Tag Archives: drawing

Prismatic Portraits by Lui Ferreyra Form a Collision of Geometry and Color 

Denver-based artist Lui Ferreyra (previously) has spent the last decade honing a technique that portrays faces, hands, and landscapes as dense fields of geometric color. While evoking a tone that clearly references the digital age, Ferreyra also draws inspiration from artists like Chuck Close and Egon Schiele who famously worked with aspects of pointillism and geometry. Seen here are a collection of drawings and sketches, but he utilizes a similar fragmentary style for oil paintings as well. You can follow Ferreyra on Instagram and see more of his work at William Havu Gallery.

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Larger-Than-Life Hyperrealistic Portraits Rendered in Graphite and Charcoal by Arinze Stanley 

Till He Comes, 2017. Progress photo. Graphite and charcoal pencils.

Nigerian artist Arinze Stanley works with graphite and charcoal pencils on large sheets of cartridge paper to render enormous portraits of his subjects. Spending upwards of 200 hours on an artwork, Stanley agonizes over the most minute details of each piece to painstakingly capture reflections of light, droplets of sweat, or tangles of hair.

Where some hyperrealistic artists lean towards idealized perfection, Stanley instead focuses on pure realism, infusing portraits with a raw sense of emotion and drama. The scale of each piece, always slightly larger than life, adds an uncanny three-dimensional aspect.

Stanley recently exhibited work at Omenka Gallery and you can see more of his works (and pieces in progress) on Facebook. (via ARTNAU, Juxtapoz)

Till He Comes, 2017. Progress photo. Graphite and charcoal pencils.

Till He Comes, 2017. Progress photo. Graphite and charcoal pencils.

Till He Comes, 2017. Progress photo. Graphite and charcoal pencils.

INSOMNIA, 2017. 27″ X 42″. Progress photo. Graphite and charcoal pencils on Strathmore 300 Bristol (smooth) paper.

INSOMNIA, 2017. 27″ X 42″. Progress photo. Graphite and charcoal pencils on Strathmore 300 Bristol (smooth) paper.

INSOMNIA, 2017. 27″ X 42″. Progress photo. Graphite and charcoal pencils on Strathmore 300 Bristol (smooth) paper.

Desolation, 2016. Progress photo. Graphite and charcoal pencils.

Desolation, 2016. Graphite and charcoal pencils.

FAMISHED (Disturbia series), 2016. Progress photo.

FAMISHED (Disturbia series), 2016. 26″ x 36″. Graphite and charcoal on Cartridge paper.

Innocence, 2016. 33” X 23.4″. White and black charcoal pencils and graphite pencils on Lambeth Cartridge paper.

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Two Decades of South Korean Corner Store Illustrations by Me Kyeoung Lee 

Artist Me Kyeoung Lee has spent the last two decades documenting the tiny convenience stores and corner shops that dot the streets of South Korea. She illustrates the stores, which are now quickly disappearing, with a dedication to the small details that make each unique. Mismatched chairs can be seen lined up out front, while tall cherry blossom or persimmon trees shade the buildings’ entrances.

Me Kyeoung Lee draws each of her illustrations with acrylic pens, and chooses to sketch each at noon to avoid the hazy shadows cast by early mornings or late afternoons. You can see more of her illustrated documentation on her website. (via Booooooom, Creative Boom)

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Mechanical Crustaceans with Clockwork Insides Illustrated by Steeven Salvat 

French artist Steeven Salvat has long been fascinated by the clarity and exactitude found in old biological studies. His portfolio is brimming with such renderings, usually with a modern twist such as this stunning series of decorative drawings on skateboard decks. For this new series titled Mechanical / Biological [Crustacean Study] , Salvat imagined intricate clockwork mechanisms that might animate the rigid exteriors of crabs, lobsters, and crayfish. The 10-piece collection was drawn entirely with a 0.13mm Rotring technical drawing pen, the process of which he captured in a video below. (via Colossal Submissions)

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A Peek Inside Ivan Belikov’s Sketchbooks of Intricate Birds & Beasts 

Here’s an eye-popping glimpse inside sketchbooks belonging to illustrator Ivan Belikov (previously) who depicts everything from the fragile wings of birds to the momentous weight of prehistoric creatures as they smash through buildings with delicate pencil strokes. He shares additional process photos and competed illustrations on Tumblr and over on Behance.

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Prismatic Sketches of Hands and Faces by Lui Ferreyra 

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Artist Lui Ferreyra draws colorful portraits of hands and faces, works that use discrete shapes of color as highlights and shadows. These geometric fragments are blended by the viewer’s eye rather than the artist’s hand, producing color fields that Ferreyra intends to call attention to the connection between seeing and language.

“There’s a double move at play here,” explains Ferreyra’s website about his work. “The first move is substantiated by a geometric matrix which functions as surface: it embraces and emphasizes the aspect of flatness within a complex network of geometric shapes, each unique unto itself. The second move is fulfilled by the cumulative effect of all the shapes functioning together as a color-field in which each shape contextualizes every other shape, thereby providing all the necessary visual cueing to manifest a kind of window one can look through. Surface and window, at and through, like language which points both at the world and back at itself.”

You can see more of Ferreyra’s colorful drawings, in addition to oil paintings, on InstagramFacebook, or William Havu Gallery where he is represented. (via This Isn’t Happiness)

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