Tag Archives: drawing

Rainscapes: Hyperrealistic Rainy Windshield Drawings by Elizabeth Patterson

Rainscapes: Hyperrealistic Rainy Windshield Drawings by Elizabeth Patterson water rain landscapes hyperrealism drawing
West Duval Street, Lake City, 2013 / Color pencil and solvent on strathmore bristol vellum. © Elizabeth Patterson, courtesy Louis Stern Fine Arts.

Rainscapes: Hyperrealistic Rainy Windshield Drawings by Elizabeth Patterson water rain landscapes hyperrealism drawing
West Duval Street, Lake City, 2013 (detail) © Elizabeth Patterson, courtesy Louis Stern Fine Arts.

Rainscapes: Hyperrealistic Rainy Windshield Drawings by Elizabeth Patterson water rain landscapes hyperrealism drawing
Black Lake Road, Odessa, 2013 / Color pencil and solvent on Strathmore bristol vellum. © Elizabeth Patterson, courtesy Louis Stern Fine Arts.

Rainscapes: Hyperrealistic Rainy Windshield Drawings by Elizabeth Patterson water rain landscapes hyperrealism drawing
Black Lake Road, Odessa, 2013 (detail) © Elizabeth Patterson, courtesy Louis Stern Fine Arts.

Rainscapes: Hyperrealistic Rainy Windshield Drawings by Elizabeth Patterson water rain landscapes hyperrealism drawing
Wilshire Boulevard, Beverly Hills, 2013 / Color pencil and solvent on strathmore bristol vellum. © Elizabeth Patterson, courtesy Louis Stern Fine Arts.

Rainscapes: Hyperrealistic Rainy Windshield Drawings by Elizabeth Patterson water rain landscapes hyperrealism drawing
Wilshire Boulevard, Beverly Hills, 2013 (detail) © Elizabeth Patterson, courtesy Louis Stern Fine Arts.

Rainscapes: Hyperrealistic Rainy Windshield Drawings by Elizabeth Patterson water rain landscapes hyperrealism drawing
Bay Bridge, San Francisco, 2013 / Color pencil and solvent on strathmore bristol vellum. © Elizabeth Patterson, courtesy Louis Stern Fine Arts.

Rainscapes: Hyperrealistic Rainy Windshield Drawings by Elizabeth Patterson water rain landscapes hyperrealism drawing
Ventura Freeway V, 2013 / Colored pencil and solvent on Strathmore bristol vellum. © Elizabeth Patterson, courtesy Louis Stern Fine Arts.

Fascinated by the texture and color of water artist Elizabeth Patterson challenged herself to recreate the absurdly complex formation of water droplets on rain-streaked windshields. Her ongoing series titled Rainscapes blends drawing, hyperrealism, and traditional landscape techniques resulting in images that can be seen as both real and abstract.

Patterson begins with her own photography and often utilizes several images for a single drawing, finding the details and patterns that feel right for each composition. Interestingly, the precise nature of the sharpened pencils results in drawings that are more detailed than her source material. You can see more of her work on her website as well as Louis Stern Fine Arts. You can also catch a brief video interview with the artist courtesy La galerie Louis Carré. (thnx, choon)

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30 Hour Drawing Time-lapse by Paul White

30 Hour Drawing Time lapse by Paul White timelapse drawing decay cars

30 Hour Drawing Time lapse by Paul White timelapse drawing decay cars

I love to watch artists work and this time-lapse video by Australian artist Paul White white is no exception. Filmed by Johnny Blank over 30 hours it captures White working on a pencil drawing of a single wrecked vehicle, a theme of transportation meets decay that plays a prominent role in much of his artwork. The video was shown as part of a recent presentation at Semi-Permanent in Sydney earlier this month and is best viewed full-screen with HD turned on so you can see the finer details. See much more of his work here.

