Tag Archives: Earth

A New Large-Scale Mud Mural by Yusuke Asai Sprawls through Rice Gallery

A New Large Scale Mud Mural by Yusuke Asai Sprawls through Rice Gallery murals Earth

A New Large Scale Mud Mural by Yusuke Asai Sprawls through Rice Gallery murals Earth

A New Large Scale Mud Mural by Yusuke Asai Sprawls through Rice Gallery murals Earth

A New Large Scale Mud Mural by Yusuke Asai Sprawls through Rice Gallery murals Earth

A New Large Scale Mud Mural by Yusuke Asai Sprawls through Rice Gallery murals Earth

A New Large Scale Mud Mural by Yusuke Asai Sprawls through Rice Gallery murals Earth

A New Large Scale Mud Mural by Yusuke Asai Sprawls through Rice Gallery murals Earth

A New Large Scale Mud Mural by Yusuke Asai Sprawls through Rice Gallery murals Earth

Artist and painter Yusuke Asai (previously) has a new mud mural on display at Houston’s Rice Gallery. Working day and night with a team of assistants, the Japanese artist, who is known for his “earth paintings” made from locally sourced mud and dirt, spent just under 2 weeks covering the walls and floors of the gallery with soil collected in Houston. “There are so many kinds of soil in Houston and Texas,” says Asai. “Initially I had hoped for 10 different shades, and ended up with 27: the widest spectrum of colors representing a specific place that I have ever used.”

But why mud, you might wonder? Asai explains: “Dirt is by nature very different than materials sold in art stores.” Seeds grow in it and it is home to many insects and micro organisms. It is a ‘living’ medium.”

The resulting large-scale mural is titled yamatane (mountain seed, in Japanese) and features real and imaginary creatures and plants. The mural is on display through November 23, 2014. (syndicated from Spoon & Tamago)

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Clouds Cast Thousand-Mile Shadows into Space When Viewed Aboard the International Space Station

Clouds Cast Thousand Mile Shadows into Space When Viewed Aboard the International Space Station space shadows ISS Earth clouds

Clouds Cast Thousand Mile Shadows into Space When Viewed Aboard the International Space Station space shadows ISS Earth clouds

Clouds Cast Thousand Mile Shadows into Space When Viewed Aboard the International Space Station space shadows ISS Earth clouds

Clouds Cast Thousand Mile Shadows into Space When Viewed Aboard the International Space Station space shadows ISS Earth clouds

Clouds Cast Thousand Mile Shadows into Space When Viewed Aboard the International Space Station space shadows ISS Earth clouds

Clouds Cast Thousand Mile Shadows into Space When Viewed Aboard the International Space Station space shadows ISS Earth clouds

One of six astronauts currently on board the International Space Station, geophysicist Alexander Gerst spends much of his free time staring out the window as the world zooms by 205 miles below, camera in-hand. Since arriving at the ISS in June of this year Gerst has taken tons of photographs that document hurricanes, floods, dust storms, and oil fields.

One of his favorite things to shoot are the shadows cast by clouds, something that appears surprisingly dramatic from space. Dense cloud formations can create long shadows that stretch for thousands of miles across the Earth’s surface as they eventually disappear into a black horizon. You can see new photos from Gerst daily on Twitter. (via Stellar)

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NASA Releases First Ever Photograph of Saturn, Venus, Mars and Earth

NASA Releases First Ever Photograph of Saturn, Venus, Mars and Earth Venus space NASA moon Mars Earth

NASA Releases First Ever Photograph of Saturn, Venus, Mars and Earth Venus space NASA moon Mars Earth

You might remember earlier this summer when NASA released a striking image taken by the Cassini spacecraft of Earth as it appears from the dark side of Saturn. Yesterday the space agency wowed again with the first ever photograph of Saturn, Mars, Venus, and Earth all in the same shot. The image spans about 404,880 miles (651,591 kilometers) across and is made from 141 wide-angle photos taken by Cassini. You can learn more about the image over on JPL’s site where you can even download some wallpapers. This is a good excuse to watch an interpretation of Carl Sagan’s Pale Blue Dot monologue. Or this one. (via PetaPixel)

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Observing the Earth: Incredible Satellite Photos of Earth from the European Space Agency

Observing the Earth: Incredible Satellite Photos of Earth from the European Space Agency space Earth
Namib Desert / October 5, 2013

Observing the Earth: Incredible Satellite Photos of Earth from the European Space Agency space Earth
Ganges’ dazzling delta / July 31, 2009

Observing the Earth: Incredible Satellite Photos of Earth from the European Space Agency space Earth
Scandinavian snows / February 1, 2013

Observing the Earth: Incredible Satellite Photos of Earth from the European Space Agency space Earth
Mississippi River Delta / May 25, 2012

Observing the Earth: Incredible Satellite Photos of Earth from the European Space Agency space Earth
Clearwater Lakes, Canada / May 17, 2013

Observing the Earth: Incredible Satellite Photos of Earth from the European Space Agency space Earth
Peruvian landscape / July 4, 2013

Observing the Earth: Incredible Satellite Photos of Earth from the European Space Agency space Earth
Plentiful plankton / September 14, 2009

Observing the Earth: Incredible Satellite Photos of Earth from the European Space Agency space Earth
Swirling cloud art in the Atlantic Ocean / June 11, 2010

Observing the Earth: Incredible Satellite Photos of Earth from the European Space Agency space Earth
Agricultural crops in Aragon and Catalonia / November 26, 2010

Though I don’t have a homepage set, the first page in my daily rounds is always the Astronomy Picture of the Day (site currently down), a website launched by NASA and the Michigan Technological University way back in 1995, a nearly continous publication run of 18 years. Unfortunately due some minor, uhm, budget cuts in the U.S. government, all NASA websites are currently down due to a crushing 97% cut in workforce, including the humble Astronomy Picture of the Day.

