Tag Archives: drawing

Headsongs: Graphite Portraits Morph into Landscapes

Headsongs: Graphite Portraits Morph into Landscapes portraits illustration drawing

Headsongs: Graphite Portraits Morph into Landscapes portraits illustration drawing

Headsongs: Graphite Portraits Morph into Landscapes portraits illustration drawing

Headsongs: Graphite Portraits Morph into Landscapes portraits illustration drawing

Headsongs: Graphite Portraits Morph into Landscapes portraits illustration drawing

Headsongs: Graphite Portraits Morph into Landscapes portraits illustration drawing

Headsongs: Graphite Portraits Morph into Landscapes portraits illustration drawing

Austria-based artist Stefan Zsaitsits creates large-scale graphite portraits of truly strange and wonderful characters whose bloated faces often transform into unexpected landscapes. Some of the artists earlier portraits from 2010-11 (not shown here) were collected into a book called Headsongs. See much more in his drawing and painting portfolios. If you liked this, also check out the work of Pat Perry.

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Deadpan Comedy: Surreal Drawing of a Dystopian Future by Samuel Gomez

Deadpan Comedy: Surreal Drawing of a Dystopian Future by Samuel Gomez surreal science fiction drawing

Deadpan Comedy: Surreal Drawing of a Dystopian Future by Samuel Gomez surreal science fiction drawing

Deadpan Comedy: Surreal Drawing of a Dystopian Future by Samuel Gomez surreal science fiction drawing

Deadpan Comedy: Surreal Drawing of a Dystopian Future by Samuel Gomez surreal science fiction drawing

Deadpan Comedy: Surreal Drawing of a Dystopian Future by Samuel Gomez surreal science fiction drawing

Deadpan Comedy: Surreal Drawing of a Dystopian Future by Samuel Gomez surreal science fiction drawing

Deadpan Comedy: Surreal Drawing of a Dystopian Future by Samuel Gomez surreal science fiction drawing

Deadpan Comedy: Surreal Drawing of a Dystopian Future by Samuel Gomez surreal science fiction drawing

While visiting ArtPrize this weekend I was captivated by this amazing graphite and ink drawing by New York artist Samuel Gomez. The surreal triptych titled Deadpan Comedy measures 18 x 5 feet and is meant as commentary on the negative effects of corporations and capitalism. Even standing in front of it I found it nearly impossible to identify every single detail as the piece is so dense with imagery and symbolism. You can see more of Gomez’s work over on Behance or Facebook.

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Meticulous Detailed Carpets Drawn with Bic Pens by Jonathan Bréchignac

Meticulous Detailed Carpets Drawn with Bic Pens by Jonathan Bréchignac drawing carpets

Meticulous Detailed Carpets Drawn with Bic Pens by Jonathan Bréchignac drawing carpets

Meticulous Detailed Carpets Drawn with Bic Pens by Jonathan Bréchignac drawing carpets

Meticulous Detailed Carpets Drawn with Bic Pens by Jonathan Bréchignac drawing carpets

Meticulous Detailed Carpets Drawn with Bic Pens by Jonathan Bréchignac drawing carpets

Meticulous Detailed Carpets Drawn with Bic Pens by Jonathan Bréchignac drawing carpets

Meticulous Detailed Carpets Drawn with Bic Pens by Jonathan Bréchignac drawing carpets

Meticulous Detailed Carpets Drawn with Bic Pens by Jonathan Bréchignac drawing carpets

Meticulous Detailed Carpets Drawn with Bic Pens by Jonathan Bréchignac drawing carpets

Meticulous Detailed Carpets Drawn with Bic Pens by Jonathan Bréchignac drawing carpets

Art director Jonathan Bréchignac of Paris-based design studio Joe & Nathan has been working on a series of drawn carpets using ballpoint Bic pens. The first four drawings were completed last year and were made to approximate the size of Muslim prayer carpets. Bréchignac says the various designs and patterns found in each piece were inspired by an amalgam of artistic forms and influences:

Painstakingly detailed, it explores different ways and patterns to create a unique whole with only a simple tool: the “Less is more” precept. The inspiration comes from different types of art (French roman, traditional Japanese, native American and Mexican) and also military camouflage and animal patterns. Together they create a mix of civilizations and religions bringing forth a new meaning to them.