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A New Illustration of Hybrid Beasts and Imaginary Creatures by Imarginal

A New Illustration of Hybrid Beasts and Imaginary Creatures by Imarginal illustration drawing

A New Illustration of Hybrid Beasts and Imaginary Creatures by Imarginal illustration drawing

A New Illustration of Hybrid Beasts and Imaginary Creatures by Imarginal illustration drawing

A New Illustration of Hybrid Beasts and Imaginary Creatures by Imarginal illustration drawing

A New Illustration of Hybrid Beasts and Imaginary Creatures by Imarginal illustration drawing

A New Illustration of Hybrid Beasts and Imaginary Creatures by Imarginal illustration drawing

I had to pick up my jaw when this image first appeared in my inbox this morning. The density, detail and subject matter was so instantly compelling I was fascinated to learn about the artist behind it. As it turns out, this is the latest illustration from a duo of illustrators from Brazil named Fernando Moraes and Raone Ferreira who work under the collective title Imarginal. The two have a unique style of working in tandem on artworks such as the piece above which took three months of 8-10 hour days to complete and measures 1 x 0.7 meters (a little over 3 feet wide). I’m told via email that their illustrations are “characterized by overvaluation of details, imaginary creatures and ideas hybridism, thought by two different minds and made in four hands, using nankin [cotton fabric], poscas [markers] and even magnifiers on paper, wood or walls.” To see how they work together you can watch this video and see a gallery of their work here. (via colossal submissions)

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Trace What You See: The NeoLucida is the First Portable Camera Lucida to be Manufactured in Nearly a Century

Trace What You See: The NeoLucida is the First Portable Camera Lucida to be Manufactured in Nearly a Century drawing machines drawing device

Trace What You See: The NeoLucida is the First Portable Camera Lucida to be Manufactured in Nearly a Century drawing machines drawing device

Trace What You See: The NeoLucida is the First Portable Camera Lucida to be Manufactured in Nearly a Century drawing machines drawing device

Trace What You See: The NeoLucida is the First Portable Camera Lucida to be Manufactured in Nearly a Century drawing machines drawing device

Trace What You See: The NeoLucida is the First Portable Camera Lucida to be Manufactured in Nearly a Century drawing machines drawing device

Years before the first photographic print and two centuries before Google Glass, was the Camera Lucida, a clever optical device designed by Sir William Hyde Wollaston that utilized a prism to project an image onto a piece of paper so you can trace it, a method that would transform life-drawing for nearly a century. Have you ever used one or seen for sale? Likely not. Your best chance would be scouring Ebay where antique Camera Lucidas sell for upwards of $300. Enter university professors Pablo Garcia (previously) from the Art Institute of Chicago and Golan Levin from Carnegie Mellon who have teamed up to design the NeoLucida, the first portable camera lucida in nearly a century.

So what’s the point? In the age of Google Glass, Oculus Rift, and Instagram who needs to sit down and draw what’s in front of them? The duo explains via Kickstarter:

We both have a lot of students who’ve come to believe that being able to draw photo-realistically is the most important thing. We both love realistic drawing, but not necessarily the way it’s usually taught—which often ignores the tightly-intertwined relationship between drawing and imaging technologies. In particular, art students are encouraged to draw photo-realistically, in the manner of the Old Masters, but without the proper tools for doing so. So we’re producing the NeoLucida as a provocation, not as a business, to help get this discussion started. We hope the NeoLucida will prompt new questions about the relationship of art and technology—and potentially even disrupt business-as-usual in the classroom. Most importantly, we genuinely believe that using a camera lucida will profoundly change how people see, how they draw, and how they think about art.

Lastly, is there really a demand for a simple $30 drawing device based on a little prism? The Kickstarter received pledges for almost 100 of them while I wrote this post. So there’s that.

Update: The Neo Lucida is now available in the Colossal Shop.

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Graphic Designer Dad Illustrates His Kids’ Lunch Bags Almost Every Day Since 2008

Graphic Designer Dad Illustrates His Kids Lunch Bags Almost Every Day Since 2008 kids illustration food drawing

Graphic Designer Dad Illustrates His Kids Lunch Bags Almost Every Day Since 2008 kids illustration food drawing

Graphic Designer Dad Illustrates His Kids Lunch Bags Almost Every Day Since 2008 kids illustration food drawing

Graphic Designer Dad Illustrates His Kids Lunch Bags Almost Every Day Since 2008 kids illustration food drawing

Graphic designer and competitor for Best Dad Ever David LaFerriere has been drawing illustrations on his children’s sandwich bags since 2008. Lucky for us he photographs almost every single one, over 1,100 of which you can explore over on Flickr. (via quipsologies)

