Tag Archives: embroidery

Felted Veggies Dangle from Embroidered Leaves

Felted Veggies Dangle from Embroidered Leaves vegetables textiles food embroidery

Felted Veggies Dangle from Embroidered Leaves vegetables textiles food embroidery

Felted Veggies Dangle from Embroidered Leaves vegetables textiles food embroidery

I promise Colossal won’t turn into a full-time embroidery blog, but Munich-based Veselka Bulkan from Green Accordion created these fun felted veggies that dangle hang from embroidered leaves. Currently available in two different designs. (via Whimsebox)

Cross-Stitched Germs and Microbes

Cross Stitched Germs and Microbes microbes germs embroidery

Cross Stitched Germs and Microbes microbes germs embroidery

Cross Stitched Germs and Microbes microbes germs embroidery

Cross Stitched Germs and Microbes microbes germs embroidery

Cross Stitched Germs and Microbes microbes germs embroidery

I’m loving these cross-stitched germs, microbes and other super tiny things by Alicia Watkins over at Watty’s Wall Stuff. The pieces are available a la carte, in sets, or as DIY patterns. (via This Isn’t Happiness)

Ornate Embroidery Patterns Stitched into Metallic Objects

Ornate Embroidery Patterns Stitched into Metallic Objects embroidery
Greed, 2012. Metal spoon, cotton, Cross stitch, drilling. Photo courtesy Modestas Ežerskis.

Ornate Embroidery Patterns Stitched into Metallic Objects embroidery

Ornate Embroidery Patterns Stitched into Metallic Objects embroidery

Ornate Embroidery Patterns Stitched into Metallic Objects embroidery
Life is Beautiful, 2005. Metal lid, cotton. Cross-stitch, drilling. Photo courtesy Modestas Ežerskis.

Ornate Embroidery Patterns Stitched into Metallic Objects embroidery
Life is Beautiful, 2005. Metal lid, cotton. Cross-stitch, drilling. Photo courtesy Modestas Ežerskis.

Ornate Embroidery Patterns Stitched into Metallic Objects embroidery
Bucket of Light, 2010. Sunflower, 2010. Metal parts, cotton, wire, bulb. Cross-stitch, drilling, welding. Photo courtesy Modestas Ežerskis.

Ornate Embroidery Patterns Stitched into Metallic Objects embroidery
Every Stick Has Two Ends, 2012. Shovel parts, wood, cotton. Cross-stitch, drilling. Photo courtesy Modestas Ežerskis.

Ornate Embroidery Patterns Stitched into Metallic Objects embroidery
Daily Bread to Give to as Today, 2009. Metal bowl, cotton. Cross-stitch, drilling. Photo courtesy Modestas Ežerskis.

Ornate Embroidery Patterns Stitched into Metallic Objects embroidery
After Party, 2013. Tin can, cotton. Cross-stitch, drilling. Photo courtesy Modestas Ežerskis.

Ornate Embroidery Patterns Stitched into Metallic Objects embroidery
Between City and Country, 2009. Metal bucket, watering can, milk can. Cross-stitch, drilling. Photo courtesy Modestas Ežerskis.

Ornate Embroidery Patterns Stitched into Metallic Objects embroidery
Rococo, 2007. Metal plate, cotton. Cross-stitch, drilling. Photo courtesy Modestas Ežerskis.

Ornate Embroidery Patterns Stitched into Metallic Objects embroidery

In an attempt to subvert traditional embroidery culture, Lithuatian artist Severija Inčirauskaitė-Kriaunevičienė applies standard floral and decorative patterns found in embroidery magazines to metallic objects like plates, spoons, lamps and even car doors. The juxtaposition of functional objects emblazoned with traditional textile work is certain unexpected and little amusing, an aspect Severija further illustrates with some of her more humorous pieces depicting cigarette butts embroidered at the base of a tin can, or the skewed reflection of a person’s mouth on the edge of a spoon. From an essay on her work by Dr. Jurgita Ludavičienė:

Employing irony, Severija conceptually neutralizes the harmfulness of kitsch’s sweetness and sentimentality. Irony emerges in the process of drawing inspiration from the postwar Lithuanian village, with which artists have lost connection today, or from the destitute Soviet domestic environment, which women were trying to embellish with handicrafts, no matter what kind of absurd forms it would take. The intimacy of indoors freed from all tensions is the essence of coziness, that is crystallized in Severija’s works as cross stitch embroidery on various household utensils not intended for it.

You can see much more of her embroidery work right here.

A Huge Collection of Embroidered Temari Spheres by an 88-Year-Old Grandmother

A Huge Collection of Embroidered Temari Spheres by an 88 Year Old Grandmother toys textiles embroidery balls

A Huge Collection of Embroidered Temari Spheres by an 88 Year Old Grandmother toys textiles embroidery balls

A Huge Collection of Embroidered Temari Spheres by an 88 Year Old Grandmother toys textiles embroidery balls

A Huge Collection of Embroidered Temari Spheres by an 88 Year Old Grandmother toys textiles embroidery balls

A Huge Collection of Embroidered Temari Spheres by an 88 Year Old Grandmother toys textiles embroidery balls

A Huge Collection of Embroidered Temari Spheres by an 88 Year Old Grandmother toys textiles embroidery balls

A Huge Collection of Embroidered Temari Spheres by an 88 Year Old Grandmother toys textiles embroidery balls

A Huge Collection of Embroidered Temari Spheres by an 88 Year Old Grandmother toys textiles embroidery balls

A Huge Collection of Embroidered Temari Spheres by an 88 Year Old Grandmother toys textiles embroidery balls

Temari balls are a form of folk art that originated in China and were introduced to Japan in the 7th century. The carefully hand-embroidered balls often made from the thread of old kimonos were created by parents or grandparents and given to children on New Year’s day as special gift. According to Wikipedia the balls would sometimes contain secret handwritten wish for the child, or else contained some kind of noise-making object like a bell.

