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Art

Sky-High Paper Wigs Topped With Modern Luxuries by Asya Kozina

October 16, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

Paper artist Asya Kozina was inspired by the decadent wigs found in Baroque and Rococo still lifes, tall masses of hair adorned with objects that represent the ideals of luxury and beauty in the 17th and 18th centuries. Her series Skyscraper on the Head imagines how these outdated accessories might look if produced today, replacing the exotic fruits and birds of early centuries with airplanes, skyscrapers, and ferris wheels.

The project is a continuation of a series of Baroque paper wigs the artist began making in 2015. You can see more of Kozina’s life-size and miniature paper costumes on her Instagram and Behance. (via Design Boom)

 

 



Design

Anatomical Fish Zip Bags by Japanese Designer Keiko Otsuhata

September 29, 2017

Laura Staugaitis

Japanese designer Keiko Otsuhata has brought a new dimension to the popularity of fish as food by turning the sea creature into a functional-out-of-water zip bag. In Japan, fried fish (especially mackerel) is often seen on bar menus, and is prepared by splitting the fish through its stomach and frying it flat. The sight of fried fish is common visual vocabulary in Japan, but Otsuhata was curious about what the fish looked like in its pre-fried state, so she bought one from the grocery store, took photographs, and made it into a zip bag.

Tokyo-based Otsuhata is also a writer for the Japanese website Daily Portal Z, where she often shares her creative process as she explores pop culture and humor. You can see how she made the original fish bag, as well as a pair of pigeon shoes.

Three varieties of Otsuhata’s fish bags—kinme, saury, and sea bream—are available in The Colossal Shop.

 

 

 

 

 



Colossal

New in the Colossal Shop: Furoshiki Scarves Hand-Made in Japan by the LINK Collective

July 6, 2017

Christopher Jobson

Kyoko Bowskill, the founder of Tokyo-based LINK, is working to revive the centuries-old Japanese tradition of carrying objects of all sorts in beautiful reusable squares of fabric: furoshiki. Made from smooth and lightweight cotton fabric and measuring 90cm square (about 35 inches), these furoshiki can be twisted into wine bottle carriers, folded for gift-wrapping, knotted into a quick tote bag, spread out for a picnic, or simply tossed around your shoulders as a scarf.

From the initial design to the finishing touches, each scarf is hand-made. LINK collaborates with designers around the world to create new imagery for their scarves, adding a modern spin to the age-old concept. The small factory where each scarf is made has decades of experience that they use to pull each screen print; carefully air dry the scarves, and hand-roll and sew each seam for a polished finish.

We’ve selected some of our favorite designs for The Colossal Shop: clever origami-inspired trompe l’oeils of dots and paper, a journey tracing the dizzying path of the mountain-weaving Hida Express train, a dreamy scene of cherry blossoms in moonlight, and a contemporary take on the classic look of ruffles.

 

 



Crafts Design

Resin and Wood Jewelry by Britta Boeckmann Encapsulates Crashing Ocean Waves

July 4, 2017

Christopher Jobson

Australian jewelry designer Britta Boeckmann (previously) is known for her fusion of resin and wood, creating pendants and rings that highlight the contrast between these two different materials. Some of her latest handmade works incorporate a mixture of opaque white and semi opaque blue resin with fragments of Australian Salmon Gum wood, giving the uncanny appearance of waves crashing on shore when viewed from above. You can see more of her recent work in her Etsy shop.

 

 



Crafts

Lifelike Bird Pins Embroidered by Paulina Bartnik

June 6, 2017

Christopher Jobson

Warsaw-based embroidery artist Paulina Bartnik stitches colorfully lifelike brooches of birds and other tiny creatures in a dense style called needle painting. Each object begins as a piece of wool which she prods with a special needle in a process called dry felting which results in a surface ideal for embroidery. She then paints with a needle directly on the felt and embroiders the finer details. You can see more of her creations in her Etsy shop. (via Bored Panda)

 

 



Design Food

Shoe-Shi: Edible Sneakers That Combine an Artist’s Love of Footwear and Sushi

May 15, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

Milan-based Yujia Hu is an artist and chef who really likes to play with his food. The 28-year-old’s newest invention is “shoe shi,” sneakers and other types of footwear crafted from rice, seaweed, and raw fish. The miniature kicks are mostly sneakers, but also include a few pairs of slip on sandals, and are each 100% edible. Every shoe takes Hu about 30 minutes to produce, and often finalizes the work by adding the logo of a recognisable brand such as Nike, Adidas, or Supreme. You can see more of his edible edible shoes on his Instagram and Facebook. (via deMilked)

 

 



Design

New Designs Printed Directly From Urban Utility Covers by Berlin-Based Pirate Printers

April 19, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

Berlin-based art collective Raubdruckerin (which translates to pirate printer) (previously) uses elements of urban design to create guerilla printing presses, adding ink to manhole covers, grates, and street tiles to create utilitarian designs on t-shirts and bags. The experimental print makers view the works as footprints of a particular city, with current designs collected from Amsterdam, Athens, Paris, Lisbon, and their hometown of Berlin.

By printing each of the works outside, members of Raubdruckerin are immersed in the population of each city they print, imparting spectacle on aspects of a city’s design that are often overlooked. Other motivations of the project include a desire to stimulate a new perception to their audience’s surroundings, redefine everyday routines, and encourage printed sustainability. The group is incredibly considerate of the source of all materials that go into production, making sure to choose the right manufacturers for each certified organic cotton wearable and eco friendly ink.

The collective is currently on a tour through Europe through early May. You can follow their printing stops on their Facebook and Instagram, and see more urban printed designs on their online shop.

 

 

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