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The Colored Pencil Drawings of Marco Mazzoni Depict the Cycles of Nature

The Colored Pencil Drawings of Marco Mazzoni Depict the Cycles of Nature still life nature drawing

The Colored Pencil Drawings of Marco Mazzoni Depict the Cycles of Nature still life nature drawing

The Colored Pencil Drawings of Marco Mazzoni Depict the Cycles of Nature still life nature drawing

The Colored Pencil Drawings of Marco Mazzoni Depict the Cycles of Nature still life nature drawing

The Colored Pencil Drawings of Marco Mazzoni Depict the Cycles of Nature still life nature drawing

The Colored Pencil Drawings of Marco Mazzoni Depict the Cycles of Nature still life nature drawing

The Colored Pencil Drawings of Marco Mazzoni Depict the Cycles of Nature still life nature drawing

The Colored Pencil Drawings of Marco Mazzoni Depict the Cycles of Nature still life nature drawing

The Colored Pencil Drawings of Marco Mazzoni Depict the Cycles of Nature still life nature drawing

Milan-based artist Marco Mazzoni works almost exclusively with colored pencils to create intricate drawings that depict the cycles of nature and worlds based heavily in Italian folklore. One of his most frequent subjects are drawings of flora and fauna who seem to be consuming or living on top of the face of a woman whose eyes we never see. The artist says he consciously does not depict the eyes so the viewer doesn’t consider the artwork a portait, but instead a still life where all elements have equal importance. Via Galleria Patricia Armocida:

Mazzoni weaves a world based on Italian folklore, made up of Janas and Cogas, female figures who, according to Sardinian beliefs, seduce, enchant, curse, and heal. His work is an homage to the secret art of healers; each drawing is saturated with metaphors that tell their story. The circular compositions, which allude to the cycles of Nature, depict medicinal and lysergic plants, pollinator butterflies and birds which drink their nectar, and hidden amidst leaves and wings emerge the faces of these women forced to hide their sensuality and their knowledge due to bigotry imposed by religion, accused of witchcraft because they are herbarie, herbalists. Female healers and midwives held an important role within the community. [...] Marco Mazzoni underlines the importance of the interaction between the women and the plants by developing the subject that’s best known: the female face framed by flora and fauna, rendering it an icon. He reveals her innermost perceptions, memories scribbled on a diary page, highly imaginative visions of “impossible” animals, the fruit of ecstatic exploration of hallucinatory journeys. [...] The result is a work which recounts the moment in which woman takes control of everything, in complete harmony with Nature.

Mazzoni currently has a solo show in Milan at Galleria Patricia Armocida which runs through May 4th, 2013. You can see more of his work over on Facebook.

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The Human Printer: CMYK Halftone Prints Recreated by Hand

The Human Printer: CMYK Halftone Prints Recreated by Hand printers multiples halftone drawing

The Human Printer: CMYK Halftone Prints Recreated by Hand printers multiples halftone drawing

The Human Printer: CMYK Halftone Prints Recreated by Hand printers multiples halftone drawing

The Human Printer: CMYK Halftone Prints Recreated by Hand printers multiples halftone drawing

The Human Printer: CMYK Halftone Prints Recreated by Hand printers multiples halftone drawing

The Human Printer: CMYK Halftone Prints Recreated by Hand printers multiples halftone drawing

The Human Printer: CMYK Halftone Prints Recreated by Hand printers multiples halftone drawing

The Human Printer is an ongoing art project by Stinsensqueeze (STSQ) who take photographs and manually create a CMYK halftone printing effect by hand. CMYK refers to the four inks used in some color printing: cyan, magenta, yellow, and key (black)—the application of which is usually determined by computers, not people. The process of applying each dot by hand as you can imagine is a painfully tedious process that requires not only a knowledge of printing but also plenty of forethought before beginning each piece. You can see a rough idea of the process in the video above.

The Human Printer was setup in 2009 by Louise Naunton Morgan and having setup a design studio with Stina Gromark, the project is now run by Stinsensqueeze (STSQ). According to their website they are currently taking orders, all you have to do is upload an image that meets their requirements, select a color process, and they’ll get back to you with a quote. (via jeannie jeannie)

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