Tag Archives: embroidery

New Densely Embroidered Animals by Chloe Giordano

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Embroidery artist Chloe Giordano (previously) continues to evolve her extraordinary talents with needle and thread in these latest stitched illustrations of small animals. Embracing her background as a traditional illustrator, Giordano is able to layer countless different thread colors as one might do with pencils. The Oxford-based artist is very open about her techniques and often fields questions on her Tumblr. Her latest piece, Sleeping Hare, is currently available through Light Grey Art Lab.

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Stephanie K. Clark’s Thread Paintings Capture Homes in Their Distinctly Native Surroundings

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Stephanie K Clark builds homes from swatches of cloth and spools of thread, embroidering tiny dwellings which appear to absorb the sun and moonlight from her small-scale scenes. The structures and their surrounding landscaping appear in vibrant colors while supporting and environment-specific trees, cacti, flamingos, and dogs lay nearby in faint black outlines.

The Salt Lake City-based Clark envisions the works as paintings with thread, and spends most of her time sewing and finding alternative ways to explore the creative process. “When I embroider on canvas it feels like oils; it flows, it blends, and it’s rich,” says the artist on her website. “When I embroider on loose shear or silk, it’s like a watercolor; its delicate, the thread goes where it wants to go, and it moves with the fabric.” Clark uses the embroidery to create a domestic feel that she believes accurately the tells the story of both a life in the home and family.

Clark does not sell her embroideries online, but takes commissions via email. More work of Clark’s can be found on her blog and Instagram. (via The Jealous Curator)

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Embroidered Paintings and Historical Photos by Mana Morimoto

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Fiber artist Mana Morimoto spares no medium with her vibrantly stitched embroidery that spans sculptures, installations, weavings, and 2D materials like concert tickets and advertisements. Among my favorite of her works are these embroidered monochromatic photographs and paintings. An etching of Isaac Newton is overlaid with rainbows of light and Morimoto even goes meta by embroidering on images depicting other fiber artists, going so far as mimicking the progress of a weaving on an old photograph. You can explore more of her work in Tumblr, Cargo Collective, and some of her works are available as prints on Society6.

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New Cross-Stitched Microbes and Germs by Alicia Watkins

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It’s been a year since we last stumbled onto these embroidered germs and microbes by Alicia Watkins (previously). Her comprehensive menagerie of microbial maladies has grown extensively. You can see much more in her shop.

The Felted Specimens of Hine Mizushima

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The list of talents attached to Vancouver-based artist Hine Mizushima's name includes stop-motion puppet animator, illustrator, needle felter, toy designer, and sculptor. Her colorful hand-stitched squids, octopi, mushrooms, and medical specimens that might otherwise be described as creepy or crawly are instead infused with ample doses of fluffy and fuzzy. Mizushima exhibited most recently at FOE Gallery and many of her original felt pieces are available over on Etsy.

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Thread Paintings: Densely Embroidered Portraits by Cayce Zavaglia

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When scouring through the minute details of artist Cayce Zavaglia’s embroidered portraits (previously), it’s difficult imagine each work is scarcely larger than 8″ x 10″. Her process, which she refers to as both “thread painting” and “renegade embroidery,” begins with a photoshoot of each subject, namely friends, family, and fellow artists. Roughly 100-150 photos are winnowed down to a single selection which she then begins to embroider with one-ply embroidery thread on Belgian linen. She shares via her artist statement:

Over the years, I have developed a sewing technique that allows me to blend colors and establish tonalities that resemble the techniques used in classical oil painting. The direction in which the threads are sewn mimic the way brush marks are layered within a painting which, in turn, allows for the allusion of depth, volume, and form. My stitching methodology borders on the obsessive, but ultimately allows me to visually evoke painterly renditions of flesh, hair, and cloth.

Zavaglia is also interested with the backs of her portraits, a tangled mesh of thread and knots resembling a more abstract version of the exacting portrait on the reverse. In a return to her roots as a painter, she creates gouache and large format acrylic paintings of the backsides, effectively creating a painting of an emboirdery of a photograph. Included here are several works from the last two years including works that will be on view at Art Miami this December through Lyons Wier Gallery. (via Booooooom)

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The Ingenuity and Beauty of Creative Parchment Repair in Medieval Books

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Bamberg, Staatsbibliothek, Msc.Nat.1 (9th century)

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Books repaired with silk thread. Uppsala, University Library, Shelfmark unknown (14th century)

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Bamberg, Staatsbibliothek, Msc.Patr.41, fol. 69r.

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Bamberg, Staatsbibliothek, Msc.Patr.41, fol. 69r. Detail.

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Engelberg, Stiftsbibliothek, MS 16, 12th century

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Freiburg, Kantons- und Universitätsbibliothek, MS L 34, 14th century

Another day, another collection of fascinating discoveries from medieval book historian Erik Kwakkel who previously introduced the internet to his observations on the history of doodles, color theory, and rare forms of bookbinding. Kwakkel has also been investigating how bookmakers found creative solutions around damaged parchment—thin membranes of cow and sheepskin used for printing books between the fifth and thirteenth centuries before the rise of paper. Parchment was extremely delicate and costly to manufacture well, so imperfections from animal hair follicles to small tears and texture anomalies were left for the poor scribes to contend with.

After witnessing their doodling artistry, it should come as no surprise that medieval scribes had a host of ideas to work around bad parchment, from webs of silk embroidery to cheeky illustrations, the blemishes were incorporated right into the physical texts. Although a different medium, the process is uncannily similar to the ancient Japanese process of repairing broken ceramics, Kintsugi, where fractures in pots or bowls are mended with precious metal, acknowledging the history of the imperfect object instead of discarding it.

You can learn much more about Kwakkel’s parchment discoveries in his article “The Skinny on Bad Parchment,” and in these two posts on Tumblr.

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