Tag Archives: fashion

Lifelike Bird Pins Embroidered by Paulina Bartnik 

Warsaw-based embroidery artist Paulina Bartnik stitches colorfully lifelike brooches of birds and other tiny creatures in a dense style called needle painting. Each object begins as a piece of wool which she prods with a special needle in a process called dry felting which results in a surface ideal for embroidery. She then paints with a needle directly on the felt and embroiders the finer details. You can see more of her creations in her Etsy shop. (via Bored Panda)

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Shoe-Shi: Edible Sneakers That Combine an Artist’s Love of Footwear and Sushi 

Milan-based Yujia Hu is an artist and chef who really likes to play with his food. The 28-year-old’s newest invention is “shoe shi,” sneakers and other types of footwear crafted from rice, seaweed, and raw fish. The miniature kicks are mostly sneakers, but also include a few pairs of slip on sandals, and are each 100% edible. Every shoe takes Hu about 30 minutes to produce, and often finalizes the work by adding the logo of a recognisable brand such as Nike, Adidas, or Supreme. You can see more of his edible edible shoes on his Instagram and Facebook. (via deMilked)

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New Designs Printed Directly From Urban Utility Covers by Berlin-Based Pirate Printers 

Berlin-based art collective Raubdruckerin (which translates to pirate printer) (previously) uses elements of urban design to create guerilla printing presses, adding ink to manhole covers, grates, and street tiles to create utilitarian designs on t-shirts and bags. The experimental print makers view the works as footprints of a particular city, with current designs collected from Amsterdam, Athens, Paris, Lisbon, and their hometown of Berlin.

By printing each of the works outside, members of Raubdruckerin are immersed in the population of each city they print, imparting spectacle on aspects of a city’s design that are often overlooked. Other motivations of the project include a desire to stimulate a new perception to their audience’s surroundings, redefine everyday routines, and encourage printed sustainability. The group is incredibly considerate of the source of all materials that go into production, making sure to choose the right manufacturers for each certified organic cotton wearable and eco friendly ink.

The collective is currently on a tour through Europe through early May. You can follow their printing stops on their Facebook and Instagram, and see more urban printed designs on their online shop.

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Wardrobe Snacks: Thoughtfully Composed Outfits that Perfectly Match Different Foods 

As part of a fantastic collaborative project between photographer Kelsey McClellan and prop/set stylist Michelle Maguire, the duo conceived of wardrobes that would perfectly match various foods. Titled Wardrobe Snacks, the series draws inspiration from the color, texture, or design of simple foods like a green ice cream cone, a plain yellow donut, or even an oyster and finds the uncannily matched outfit. You can see the full series here. (via artnau, This Isn’t Happiness)

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Kniterate: A New Digital Knitting Machine Lets You ‘Print’ Fashion Designs 

Kniterate is a compact industrial knitting machine created for designers and entrepreneurs that facilitates the one-off creation of garments. Built by London-based designer Gerard Rubio, Kniterate is meant to act as a sort of 3D printer for knitwear, allowing you to create digital designs in Photoshop and turn them into a wearable garments in just a few hours. The machine is capable of knitting scarves, sweaters, dresses, ties, or even the components of shoes. Kniterate could dramatically reduce lead time for a fashion business or design school in need of quick prototyping, or help a more ambitious artist in the fabrication a completely unique wardrobe. Learn more over on Kickstarter. (via Inhabitat, Make:)

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New Embroidered Clothes and Portraits by Lisa Smirnova 

Moscow-based embroidery artist Lisa Smirnova (previously here and here) continues to stitch beautifully rich illustrations of people, capturing the subtle details of eyes, hair, and shadows, thread by thread. Smirnova brings an almost painterly quality to her embroideries that are each infused with bright splashes of color and occasional patchworks of materials. Collected here are a number of pieces from the last year or so, but you can find additional recent projects on Behance.

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