Luckily there’s at least one space agency still publishing photos of space (and space from Earth), the European Space Agency. The ESA has an incredible Observing the Earth archive that’s updated every week and each satelitte image is usually accompanied by a brief essay to explain a bit about what you’re looking at. Collected here are some of my favorite images from the last few years taken with too many different satellites to mention, and you can search photos back through 2005 here. (via Devid Sketchbook)

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Planetary Structural Layer Cakes Designed by Cakecrumbs

Planetary Structural Layer Cakes Designed by Cakecrumbs planets Jupiter food Earth cooking cake

Planetary Structural Layer Cakes Designed by Cakecrumbs planets Jupiter food Earth cooking cake

Planetary Structural Layer Cakes Designed by Cakecrumbs planets Jupiter food Earth cooking cake

Planetary Structural Layer Cakes Designed by Cakecrumbs planets Jupiter food Earth cooking cake

Self-taught chef Rhiannon over at Cakecrumbs has been working on a fun series of planetary cakes that are designed to be scientifically accurate with different types of cake representing various layers within Earth and Jupiter. For her Jupiter Cake the center is the theoretical rock/ice core (mudcake), followed by a layer of liquid metallic hydrogen (almond butter), and finally the liquid molecular hydrogen (colored vanilla). She layered her Earth Cake similarly and finished it off with some absurdly detailed continent design made with marshmallow fondant.

Due to high demand she just posted an extremely detailed tutorial including a video that explains how to make spherical concentric layer cakes. Which is now a thing. That I will have at my birthdays now and forever. (via I F’ing Love Science)

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NASA Releases Photo of Earth Taken from the Dark Side of Saturn by the Cassini Spacecraft

NASA Releases Photo of Earth Taken from the Dark Side of Saturn by the Cassini Spacecraft space Saturn NASA Earth

NASA Releases Photo of Earth Taken from the Dark Side of Saturn by the Cassini Spacecraft space Saturn NASA Earth

Yesterday NASA published a new photograph taken on July 19, 2013, by a wide-angle camera on the Cassini spacecraft that shows a view of Earth from the dark side of Saturn. In the photo Earth is 898 million miles away and the moon appears as just a tiny protrusion off to the right (you might need to see it up close). According to NASA this is only the third time that Earth has ever been photographed from the outer solar system.

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Miniature Worlds Digitally Assembled from Hundreds of Photographs by Catherine Nelson

Miniature Worlds Digitally Assembled from Hundreds of Photographs by Catherine Nelson planets Earth digital collage

Miniature Worlds Digitally Assembled from Hundreds of Photographs by Catherine Nelson planets Earth digital collage

Miniature Worlds Digitally Assembled from Hundreds of Photographs by Catherine Nelson planets Earth digital collage

Miniature Worlds Digitally Assembled from Hundreds of Photographs by Catherine Nelson planets Earth digital collage

Miniature Worlds Digitally Assembled from Hundreds of Photographs by Catherine Nelson planets Earth digital collage

Miniature Worlds Digitally Assembled from Hundreds of Photographs by Catherine Nelson planets Earth digital collage

Miniature Worlds Digitally Assembled from Hundreds of Photographs by Catherine Nelson planets Earth digital collage

Miniature Worlds Digitally Assembled from Hundreds of Photographs by Catherine Nelson planets Earth digital collage

Sydney-based artist Catherine Nelson refers to herself as a painter with a camera, in that she doesn’t see the world as a photographer does but instead uses photos as a medium with which she creates these fantastic miniature worlds. Each work is comprised of hundreds of photographs which she digitally stitches together, drawing from an extensive background in visual special effects having worked on such films as Moulin Rouge, Harry Potter and 300. Of her work Nelson says:

When I embraced the medium of photography, I felt that taking a picture that represented only what was within the frame of the lens wasn’t expressing my personal and inner experience of the world around me. With the eye and training of a painter and with years of experience behind me in film visual effects, I began to take my photos to another level. The ‘Future Memories’ series comprises of 20 floating worlds, meticulously composed with thousands of assembled details. Visual poetry, nature photography and digital techniques blend together to give shape to these transcendental landscapes. The result is a contemporary pictorial mythology that subtly reminds the viewer of a profound truth: that it is in the flourishing variety of the local that the fate of the world resides.

Although the pieces are quite gorgeous to look at right here on Colossal, it’s hard to convey the resolution and scale of each piece which measures about 40×40″ (100x100cm), a level of detail that requires Nelson to spend nearly a month on each piece. It was my assumption based on the perspective and detail that some of these works must be somehow partially rendered in 3D, however she assured me via email that this is not the case. Though she uses digital editing to assemble them, they are almost purely based in photography. Incredible.

Nelson had several pieces on display earlier this month at fotofever in Brussels and will have work later this year at Gallery NOW in Seoul and at CONTEXT in Miami. You can see much more of her work at Galerie Paris-Beijing.

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