Tag Archives: fashion

Airy Dresses Carved From Marble by Alasdair Thomson

Airy Dresses Carved From Marble by Alasdair Thomson sculpture marble fashion clothing

Airy Dresses Carved From Marble by Alasdair Thomson sculpture marble fashion clothing

Airy Dresses Carved From Marble by Alasdair Thomson sculpture marble fashion clothing

Airy Dresses Carved From Marble by Alasdair Thomson sculpture marble fashion clothing

Airy Dresses Carved From Marble by Alasdair Thomson sculpture marble fashion clothing Airy Dresses Carved From Marble by Alasdair Thomson sculpture marble fashion clothing

These lightweight, airy dresses look like they’re about to be adorned to a fancy gala or dinner party. But as irony would have it, they will never be worn. In fact, the dresses are actually made from Carrera Marble, the same material as the world’s most famous naked statue – Michelangelo’s David. Starting out as a solid mass of marble that can weigh several tons, they are chiseled and sculpted down by Alasdair Thomson, a sculptor living and working in Edinburgh, Scotland.

His latest work, “The Identity Collection,” (named as if it’s a fashion line) explores “the way fabric hangs and folds, and is attempting to capture that lightness and gracefulness in stone.” Effectively ceding control over his subjects, Alasdair asked his friends and family to donate garments, which he then impeccably recreated out of marble. You can see more of Alasdair’s work on his website or his Instagram account.

Artist Hiroko Kubota Embroiders Popular Internet Cats on Shirts at the Request of Her Son

Artist Hiroko Kubota Embroiders Popular Internet Cats on Shirts at the Request of Her Son shirts fashion embroidery cats

Artist Hiroko Kubota Embroiders Popular Internet Cats on Shirts at the Request of Her Son shirts fashion embroidery cats

Artist Hiroko Kubota Embroiders Popular Internet Cats on Shirts at the Request of Her Son shirts fashion embroidery cats

Artist Hiroko Kubota Embroiders Popular Internet Cats on Shirts at the Request of Her Son shirts fashion embroidery cats

Artist Hiroko Kubota Embroiders Popular Internet Cats on Shirts at the Request of Her Son shirts fashion embroidery cats

Artist Hiroko Kubota Embroiders Popular Internet Cats on Shirts at the Request of Her Son shirts fashion embroidery cats

Japanese embroidery artist Hiroko Kubota was in the process of making custom sized clothes for her smaller-framed son when he made a small request: could some of the shirts have cats on them? Kubota explains her son was somewhat obsessed with cats and had collected a small library of adorable images found around the web.

After making a few cat shirts the artist posted photos of the pieces online and unsurprisingly they quickly went viral, spurring Kubota to open an Etsy shop under the brand Go!Go!5 where she started selling the shirts at an impressive price tag of around $250-$300 apiece. But price was no object for internet cat fanatics and the shirts have been snapped up almost as quickly as Kubota embroiders them.

You can see many more shirts here. All photos courtesy the artist. (via Spoon & Tamago)

Fashion in Leaves by Tang Chiew Ling

Fashion in Leaves by Tang Chiew Ling plants leaves fashion

Fashion in Leaves by Tang Chiew Ling plants leaves fashion

Fashion in Leaves by Tang Chiew Ling plants leaves fashion

Fashion in Leaves by Tang Chiew Ling plants leaves fashion

Fashion in Leaves by Tang Chiew Ling plants leaves fashion

Fashion in Leaves by Tang Chiew Ling plants leaves fashion

Fashion in Leaves by Tang Chiew Ling plants leaves fashion

Fashion in Leaves is ongoing personal project by Malaysian illustrator and artist Tang Chiew Ling that explores various forms of leaves and flowers as if they were fashion sketches. Ling previously merged flora with illustration in another series of images called Object Art, and if you liked this, also checkout Drawing with Leaves. (via The Jackass Gardener)

Uncanny Aerial and Fashion Photography Mashups by Joseph Ford

Uncanny Aerial and Fashion Photography Mashups by Joseph Ford landscapes fashion advertising
© Joseph Ford 2011-13. All rights reserved.

Uncanny Aerial and Fashion Photography Mashups by Joseph Ford landscapes fashion advertising
© Joseph Ford 2011-13. All rights reserved.

Uncanny Aerial and Fashion Photography Mashups by Joseph Ford landscapes fashion advertising
© Joseph Ford 2011-13. All rights reserved.

Uncanny Aerial and Fashion Photography Mashups by Joseph Ford landscapes fashion advertising
© Joseph Ford 2011-13. All rights reserved.

Uncanny Aerial and Fashion Photography Mashups by Joseph Ford landscapes fashion advertising
© Joseph Ford 2011-13. All rights reserved.

Uncanny Aerial and Fashion Photography Mashups by Joseph Ford landscapes fashion advertising
© Joseph Ford 2011-13. All rights reserved.

Uncanny Aerial and Fashion Photography Mashups by Joseph Ford landscapes fashion advertising
© Joseph Ford 2011-13. All rights reserved.

Uncanny Aerial and Fashion Photography Mashups by Joseph Ford landscapes fashion advertising
© Joseph Ford 2011-13. All rights reserved.

Uncanny Aerial and Fashion Photography Mashups by Joseph Ford landscapes fashion advertising
© Joseph Ford 2011-13. All rights reserved.

