drawing

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Art Illustration

Tiny Ink Drawings Scaled to the Size of Pencils, Fingers, and Matchsticks by Christian Watson

March 21, 2016

Kate Sierzputowski

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All images courtesy of Christian Watson (@1924us)

Christian Watson, illustrator and owner of 1924, posts images to Instagram multiple times a day, pictures that showcase his cross-country adventures, vintage cameras, and sporadically his own miniature ink drawings that are often less than a half an inch tall. The tiny illustrations seem to mimic the rustic adventures found in his photographs—pulling in log cabins, lighthouses, and animals that teeter on the tip of his pencils or crawl to the top of his fingers. Take a look at more of Watson’s hand lettering and micro illustrations on his Instagram. (via Arch Atlas)

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Amazing Art Design Science

Crank Out Infinite Geometric Designs With The Wooden Cycloid Drawing Machine

March 14, 2016

Kate Sierzputowski

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Cycloid Drawing Machine, all images provided by LEAFpdx

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Looking more like a vintage turn table than drawing device, the Cycloid Drawing Machine is inspired by drawing machines from the late 19th and early 20th centuries, long before the invention of the Spirograph. Although these early toys like the harmonograph also produced complex designs, they were limited in scope. The Cycloid Drawing adjusts this previous oversight by utilizing a moving fulcrum and providing several interchangeable gears to make the machine infinitely adjustable.

Like its ancestors, this drawing machine by LEAFpdx requires no electricity and has no motors. To start one of its complex drawings all you must do is crank it by hand. The set comes with the base, three geared turntables, 18 gears, colored pens and test paper to allow for a customized device. To watch the machine’s set-up and see it in action, watch the video posted below. (via My Modern Met)

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Art Illustration

The Black and White Anthropomorphic Illustrations of David Álvarez

January 28, 2016

Kate Sierzputowski

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All images courtesy of David Álvarez. This image was made in collaboration with Julia D

David Álvarez produces soft illustrations that seem to glow despite their often limited color palette of black and white. The graphite scenes depict animals either interacting with or as humans, often donning elaborate garments while engaged in activities such as dancing or reading books.

“I always found it amazing how artists worked in the earlier days, I think of the technological limitations and how it took talent, skill, and patience to develop works of great complexity,” Álvarez told Colossal. “That was one reason why, since I was a student, I felt interest in figurative drawing for handling light and shadow. At school I discovered graphite and its possibilities. When I started working on my own I noticed that my personality and my way of working suited that particular technique.”

Mesoamerica is one of the illustrator’s favorite subjects to produce works around. Recently he created a book surrounding Mesoamerican myth titled Ancient Night that follows a rabbit and opossum’s adventures with pulque, a fermented prehispanic beverage.

Seen here are a number of collaborations with illustrator Julia Diaz. You can explore more of Álvarez’s illustrations on his Instagram and blog.

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David Álvarez in collaboration with Julia D

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Illustration

Millions of Hand-Inked Dots Comprised this New Stippled Illustration by Xavier Casalta

January 22, 2016

Christopher Jobson

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Artist Xavier Casalta (previously) wows us again with his miraculous patience and steady hand in this latest illustration titled Autumn, a flowing depiction of intertwined flowers, gourds, plants, and other vegetation. Casalta uses a technique called stippling, where a multitude of tiny ink dots are made it various patterns to create shadows, lines, and textures throughout the piece. The 23-year-old illustrator estimates Autumn contains roughly 7 million dots applied over a staggering period of 370 hours. You can see more close-up views of the piece here. (via Booooooom)

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Autumn. 56×56 cm ink drawing on arches sheet.

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Art Photography

An Amsterdam Museum Asks Visitors to Trade Their Selfie Sticks for Pencils and Paper

November 30, 2015

Kate Sierzputowski

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All images provided by the Rijksmuseum

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Rijksmuseum, an arts and history museum located in the heart of Amsterdam, is asking visitors to put down their cameras and pick up a pen next time they enter the museum’s walls. Rijksmuseum’s new campaign #startdrawing wants to slow down observers, encouraging attendees to draw sculptures and paintings that interest them rather than snapping a picture and moving on to the next work in quick succession.

By slowing down the process of observation, the visitor is able to get closer to the artist’s secrets, the museum explains, engaging with each work by actively doing instead of passively capturing. “In our busy lives we don’t always realize how beautiful something can be,” said Wim Pijbes, the general director of the Rijksmuseum. “We forget how to look really closely. Drawing helps because you see more when you draw.” The museum has begun to highlight drawings completed by participants on their Instagram as well as their blog associated with the campaign here.

Banning cameras (or softly dissuading attendees from using them) is also a way to bring the focus from the selfie an attendee may take with a work of art to the masterpiece before them. A perfectly timed exhibition titled “Selfies on Paper” is currently on display in the museum — 90 self-portraits from well known artists from the 17th to 20th century spread through each floor of the museum. The exhibition shows how artists captured themselves on paper while acting as a challenge to those who might have thought selfie sticks were the only tool appropriate for self preservation. “Selfies on Paper” will run though the winter. (via Hyperallergic)

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Art Illustration

A Gargantuan Octopus Rendered with Discarded Ballpoint Pens by Ray Cicin

November 17, 2015

Christopher Jobson

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Inspired in part by his graphic-designer friends disparaging comments about the lowly ballpoint pen, artist Ray Cicin took it upon himself to collect all their discarded pens and embarked on this drawing of a mammoth octopus. The piece is inspired by German naturalist Ernst Haeckel’s famous illustration of squid and octopi, and is part of Cicin’s ongoing Deep Blue series. You can follow more of his work on Instagram.

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Deep Blue, Octopus. Ballpoint pen on archival Bee Rag paper, 62 x 64 inches

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Art Illustration

Color Ballpoint Pen Drawings by Nicolas V. Sanchez

November 9, 2015

Christopher Jobson

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Artist Nicolas V. Sanchez fills entire sketchbooks with drawings of the world around him rendered in precise color ballpoint. Portraits of families page by page, sprawling scenes of rugged farms and livestock, and near photographic recollections of people and places from residencies in the Dominican Republic and China. Sanchez often explores the roots of his own identity, delving into a bi-cultural upbringing that spans from the American midwest to his family’s rural history in Mexico.

In addition to his exacting pen work, Sanchez is also a painter and works in a distinct style that’s quite different from his ballpoint pen sketches. The sketchbooks help him work through ideas to determine if they eventually meant for a larger canvas, or if they’re meant to exist only in the pages of a book.

Filmmaker Jesse Brass recently sat down to talk with Sanchez in his New York studio for this interview entitled Resolve.

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