Tag Archives: drawing

Elaborate New Portraits Drawn on Vintage Maps by Ed Fairburn 

Peak District, 2013. Pencil on a contoured map of the Peak District. 47 x 35in (120 x 90cm)

Colorado Geological, 2013. Pencil on a geological map of Colorado, the first of a series of works exclusive to the Mike Wright Gallery in Denver, Colorado.

Bristol Envelope, 2013. A small portrait, produced in ink on an original street map of Bristol (UK) – this was later cut and folded to form an envelope, combining the current map works produced by Fairburn and a previous project—postal art.

Yr Ods EP Cover, 2013. Pencil on contoured maps showing parts of Wales, produced for Welsh Band Yr Ods.

Shrewsbury, 2013. Progress shot, ink on a street map of Shrewsbury.

Innsbruck, 2013. Ink on a contoured map of Innsbruck/surrounding area, 20 x 20in (52 x 52cm) approx. Lines of elevation have been followed with a pen, the width of each line has been altered accordingly to build the different tones.

Pontypridd, 2013. Pencil on a contoured map of Pontypridd, South Wales (UK).

Solihull, 2013. Progress shot of a past experiment in inks.

Using a wide variety of canvases including railroad blueprints, star charts, geological and street maps, Welsh artist Ed Fairburn (previously here and here) uses additive and subtractive techniques to create portraits that seem pefectly integrated with the topography of streets, mountains and rivers. It’s been almost a year since we last checked in with Fairburn whose process and approach to creating these stunning portraits continues to evolve. One of his most striking methods is to carefully follow map contours with a pen creating rows of lines that vary by width to create individual forms and shadows. The final portraits are so entwined with the map, it becomes hard to imagine one existing without the other.

You can see Fairburn’s work for yourself at Mike Wright Gallery in Denver, Colorado and he also has prints available here.

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New Ornate Insects Drawn by Alex Konahin 










Latvia-based graphic artist and illustrator Alex Konahin (previously) recently completed work on a new series of ornate insect drawings titled Little Wings. The illustrations were made using pens and india ink in his distinctive style that makes used of ornate scrolls and intricate floral designs. If this is the first time you’ve seen Konahin’s work, be sure to check out his amazing Anatomy drawings, and you can also see lots more on Facebook and Tumblr. (via Faith is Torment)

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Circuit Scribe: Instantly Draw Functional Electrical Circuits on a Piece of Paper 




The folks over at Urbana-based Electroninks Incorporated just launched a Kickstarter project for a new kind of pen that draws fuctional electronic circuits instantly. Called the Circuit Scribe, the handy little device works like a regular ballpoint pen and releases a non-toxic conductive silver ink that dries instantly. Via Kickstarter:

Circuit Scribe is for Makers, STEM Educators, Artists, Kids, & Life Hackers. We wanted to make it easier for Makers to Make. No shaking, no squeezing, no goop, no smell, no waiting for ink to dry. Circuit Scribe draws smooth lines with conductive silver ink and allows you to create functioning circuits instantly.

The project went viral immediately easily surpassed its $85,000 goal within a day or so. Watch the video above or learn more about it here.

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Headsongs: Graphite Portraits Morph into Landscapes 








Austria-based artist Stefan Zsaitsits creates large-scale graphite portraits of truly strange and wonderful characters whose bloated faces often transform into unexpected landscapes. Some of the artists earlier portraits from 2010-11 (not shown here) were collected into a book called Headsongs. See much more in his drawing and painting portfolios. If you liked this, also check out the work of Pat Perry.

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Deadpan Comedy: Surreal Drawing of a Dystopian Future by Samuel Gomez 









While visiting ArtPrize this weekend I was captivated by this amazing graphite and ink drawing by New York artist Samuel Gomez. The surreal triptych titled Deadpan Comedy measures 18 x 5 feet and is meant as commentary on the negative effects of corporations and capitalism. Even standing in front of it I found it nearly impossible to identify every single detail as the piece is so dense with imagery and symbolism. You can see more of Gomez’s work over on Behance or Facebook.

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Meticulous Detailed Carpets Drawn with Bic Pens by Jonathan Bréchignac 











Art director Jonathan Bréchignac of Paris-based design studio Joe & Nathan has been working on a series of drawn carpets using ballpoint Bic pens. The first four drawings were completed last year and were made to approximate the size of Muslim prayer carpets. Bréchignac says the various designs and patterns found in each piece were inspired by an amalgam of artistic forms and influences:

Painstakingly detailed, it explores different ways and patterns to create a unique whole with only a simple tool: the “Less is more” precept. The inspiration comes from different types of art (French roman, traditional Japanese, native American and Mexican) and also military camouflage and animal patterns. Together they create a mix of civilizations and religions bringing forth a new meaning to them.

A newer carpet, aptly titled Ultraviolet, was recently completed and will be on view at the Boghossian Foundation in Brussels through 2014. (via Juxtapoz, Yatzer)

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Photorealistic Color Drawings of Everyday Objects by Marcello Barenghi 







Italian artist Marcello Barenghi draws incredibly realistic everyday objects that appear almost three dimensional with the help of colored pencils and occasional enhancements using markers or watercolor. Each work appears ever so slightly stylized which I think sets these apart from similar hyperrealistic drawings that are meant to ‘trick’ a viewer. If you want to see more, Barenghi runs a YouTube channel where he documents the process of almost every drawing. (via 2headedsnake)

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