family

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Art Photography

Puzzling Portraits of Identical Twins by Photographer Alma Haser

November 29, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

In her latest series, German photographer Alma Haser combines the portraits of several pairs of twins by literally puzzling their images together. Haser first photographs each twin separately, then prints their corresponding photograph onto a 500 or 1000-piece puzzle. Finally, Haser painstakingly switches every other piece to create two works that are an equal combination of each sibling.

In earlier works in the series Haser only switched the twins’ faces, rather than melding their entire portraits. In the side-by-side images of the the twin brothers below it is difficult to tell if anything is swapped, unless you narrow your focus to the subjects’ eyes.

Haser recently contributed a few portraits from this series to the group exhibition The Body Issue: Human Stories at NOW Gallery in London. You can see more of her portraiture involving twins on her website and Instagram, and shop select prints on her online store. (via Hi-Fructose)

 

 

 



Amazing Art Design

An Upcoming Documentary About Tall Bikes and a Family that Prizes Creative Expression Above All Else

April 21, 2016

Christopher Jobson

Part film trailer, part home video, part testament to the power of unbridled creativity, this extended teaser gives us a glimpse into the unusual life of the Zenga Bros and their obsession with absurdly tall bicycles. Born and raised in Vancouver, the 6 brothers come from an eclectic family of 9 children who were taught from a young age to explore their own creativity, no matter where it lead them. This belief was embraced so thoroughly it became a lifestyle complete with a set of three intersecting tenets called the Three Beans: Create Everywhere, Redeem Everything, and Be a Fool.

The Zengas have engaged in community art projects since 1999, but the most notable has been the design and fabrication of tall bikes. They first encountered photos of similar bike designs in the late 90s in a zine and soon the boys were singularly obsessed with building their own unwieldy cycles. The bikes have connected them to makers from around the world, taken them on a trip across Africa, and will culminate in an upcoming tall bike tour and film currently in production by one of the brothers, Benny Zenga. The Zengas also produced a film last year with Booooooom titled Skate Heads that’s definitely worth a watch.

The film’s trailer is currently premiering as part of the 2016 Tribeca Film Festival in New York. You can learn more on their website or by following them on Instagram.

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Photo by Dave Zenga


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Photo by Dave Zenga


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Photo by Dave Zenga

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Photography

A Photographer Lovingly Captures the Unlikely Bond between His Family and an Orphaned Bird

March 31, 2015

Christopher Jobson

penguin the magpie

The stories of a unique bond between a child and their pet are as timeless as they come, but rarely does the pet have wings. Such is the case with photographer Cameron Bloom whose son Noah happened upon a baby magpie in 2013 when the family was out walking near their home in Newport, Australia. After consulting with a veterinarian, the family learned to raise the orphaned bird, who they affectionately named Penguin.

A year later, the curious bird has deeply integrated with the family. Despite being free to come and go outdoors, she always returns to the Bloom household where Cameron, his wife Sam, and their sons Rueben, Noah, and Oli eagerly await her return. On rare occasions, Penguin even shows off her adopted family to other magpies who have followed her inside the house.

For the past year, Bloom has dutifully snapped photos which he publishes on a wildly popular Instagram account. Seriously people, it’s amazing; follow it now, ask questions later. The feels. Penguin pretty much gets the run of the house and is free to snuggle with the family in bed, get tangled in their hair, or help with homework.

Just yesterday, New York Times bestselling author Bradley Trevor Greive announced that he’ll be writing a book about Penguin and the Blooms, accompanied by Cameron’s photography. You can see more on his website. All photos shared here courtesy the photographer. (via Beautiful Decay, ABC)

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Animation

Woman Creates Touching Animated Portrait of Her Grandmother Using Her Old Possessions

May 1, 2014

Christopher Jobson

After the death of her grandmother in 2010, animator and illustrator Gemma Green-Hope was called to help sort through some of her remaining possessions. What she discovered evoked not only memories, but also resulted in a new understanding of who her grandmother was by cataloging the objects she left behind. Green-Hope transformed the old books, clothes, jewelry and photos into this touching stop-motion portrait. Also, spoiler: her grandmother shot a spider. (via Vimeo Staff Picks)

 

 



Art

Timelapse of the Imperceptible Effects of Aging Created from Family Portraits by Anthony Cerniello

September 9, 2013

Christopher Jobson

Editor’s note: Watch the whole thing. With sound. Don’t skip around. Just let it play, or else you’re missing out.

Aging is fascinating thing to document in film and photography, from Noah Kalina’s 12+ year portrait a day project to Diego Goldberg’s family portrait series that began in 1976, it’s interesting to see how many different approaches there are. This new clip titled Danielle from filmmaker Anthony Cerniello tries something I’ve never seen before and packs an amazing punch.

Last Thanksgiving, Cerniello traveled to his friend Danielle’s family reunion and with still photographer Keith Sirchio shot portraits of her youngest cousins through to her oldest relatives with a Hasselblad medium format camera. Then began the process of scanning each photo with a drum scanner at the U.N. in New York, at which point he carefully edited the photos to select the family members that had the most similar bone structure. Next he brought on animators Nathan Meier and Edmund Earle who worked in After Effects and 3D Studio Max to morph and animate the still photos to make them lifelike as possible. Finally, Nuke (a kind of 3D visual effects software) artist George Cuddy was brought on to smooth out some small details like the eyes and hair.

The final result is pretty remarkable, if a little bizarre. Not quite out of the uncanny valley, and yet pause the movie at any moment and it feels like you’re looking at a plain portrait. While it plays the transitions are just slow enough that you’re only vaguely aware anything is happening. It’s amazing as it is weird. He tells me via email:

I wanted to make a person, I felt like I could tell a story with that, but it ended up feeling slightly robotic, like an android. I’m OK with that. Things never come out the exact way you plan them, but that’s the fun. The score I imagined would tell this woman’s life, with events speeding by as she aged, but in the end I thought it would be more interesting to go with an abstract piece of sound, and my friend Mark Reveley really came through because I love how it sounds.

Cerniello normally edits commercials and music videos for the likes of 30 Seconds to Mars and Kings of Leon, you can see much more of his work over on his website.

 

 



History Photography

My Parents Were Awesome Blog Becomes a Book

November 21, 2010

Christopher Jobson

Some recent submissions to My Parents Were Awesome, a great blog where people submit photos of their parents being awesome. Soon to be a book, My Parents Were Awesome: Before Fanny Packs and Minivans, They Were People Too.

 

 

A Colossal

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