexpected ways, an idea that applies directly to his process as he often doesn’t know what each day will bring as he works inch by inch on the near endless canvas before him.

manabu-final-detail-3

Rebirth, detail.

manabu-final-detail-4

Rebirth, detail.

While Ikeda sketches broad details in pencil on the canvas beforehand, he primarily works with pen and acrylic ink using various forms of cross-hatching and brushwork to fill areas so dense with details, the true nature of the artwork isn’t revealed until staring at it from only a few inches away. Mountains of vehicles, gnarled tree branches, and train tracks sit tangled at the base of a tree, and flower blooms comprised of umbrellas and emergency tents fill the sky above. Everywhere a collision of humankind and nature, for better or worse.

“My goal is to faithfully express my view of the world in my composition, but I don’t intentionally depict detailed images,” he tells the Chazen. “Because I see details when I observe things, rather than the whole, I find pen and ink to be the best tools to express how I see them.”

manabu-final-detail-2

Rebirth, detail.

manabu-final-detail

Rebirth, detail.

Rebirth, detail.

Rebirth, detail.

Rebirth in progress.

Rebirth in progress.

process-1

Rebirth in progress.

Ikeda’s time spent in Madison wasn’t without its own adversity. The artist dislocated a shoulder in a downhill skiing accident which rendered his dominant hand temporarily useless. Unable to stop work for very long, Ikeda began practicing with his other hand and after 3-4 practice drawings continued work on Rebirth unfazed.

Rebirth will be on view only briefly at the Chazen Museum of Art through December 11, 2016. If you’re anywhere near the midwest, this is well worth a trip and I strongly encourage you to stop by. You can explore it for over 30 minutes and still not see everything. You can also read more about it on Wisconsin Life.

process-2

Manabu Ikeda at work, still from Clayton Adams.

process-3

Manabu Ikeda at work, still from Clayton Adams.

test

Ikeda Manabu’s first attempt at drawing with his non-dominant hand after a skiing accident.

Film and stills courtesy Clayton Adams.

See related posts on Colossal about , , , , , .

Whimsical Storybook Beasts and Birds Illustrated by Vorja Sánchez 

vorja-1

Barcelona-based illustrator Vorja Sánchez depicts comically surreal storybook creatures that look like a cross between mutant dinosaurs and shadowy demons—but also captures the very lifelike spirit of birds and other animals. Working with a variety of mediums from pen and link to watercolor or spray paint, each piece is inspired by events in his daily life, an observation he makes while walking through the forest, or drawing from a recent stint living in Nicaragua where he organized painting classes for children and adults. Sánchez has just begun working as a full-time artist in the last few months and is currently wrapping up work on an illustrated book. You can follow more of his artwork on Facebook and Instagram.

vorja-1-detail

vorja-2

vorja-3

vorja-8

vorja-4

vorja-5

vorja-6

vorja-7

See related posts on Colossal about , , , .

A Life-Size Graphite Skeleton that Vibrates to Draw Itself into Nothingness 

batleskeleton_07

All images by Luke Abiol

Unlike the human body which is composed of only 18% carbon, Agelio Batle‘s latest project is produced from 100% of the semimetal material. The work, titled Ash Dancer, is a life-size skeleton that acts like a very large pencil. When placed on a custom made high-frequency vibrating table, the bones of the skeleton rub marks onto the surface, slowly creating an outline of its own form. The more the work rubs against the table, the more of itself is left behind, slowly transforming the graphite from sculpture to abstract drawings which Batle refers to as Ash Dances.

The piece is a part the exhibition “murmer | tremble” at Jack Fischer Gallery in San Francisco which opens November 5 and runs through December 29, 2016. You can see more work from Studio Batle on his website, and a number of his graphite objects are available in the Colossal Shop. (via This Isn’t Happiness)

batleskeleton_06

batleskeleton_02

batleskeleton_05

batleskeleton_03

batleskeleton_04

See related posts on Colossal about , , , , , , .

A Child’s Drawings Turned Into Realistic Imaginings of Animals, Cars, and People 

domdrawings_16

domdrawings_14

An artist is turning his 6-year-old son Dom’s wild imagination and childlike drawing skills into realistic renderings of animals and cars, transforming rough sketches into Photoshop masterpieces. The father and son pair have a project titled Things I Have Drawn, an account that chronicles their collaborative illustrations of misshapen dolphins, wobbly vehicles, and laughing lions. In addition to their drawings, Dom’s father also makes up rhymes for each of his son’s creations, bringing a storybook quality to each strange and endearing work. You can see more of their animal portraits on their Instagram @thingsihavedrawn. (via Designboom)

domdrawings_12

domdrawings_11

domdrawings_20

domdrawings_19

domdrawings_09

domdrawings_10

domdrawings_21

domdrawings_22

domdrawings

domdrawings_06

domdrawings_04

See related posts on Colossal about , , .

Miniature Pen & Ink Drawings of the Midwest by Taylor Mazer 

small-1

Michigan artist Taylor Mazer renders the seemingly mundane world of empty alleyways and nondescript buildings of the midwest in excruciating detail on a canvas scarcely larger than a few postage stamps. Working with a fine Micron pen he constructs old buildings brick by brick and casts entire drawings in deep shadow, forcing the viewer to explore the piece up-close to discover every minute detail. The cityscapes are devoid of people, instead focusing on architectural details, light, and the unknown forces—weather or otherwise—that force people indoors, or away altogether.

Mazer works as a freelance illustrator and artist and is currently adjunct faculty at Kendall College of Art and Design in Grand Rapids. You can see more of his work on Behance or Instagram, and many of his original drawings are available in his shop.

small-2

small-3

small-4

small-5

small-6

small-7

small-8

See related posts on Colossal about , .

Page 1 of 271234...»