It’s a project that on paper seems like it wouldn’t work: how to create a juxtaposition between breathtaking aerial landscape photography and the fine details of fashion. Leave it to Joseph Ford to make it happen. The Brighton-based photographer first showed a number of aerial images shot while working on advertising jobs in Sicily, Mauritius and Morocco to art director Stephanie Buisseret and stylist Mario Faundez at Paris streetwear magazine, WAD. The trio then came up with appropriate combinations of color, fabric and lighting to create near seamless transitions from photo to photo. Plaid stripes morph into city streets and undulating sand dunes seem to flow from the folds of a wrinkled sweater. The series of composite images was selected for the Association of Photographers Awards in the UK and received an Honorable Mention in the International Photography Awards.

Ford later teamed up stylist Almut Vogel from Süddeutsche Zeitung Magazin to create another series of photos in the same vein, also included above. Despite relying on expert pilots to achieve the complex aerial shots, it was the fine details of the studio photoshoots that proved most time-consuming, with nearly 12 hours spent on a single image to achieve such perfect overlap. See more over on Josephy Ford’s website. (via This isn’t Happiness)

Second Skins: Fashionably Dressed Animals Photographed by Miguel Vallinas

Second Skins: Fashionably Dressed Animals Photographed by Miguel Vallinas portraits fashion clothing birds anthropomorphic animals

Second Skins: Fashionably Dressed Animals Photographed by Miguel Vallinas portraits fashion clothing birds anthropomorphic animals

Second Skins: Fashionably Dressed Animals Photographed by Miguel Vallinas portraits fashion clothing birds anthropomorphic animals

Second Skins: Fashionably Dressed Animals Photographed by Miguel Vallinas portraits fashion clothing birds anthropomorphic animals

Second Skins: Fashionably Dressed Animals Photographed by Miguel Vallinas portraits fashion clothing birds anthropomorphic animals

Second Skins: Fashionably Dressed Animals Photographed by Miguel Vallinas portraits fashion clothing birds anthropomorphic animals

Second Skins: Fashionably Dressed Animals Photographed by Miguel Vallinas portraits fashion clothing birds anthropomorphic animals

Second Skins: Fashionably Dressed Animals Photographed by Miguel Vallinas portraits fashion clothing birds anthropomorphic animals

Second Skins: Fashionably Dressed Animals Photographed by Miguel Vallinas portraits fashion clothing birds anthropomorphic animals

Second Skins: Fashionably Dressed Animals Photographed by Miguel Vallinas portraits fashion clothing birds anthropomorphic animals

When first encountering this body of photographs Madrid-based advertising and industrial photographer Miguel Vallinas it’s easy to view it as a familiar “animals dressed as people” project. But as you look closer you realize it’s quite a bit more than that. Aside from the solid retouching, lighting and overall execution, Vallinas took this anthropomorphic project a bit further and imagined what the fully-realized wardrobe of each animal might look like if it were wearing human clothes.

Titled Segundas Pieles (Second Skins), the ongoing series includes some 50+ animals whose personalities seem to be perfectly amplified by their pitch-perfect attire, making the portaits just a bit more human than animal. I’m pretty sure the hipster bird in the cardigan works at a coffee shop by my house. The work is a sister project to another series called simply Pieles where the photographer portrays himself in a wide range of professions. (via lustik)

Paintings by Amanda Clyne

Paintings by Amanda Clyne portraits painting magazines fashion collage

Paintings by Amanda Clyne portraits painting magazines fashion collage

Paintings by Amanda Clyne portraits painting magazines fashion collage

Paintings by Amanda Clyne portraits painting magazines fashion collage

Paintings by Amanda Clyne portraits painting magazines fashion collage

I’m really enjoying these vertically sliced portraits by Amanda Clyne who uses images from fashion magazines as a starting point for a rather involved process, that I’ll let her explain in her own words.

I begin my process by culling images from fashion magazines. Cropping the image into a portrait, I re-print the image on to a surface to which the printing ink does not adhere, so the image remains wet. I photograph the print as the fluid image morphs and dissolves over time. I then compose a new image from fragments of these photographs—each image each is comprised of slices of the image at various stages of dissolution. Once I have resolved the final composition, I project the basic outlines of the image onto a canvas, and use a print-out of my composition as a painting reference. Each fragment is taped off and painted separately. Because of the narrow width of the fragments (some are less than 1/4 inch wide), I usually paint every third fragment, then while I wait for those fragments to dry, I paint alternating fragments on a different painting. Some paintings require three or four rounds of painting, so I work on several paintings at once.

The results are really quite striking. Clyne will have three new works on display at Art Toronto at the end of October. Thanks Amanda for sharing your work with Colossal!

Rebecca Chew

Rebecca Chew textiles fashion embroidery

An embroidered photo for Esquire by Rebecca Chew, Art Director for Esquire Malaysia. (thnx, rebecca!)

The Balloon Hat Experience

The Balloon Hat Experience social people hats fashion balloons

The Balloon Hat Experience social people hats fashion balloons

The Balloon Hat Experience social people hats fashion balloons

The Balloon Hat Experience social people hats fashion balloons

Since 2008 balloon artist Addi Somekh and photographer Charlie Eckert have traveled to 34 countries and shot over 10,000 photographs of people wearing balloon hats. After focusing more on balloon twisting than homework in college Somekh began working professionally as a balloon artist, charging wealthy executives up to $150 an hour to make elaborate balloon hats. He also donated the same skill to shelters for battered women and their children where he realized something: both groups, the rich and the poor, were laughing and enjoying his work in the same way. He had struck upon a democratic, neutralizing and powerful force of entertainment and enrichment, and he hatched a plan with his friend Charles to bring that gift to thousands of people across the world. Learn more on their website (flash). Thanks Stephanie for your submission to the Colossal curatorial contest!

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