A newer carpet, aptly titled Ultraviolet, was recently completed and will be on view at the Boghossian Foundation in Brussels through 2014. (via Juxtapoz, Yatzer)

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Photorealistic Color Drawings of Everyday Objects by Marcello Barenghi

Photorealistic Color Drawings of Everyday Objects by Marcello Barenghi  photorealism drawing

Photorealistic Color Drawings of Everyday Objects by Marcello Barenghi  photorealism drawing

Photorealistic Color Drawings of Everyday Objects by Marcello Barenghi  photorealism drawing

Photorealistic Color Drawings of Everyday Objects by Marcello Barenghi  photorealism drawing

Photorealistic Color Drawings of Everyday Objects by Marcello Barenghi  photorealism drawing

Photorealistic Color Drawings of Everyday Objects by Marcello Barenghi  photorealism drawing

Italian artist Marcello Barenghi draws incredibly realistic everyday objects that appear almost three dimensional with the help of colored pencils and occasional enhancements using markers or watercolor. Each work appears ever so slightly stylized which I think sets these apart from similar hyperrealistic drawings that are meant to ‘trick’ a viewer. If you want to see more, Barenghi runs a YouTube channel where he documents the process of almost every drawing. (via 2headedsnake)

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Ballpoint Barber: A Stop-Motion Reverse Haircut by Peter Simon

Ballpoint Barber: A Stop Motion Reverse Haircut by Peter Simon stop motion humor drawing beards

Ballpoint Barber: A Stop Motion Reverse Haircut by Peter Simon stop motion humor drawing beards

The ludicrous battle of haircut/shaving videos continues with an new stop-motion short from Peter Simon that was inspired by an old magnetic Wooly Willy toy. Simon previously created a video called Trim back in 2011 which might have been inspiration for Ben Garvin’s Magic Beard last month. Do we have a new genre on our hands? Music by Paul Otteson.

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Rainbow Pencils Made of Recycled Paper

Rainbow Pencils Made of Recycled Paper  rainbows pencils paper drawing

Rainbow Pencils Made of Recycled Paper  rainbows pencils paper drawing

Rainbow Pencils Made of Recycled Paper  rainbows pencils paper drawing

Rainbow Pencils Made of Recycled Paper  rainbows pencils paper drawing

Tokyo-based designer Duncan Shotton, known for his whimsical functional objects like the magnetic cloud keyholder and his Lochness monster pins, just launched a Kickstarter Project for a new kind of pencil that makes rainbows when you sharpen it. Each pencil has a 6-layer rainbow core of recycled paper (not wood) and either a white or black exterior. Shotton says the pencils will ship before Christmas.

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Artist Collaborates with her 4-Year-Old Daughter to Create Amazing Illustrations

Artist Collaborates with her 4 Year Old Daughter to Create Amazing Illustrations kids illustration drawing

Artist Collaborates with her 4 Year Old Daughter to Create Amazing Illustrations kids illustration drawing

Artist Collaborates with her 4 Year Old Daughter to Create Amazing Illustrations kids illustration drawing

Artist Collaborates with her 4 Year Old Daughter to Create Amazing Illustrations kids illustration drawing

Artist Collaborates with her 4 Year Old Daughter to Create Amazing Illustrations kids illustration drawing

Artist Collaborates with her 4 Year Old Daughter to Create Amazing Illustrations kids illustration drawing

Artist Collaborates with her 4 Year Old Daughter to Create Amazing Illustrations kids illustration drawing

In one of the best collaborations this blog has seen in ages, professional illustrator Mica Angela Hendricks has been collaborating with her 4-year-old daughter on a series of wonderful drawings that pass back and forther between mother and daugher until reaching an always unexpected final form. Each drawing begins with Hendricks drawing a detailed retro-ish head, after which her daughter snatches away the sketchbook to create rudimentary body (or animal!) parts as well as other random details. Afterward Hendricks goes back in to polish things up a bit and behold: dinosaur women, slug ladies, and beaver astronauts are born. Of the collaboration Hendricks shares:

Sometimes I would give her suggestions, like “maybe she could have a dragon body!” but usually she would ignore theses suggestions if it didn’t fit in with what she already had in mind. But since I am a grownup and a little bit (okay a lot) of a perfectionist, I sometimes would have a specific idea in mind as I doodled my heads. Maybe she could make this into a bug! I’d think happily to myself as I sketched, imagining the possibilities of what it could look like. So later, when she’d doodle some crazy shape that seemed to go in some surrealistic direction, or put a large circle around the creature and filled the WHOLE THING in with marker, part of my brain would think, What is she DOING?!? She’s just scribbling it all up! But I should know that in most instances, kids’ imaginations way outweigh a grownup’s, and it always ALWAYS looked better that what I had imagined. ALWAYS.

Kind of reminds me of Rob Kimmel’s collaboration with his son or even Axe Cop. If you’re interested, Hendricks just published 16 of their illustrations as prints over on Society6. (via Visual News, Neatorama)

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