Flickr user NanaAkua photographed this amazing collection of geometric spheres created by her 88-year-old grandmother who began to master the art in her 60s. She has since created hundreds of them, nearly 500 of which you can see right here. (via DDN Japan)

Artist Hiroko Kubota Embroiders Popular Internet Cats on Shirts at the Request of Her Son

Artist Hiroko Kubota Embroiders Popular Internet Cats on Shirts at the Request of Her Son shirts fashion embroidery cats

Artist Hiroko Kubota Embroiders Popular Internet Cats on Shirts at the Request of Her Son shirts fashion embroidery cats

Artist Hiroko Kubota Embroiders Popular Internet Cats on Shirts at the Request of Her Son shirts fashion embroidery cats

Artist Hiroko Kubota Embroiders Popular Internet Cats on Shirts at the Request of Her Son shirts fashion embroidery cats

Artist Hiroko Kubota Embroiders Popular Internet Cats on Shirts at the Request of Her Son shirts fashion embroidery cats

Artist Hiroko Kubota Embroiders Popular Internet Cats on Shirts at the Request of Her Son shirts fashion embroidery cats

Japanese embroidery artist Hiroko Kubota was in the process of making custom sized clothes for her smaller-framed son when he made a small request: could some of the shirts have cats on them? Kubota explains her son was somewhat obsessed with cats and had collected a small library of adorable images found around the web.

After making a few cat shirts the artist posted photos of the pieces online and unsurprisingly they quickly went viral, spurring Kubota to open an Etsy shop under the brand Go!Go!5 where she started selling the shirts at an impressive price tag of around $250-$300 apiece. But price was no object for internet cat fanatics and the shirts have been snapped up almost as quickly as Kubota embroiders them.

You can see many more shirts here. All photos courtesy the artist. (via Spoon & Tamago)

Embroidered 3D Insects and Snails by Claire Moynihan

Embroidered 3D Insects and Snails by Claire Moynihan textiles sculpture insects embroidery

Embroidered 3D Insects and Snails by Claire Moynihan textiles sculpture insects embroidery

Embroidered 3D Insects and Snails by Claire Moynihan textiles sculpture insects embroidery

Embroidered 3D Insects and Snails by Claire Moynihan textiles sculpture insects embroidery

Embroidered 3D Insects and Snails by Claire Moynihan textiles sculpture insects embroidery

Embroidered 3D Insects and Snails by Claire Moynihan textiles sculpture insects embroidery

Artist Claire Moynihan lives and works in rural Hertfordshire, England where she creates tiny sculptural insects and snails on felt balls using a variety of freeform embroidery techniques. After completing a collection of work Moynihan then organizes the pieces inside traditional entomological boxes which from a distance could almost pass for the real thing. See much more of her work in her gallery. (via lustik)

Favorite Place: An Embroidered Stop-Motion Music Video for Black Books by Christophe Thockler

Favorite Place: An Embroidered Stop Motion Music Video for Black Books by Christophe Thockler textiles stop motion sewing embroidery animation

Favorite Place: An Embroidered Stop Motion Music Video for Black Books by Christophe Thockler textiles stop motion sewing embroidery animation

Favorite Place: An Embroidered Stop Motion Music Video for Black Books by Christophe Thockler textiles stop motion sewing embroidery animation

Is this the first music video made exclusively with embroidery and sewing implements? I’m gambling yes. Directed, filmed, and produced by Christophe Thockler the clip uses 10,000 photographs of needles, thread, cloth and embroidery, mixed with clever lighting techniques to produce a fun video for Favorite Place, the latest track by US pop rock band Black Books.

New Photorealistic Portraits Hand-Embroidered by Cayce Zavaglia

New Photorealistic Portraits Hand Embroidered by Cayce Zavaglia portraits embroidery

New Photorealistic Portraits Hand Embroidered by Cayce Zavaglia portraits embroidery

New Photorealistic Portraits Hand Embroidered by Cayce Zavaglia portraits embroidery

New Photorealistic Portraits Hand Embroidered by Cayce Zavaglia portraits embroidery

New Photorealistic Portraits Hand Embroidered by Cayce Zavaglia portraits embroidery

New Photorealistic Portraits Hand Embroidered by Cayce Zavaglia portraits embroidery

New Photorealistic Portraits Hand Embroidered by Cayce Zavaglia portraits embroidery

New Photorealistic Portraits Hand Embroidered by Cayce Zavaglia portraits embroidery

New Photorealistic Portraits Hand Embroidered by Cayce Zavaglia portraits embroidery

Stitch by stitch and color by color St. Louis based figurative artist Cayce Zavaglia (previously) utilizes her background as a painter to embroider excruciatingly detailed portraits that look almost like photographs. The process, which she refers to as a “renegade approach to embroidery”, begins with a photo-shoot consisting of 100-150 portraits from which she selects the best image and then moves to the canvas where she works with one ply embroidery thread on Belgian linen to create each piece which is often not larger than 8″ x 10″. Her four most recent works, some of which are included above, will be shown at Art Miami through Lyons Wier Gallery in December. I highly encourage you to watch the video above by Garrett Zavaglia to see quite a bit more detail about how she works.

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