drawing

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Illustration

Mechanical Crustaceans with Clockwork Insides Illustrated by Steeven Salvat

February 13, 2017

Christopher Jobson

French artist Steeven Salvat has long been fascinated by the clarity and exactitude found in old biological studies. His portfolio is brimming with such renderings, usually with a modern twist such as this stunning series of decorative drawings on skateboard decks. For this new series titled Mechanical / Biological [Crustacean Study] , Salvat imagined intricate clockwork mechanisms that might animate the rigid exteriors of crabs, lobsters, and crayfish. The 10-piece collection was drawn entirely with a 0.13mm Rotring technical drawing pen, the process of which he captured in a video below. (via Colossal Submissions)

 

 



Illustration

A Peek Inside Ivan Belikov’s Sketchbooks of Intricate Birds & Beasts

January 2, 2017

Christopher Jobson

Here’s an eye-popping glimpse inside sketchbooks belonging to illustrator Ivan Belikov (previously) who depicts everything from the fragile wings of birds to the momentous weight of prehistoric creatures as they smash through buildings with delicate pencil strokes. He shares additional process photos and competed illustrations on Tumblr and over on Behance.

 

 



Art Illustration

Prismatic Sketches of Hands and Faces by Lui Ferreyra

December 22, 2016

Kate Sierzputowski

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Artist Lui Ferreyra draws colorful portraits of hands and faces, works that use discrete shapes of color as highlights and shadows. These geometric fragments are blended by the viewer’s eye rather than the artist’s hand, producing color fields that Ferreyra intends to call attention to the connection between seeing and language.

“There’s a double move at play here,” explains Ferreyra’s website about his work. “The first move is substantiated by a geometric matrix which functions as surface: it embraces and emphasizes the aspect of flatness within a complex network of geometric shapes, each unique unto itself. The second move is fulfilled by the cumulative effect of all the shapes functioning together as a color-field in which each shape contextualizes every other shape, thereby providing all the necessary visual cueing to manifest a kind of window one can look through. Surface and window, at and through, like language which points both at the world and back at itself.”

You can see more of Ferreyra’s colorful drawings, in addition to oil paintings, on InstagramFacebook, or William Havu Gallery where he is represented. (via This Isn’t Happiness)

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Art Illustration

Artist Vasco Mourao Illustrates ‘Infinite’ Skyscrapers on Circular Pieces of Plywood

December 20, 2016

Christopher Jobson

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As part of his new series titled Ouroborus, Barcelona-based artist Vasco Mourao (aka Mister Mourao) drew intricate buildings that flow in a continuous loop on pieces of cut plywood. He refers to himself as “an architect turned into an illustrator with a tendency for obsessive drawing,” and such a description couldn’t be more accurate. Mourao’s dense structural designs have also been executed on walls, paper, and other canvases and just barely seem contained on these wooden circuits.

The Ouroborus series was recently on view at Espacio 88 in Barcelona, and a few of the original works are still available in his online shop. (via Hi-Fructose)

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Art Illustration

An Architect Maps the Familiar Urban Details of Cities onto Moonlike Globes

November 29, 2016

Christopher Jobson

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As part of his ongoing Globes series, London-based architect Amer TendToTravel sketches the familiar landmarks and textural street patterns of familiar cities onto tiny moon-sized spheres. Seen here are locales like Paris, Hong Kong, and Melbourne whose skyscrapers reach out like tiny spikes atop the Death Star. You can see more of his completed globes and works-in-progress on his website and on Instagram. If you liked this, also check out the work of Ben Sak. (via Colossal Submissions)

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Art

Rebirth: Artist Manabu Ikeda Unveils a Monumental Pen & Ink Drawing Nearly 3.5 Years in the Making

November 28, 2016

Christopher Jobson

Rebirth, 2016. Pen & ink, 13 x 10' (300 x 100cm). Courtesy the Chazen Museum of Art.

Rebirth, 2016. Pen & ink, 13 x 10′ (300 x 100cm). Courtesy the Chazen Museum of Art.

The 2011 Tōhoku earthquake and tsunami in Japan was one of the most devastating environmental events of our time, with its overall impact rippling across the globe for years to come. But just as stated in Newton’s third law—for every action, there is an equal and opposite reaction—so too did the people of Japan respond to the magnitude of the destruction in an effort to rebuild their country anew as captured in this staggering new artwork by Manabu Ikeda titled Rebirth. Starting in July of 2013, Ikeda toiled away on the 13 x 10 foot piece for 10 hours a day inside a basement studio at the Chazen Museum of Art in Madison, Wisconsin. He finished work just last week.

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Manabu Ikeda at work.

A video posted by Colossal (@colossal) on

At its core, Rebirth depicts a tree rising from the debris of the tsunami as enormous waves crash nearby, but a closer inspection reveals thousands of tiny details, the individual stories of anonymous people, plants, and animals as they fight for survival and try to return their world to a semblance of order. Ikeda says that in his work he seeks to replicate the beautiful chaos of life that rarely fits a simple linear narrative. Instead, everything crashes together and interacts in unknown and unexpected ways, an idea that applies directly to his process as he often doesn’t know what each day will bring as he works inch by inch on the near endless canvas before him.

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Rebirth, detail.

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Rebirth, detail.

While Ikeda sketches broad details in pencil on the canvas beforehand, he primarily works with pen and acrylic ink using various forms of cross-hatching and brushwork to fill areas so dense with details, the true nature of the artwork isn’t revealed until staring at it from only a few inches away. Mountains of vehicles, gnarled tree branches, and train tracks sit tangled at the base of a tree, and flower blooms comprised of umbrellas and emergency tents fill the sky above. Everywhere a collision of humankind and nature, for better or worse.

“My goal is to faithfully express my view of the world in my composition, but I don’t intentionally depict detailed images,” he tells the Chazen. “Because I see details when I observe things, rather than the whole, I find pen and ink to be the best tools to express how I see them.”

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Rebirth, detail.

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Rebirth, detail.

Rebirth, detail.

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Rebirth in progress.

Rebirth in progress.

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Rebirth in progress.

Ikeda’s time spent in Madison wasn’t without its own adversity. The artist dislocated a shoulder in a downhill skiing accident which rendered his dominant hand temporarily useless. Unable to stop work for very long, Ikeda began practicing with his other hand and after 3-4 practice drawings continued work on Rebirth unfazed.

Rebirth will be on view only briefly at the Chazen Museum of Art through December 11, 2016. If you’re anywhere near the midwest, this is well worth a trip and I strongly encourage you to stop by. You can explore it for over 30 minutes and still not see everything. You can also read more about it on Wisconsin Life.

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Manabu Ikeda at work, still from Clayton Adams.

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Manabu Ikeda at work, still from Clayton Adams.

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Ikeda Manabu’s first attempt at drawing with his non-dominant hand after a skiing accident.

Film and stills courtesy Clayton Adams.

 

 



Art Illustration

Whimsical Storybook Beasts and Birds Illustrated by Vorja Sánchez

November 22, 2016

Christopher Jobson

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Barcelona-based illustrator Vorja Sánchez depicts comically surreal storybook creatures that look like a cross between mutant dinosaurs and shadowy demons—but also captures the very lifelike spirit of birds and other animals. Working with a variety of mediums from pen and link to watercolor or spray paint, each piece is inspired by events in his daily life, an observation he makes while walking through the forest, or drawing from a recent stint living in Nicaragua where he organized painting classes for children and adults. Sánchez has just begun working as a full-time artist in the last few months and is currently wrapping up work on an illustrated book. You can follow more of his artwork on Facebook and Instagram.

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A Colossal

Highlight

Brick Man